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Tag: Endangered Species Act

The content below has been tagged with the term “Endangered Species Act.”

Articles

  • Water topples over a 25ft tall dam
    Information icon Hoosier Dam stood 25 feet tall and 235 feet across the Rocky River in Chatham County. It blocked the endangered Cape Fear shiner from reaching habitat upstream from 1922 until October 2018. Photo by Emily Wells, USFWS.

    North Carolina dam removal helps Rocky River and the endangered fish that lives there

    December 6, 2018 | 4 minute read

    The Cape Fear shiner, a federally protected North American minnow found only in central North Carolina, battles to survive with only one stronghold remaining in the lower reaches of the Rocky and Deep Rivers of North Carolina’s Upper Cape Fear River Basin. Many issues have piled up against this little fish, but a massive dam of reinforced concrete, averaging 25 feet tall and 235 feet across stood out, until recently, as a monumental obstacle to the species’ recovery.  Learn more...

  • Two large white birds flying low over a wetland coming in for a landing with a Service biologist in the foreground
    Information icon Two endangered whooping cranes coming in for a landing. Photo by Greg Pope.

    “Journey of the Whooping Crane” follows efforts to save a rare, endangered bird

    November 30, 2018 | 2 minute read

    In 1940, only about 20 whooping cranes were known to exist. Today, thanks to the diligence of many partners working together in the United States and Canada, there are more than 850 cranes in North America and the population continues to increase slowly and steadily. The iconic bird is one of the success stories of the Endangered Species Act (ESA). But it remains one of the rarest animals in the world.  Learn more...

  • A pine forest with trees snapped in half by high winds and a bent speed limit sign
    Information icon Tyndall Air Force Base pine forests were scissored by Hurricane Michael. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    After Hurricane Michael

    November 29, 2018 | 6 minute read

    Camilla, Georgia — Hurricane Michael barreled across prime Southern timber territory, damaging five million acres of pines and hardwoods and destroying nearly $1.7 billion worth of marketable trees. Habitat for many of the region’s at-risk species — red-cockaded woodpeckers, gopher tortoises, eastern indigo snakes — was sundered. Red-cockaded woodpecker in flight. Photo by Martjan Lammertink, U.S. Forest Service. Now, six weeks after Michael killed more than 45 people in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and Virginia, forest owners salvage timber, clear stands and pray for a market rebound.  Learn more...

  • Biologist assess damage to a forest after a hurricane
    Information icon Joshua Havird (blue shirt) and Joel Casto (plaid shirt) assess RCW clusters. Photo by Michael Keys, USFS.

    Test flight for red-cockaded woodpeckers

    November 21, 2018 | 3 minute read

    Joshua Havird lifted his quadcopter drone from its case as if he was handling a carton of eggs. The assistant fire management officer from St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge was on hand at the neighboring Apalachicola National Forest in the wake of Hurricane Michael. The Apalachicola, the only national forest on Florida’s panhandle and about 20 miles to the east of Mexico Beach, was hit hard on its western flank.  Learn more...

News

  • A light orange salamander with a bright orange stripe
    Information icon Juvenile striped newt. Photo by FWC.

    Conservation partnerships help keep two birds, salamander and skink from requiring endangered species act protections

    December 18, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Following rigorous scientific reviews, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that, thanks in part to ongoing conservation partnerships, four southeastern animals do not face the threat of extinction now or in the foreseeable future. Accordingly, the MacGillivray’s seaside sparrow, Florida sandhill crane, striped newt and Cedar Key mole skink do not warrant Endangered Species Act (ESA) protection. “Our efforts working closely with diverse partners to proactively understand and address threats to wildlife is succeeding,” said Leo Miranda, the Service’s Southeast regional director.  Read the full story...

  • Ozark snail species presumed extinct following science-based surveys

    December 18, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Following rigorous, science-based surveys, the Ozark pyrg, a small snail native to Arkansas and Missouri, is presumed extinct, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. No Ozark pyrgs have been confirmed in surveys since their first discovery in 1915. As a result of today’s finding, the pyrg will not be listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The spiral-shaped Ozark pyrg was originally found more than 100 years ago in the White River near Cotter, Arkansas, and in the North Fork White River near Norfork, Arkansas, extending into Missouri.  Read the full story...

  • A small, blue and yellow fish floating above rocky substrate
    Information icon Tippecanoe darter. Photo © Robert Criswell, used with permission.

    Tiny freshwater fish does not warrant federal protection

    December 18, 2018 | 3 minute read

    After a thorough scientific review, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that populations of the Tippecanoe darter, a small freshwater fish, do not warrant federal protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). In some places, surveys suggest increasing populations, likely due to improvements in water quality. One of the smallest darters in the world, the Tippecanoe darter continues to be found across its historical range in larger streams and rivers of the Ohio River watershed in Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and West Virginia.  Read the full story...

  • A tall, grey bird with red markings on its face laying low in the flooded grass
    Information icon Mississippi sandhill crane incubating its nest. Photo by USFWS.

    Endangered Mississippi sandhill cranes reintroduced to the wild

    December 17, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Yulee, Florida — White Oak Conservation is pleased to announce that three endangered Mississippi sandhill cranes that hatched this spring at White Oak were reintroduced to the wild last week at the Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge near Gautier, Mississippi. The three were released in partnership with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Audubon Species Survival Center. Only about 130 Mississippi sandhill cranes and 34 breeding pairs remain in the wild.  Read the full story...

  • New regional director to head southeastern conservation efforts Fish and Wildlife Service

    December 10, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Service officials announced late last month that Leopoldo “Leo” Miranda will head the Service’s Southeast Region. The tract encompasses 10 southeastern states as well as Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.  Read the full story...

  • An inquisitive red wolf looks into the distance.
    Information icon Red wolf (Canis rufus). Photo by Valerie, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Service extends red wolf review in North Carolina

    November 29, 2018 | 1 minute read

    In light of a federal court ruling issued earlier this month in the Eastern District of North Carolina, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is extending its review of a proposed rule to adapt its management of red wolves in the state. The additional review time will provide the Service the opportunity to fully evaluate the implications of the court decision.  Read the full story...

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