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Tag: Endangered Species Act

The content below has been tagged with the term “Endangered Species Act.”

Charleston

  • Several dozen cypress trees in an area that regularly floods
    Information icon Cypress trees at Cathedral Bay. Photo USFWS.

    Coastal program

    The South Carolina Coastal Program is a partnership driven program that conserves and protects natural habitat for federally listed species by providing technical and financial assistance for numerous public and private partners. The South Carolina Coastal Program is focused on the coastal plain of South Carolina and a portion of Georgia and works in a variety of habitats, including wetlands, uplands, estuaries, and beaches.  Learn more...

  • Dark, shiny oil covers a shoreline and the grasses growing on the beach.
    Information icon An oiled shoreline along the Savannah River. Photo by USFWS.

    Contaminants

    The role of the Environmental Contaminants Program in the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service is to protect wildlife and their habitat from the harmful effects of pollution. The Program’s main responsibilities include: Spill Incident planning and response, Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration (NRDAR), identification and assessment of potential environmental hazards, and technical support.  Learn more...

Series

  • Conserving paradise

    Take a trip with us down the Altamaha River. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service traveled the river from Jesup in Southeast Georgia to the barrier islands where the free-flowing Altamaha empties into the Atlantic Ocean.  Learn more...

Wildlife

  • A dark colored mussel embedded in a stream bed, open filtering water.
    Information icon Carolina heelsplitter. Photo by USFWS.

    Carolina heelsplitter

    Taxon: Mussel Range: North Carolina, South Carolina Status: Listed as endangered on June 30, 1993 Related content Sep 28, 2018 | 2 minute read Articles Private landowners step up to save the Carolina Heelsplitter Mar 9, 2018 | 3 minute read News Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of eight southeastern species Oct 13, 2017 | 2 minute read Articles Fish passage project benefits Carolina heelsplitter Jun 12, 2017 | 7 minute read Articles Musseling back from near extinction Jun 6, 2017 | 2 minute read Articles North Carolina biologist recognized for work to recover endangered species May 19, 2017 | 8 minute read News 2016 National and Regional Recovery Champions Jun 2, 2014 | 2 minute read Podcasts North Carolinas Conservation Aquaculture Center Aug 4, 2010 | 2 minute read Podcasts North Carolina’s conservation aquaculture center Wildlife Carolina heelsplitter Appearance The Carolina heelsplitter freshwater mussel was first described in 1852.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small catfish swimming above rocky substrate.
    Carolina madtom. Photo by D Biggins, former USFWS.

    Carolina madtom

    The Carolina madtom is a small catfish, reaching a maximum length of nearly five inches and can be found in riffles, runs, and pools in medium to large streams and rivers. Ideally, it inhabits fresh waters with continuous, year-round flow and moderate gradient in both the Piedmont and Coastal Plain physiographic regions.  Visit the species profile...

  • A biologist holding a small squirrel with yellow gloves
    Information icon A Carolina northern flying squirrel in the hands of a biologist. Photo by Sue Cameron, USFWS.

    Carolina northern flying squirrel

    The Carolina northern flying squirrel is an American endangered species found in North Carolina, Virginia and Tennessee. It is typically found at high elevations in mixed red spruce-northern hardwood and spruce-fir forests.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small black mussel with brownish yellow striations extends a small white appendage from its shell
    Information icon Cumberland bean juveniles reared at the Center for Mollusk Conservation in Frankfort, Kentucky. Photo by Monte McGregor, Center Mollusk Conservation, Kentucky DFWR.

    Cumberland bean

    The Cumberland bean is a small mussel found in Alabama, Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. It is protected as an endangered species and can be found in river systems within the Cumberland River and Tennessee River drainages.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small, straw-yellow colored fish with brown markings
    Information icon Photo by Jeremy Shute, Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Cumberland darter

    The Cumberland darter is a small, straw-yellow colored fish with brown markings found in 14 streams in Kentucky and Tennessee. It is protected as an endangered species and is threatened primarily by water pollution.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Eastern black rail

    Black rails are the smallest rails in North America. One of four recognized subspecies of black rail, the eastern black rail is perhaps the most secretive. This small inhabitant of shallow salt and freshwater marshes is rarely seen and has a distinctive “kick-ee-doo” call that is often heard at night.  Visit the species profile...

  • A white breasted bird with blueish grey feathers.
    Elfin-woods warbler. Photo by Mike Morel.

    Elfin-woods warbler

    The elfin-woods warbler was discovered in 1968. In 2016, the elfin-woods warbler was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act with a Section 4(d) rule providing exemptions for certain agriculture and forestry activities that may benefit the species.  Visit the species profile...

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