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Tag: Endangered Species Act

The content below has been tagged with the term “Endangered Species Act.”

Caribbean

  • An adult sea turtle on a sandy beach.
    Information icon Leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea). Photo © Karla Morales.

    Overseeing the Endangered Species Act

    One of the primary responsibilities of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. The Endangered Species Act (ESA) is America’s strongest conservation law. Originally passed by Congress in 1973, the ESA is jointly administered by the Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). The Service has primary responsibility for terrestrial and freshwater organisms, while the responsibilities of NMFS are mainly marine.  Learn more...

  • A vernal pool surrounded by bright purple flowers in the shadow of a forested mountain.
    Information icon Laguna Cartagena National Wildlife Refuge. Photo © José Almodóvar.

    Project evaluations

    The Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office promotes healthy wildlife and their habitat through a diverse group of programs: Endangered Species, Partners for Fish and Wildlife, Contaminants Program, Coastal Program and Project Evaluation.  Learn more...

  • A bright green parrot with red markings on its face and blue flight feathers.
    Information icon Puerto Rican parrot (Amazona vittata) © Alfredo Irizarry.

    Puerto Rican Parrot recovery program

    The Puerto Rican parrot recovery program is an effort to conserve, protect and manage wild and captive parrots in order to downlist the species from endangered to threatened.  Learn more...

Chattahoochee-Forest

  • An outstretched hand holding a dozen tiny bright orange eggs above a bin of thousands more.
    Information icon Rainbow trout eggs. Photo by USFWS.

    Frequently asked questions

    Where can I purchase a fishing license? To review Georgia fishing regulations and to purchase a license, please contact the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Wildlife Resources Division. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service does not issue fishing licenses. Can I go fish and camp nearby? Yes! Fishing is allowed in Rock Creek, which runs through hatchery grounds. Individuals must bring their own fishing gear, bait, license and trout stamp, all of which can be purchased at local stores.  Learn more...

Endangered-Species-Act

  • An adult bald eagle soars in front of a bright blue sky
    Information icon A bald eagle in flight at Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Tom Koerner, USFWS.

    Recovering threatened and endangered species

    After a plant or animal is listed as protected under the Endangered Species Act, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologists must determine what the species needs in order to achieve recovery, meaning it no longer requires federal protection.  Learn more...

Gulf-Restoration

  • A large group of bright white pelicans each with an orange beak and webbed feet.
    Information icon American white pelicans are protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918. Photo by Woody Woodrow, USFWS.

    Our Responsibilities

    The Service has a mandate to protect, conserve and/or enhance certain species and land on behalf of the American people.  Learn more...

Lafayette

  • A yellow brick building with lots of windows.
    Information icon The Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office. Photo by USFWS.

    Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office

    The field station was established in 1972. We strive for ecosystem sustainability through preservation, conservation, enhancement, and restoration of habitats essential for the long-term viability of the fish, wildlife, and plants in Louisiana.  Learn more...

  • Red-cockaded woodpecker flying from its nest.
    Red-cockaded woodpecker. Photo by Martjan Lammertink, U.S. Forest Service.

    Louisiana Endangered Species Act (ESA) project review and guidance for other federal trust resources

    Your browser is too old to render this site correctly. * Use Internet Explorer 9 or higher. * Remove this site from Compatibility View. You must enable JavaScript to use this application. You will be able to determine whether any threatened or endangered species or their critical habitats may exist within your project area and if your proposed action may affect (potential for negative impacts to federally listed species or critical habitat, if applicable) them.  Learn more...

Private-John-Allen

  • A small black and grey fish on a ruler.
    Information icon A nine inch lake sturgeon ready to be stocked in the Tennessee River. Photo by Daniel Schwarz, USFWS.

    Our fish

    Private John Allen National Fish Hatchery works to recover, restore and enhance threatened, endangered, at-risk and recreational fish populations in the Southeast.  Learn more...

  • Three biologists work together to lift a large grey fish with an alligator-like snout.
    Information icon Kayla Kimmel, Cory Gullett and Brady Barr holding a nice alligator gar. Photo by Richard Campbell, USFWS.

    Private John Allen National Fish Hatchery

    Private John Allen National Fish Hatchery works to recover, restore and enhance threatened, endangered, at-risk and recreational fish populations in the Southeast.  Learn more...

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