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Tag: Emerald Ash Borer

The content below has been tagged with the term “Emerald Ash Borer.”

Podcasts

  • A shiny green insect burrowed into a tree.
    Emerald ashe borer. Photo by USDA.

    Emerald ash borer control

    September 21, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. On a recent camping trip to Great Smoky Mountains National Park, it bore remembering that the park only allows outside firewood that is certified as being heated to the point that undesirable insects hitching a ride on the wood would be killed. One of the undesirable insects that is already in the park is the emerald ash borer. This Asian insect was first detected in the United States in Michigan in 2002 and has killed tens of millions of ash trees across the U.  Learn more...

  • A stack of aged firewood
    Firewood. Photo by Chris Warren, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Great Smoky Mountains National Park and heat-treated firewood

    July 28, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Officials at Great Smoky Mountains National Park are proposing to help protect park forests by further limiting the type of firewood brought into the park. Non-native, tree-killing insects and diseases can be unknowingly introduced into the park through firewood transported from infested areas. The park proposes reducing this threat by changing park rules to allow only heat-treated wood to be brought into the park for campground fires.  Learn more...

  • A shiny green insect burrowed into a tree.
    Emerald ashe borer. Photo by USDA.

    Protecting the Southern Appalachians from the emerald ash borer

    October 12, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This week we’ll look at ash trees and what’s casting a shadow over their future. Soon temperatures will warm and Southern Appalachia’s minor-league baseball stadiums will come to life. Baseball is a relatively slow-moving game, and it’s the crack of the bat that brings pause to conversations and lingering eyes back to the field. Focused on the action, few people ever give much thought to the bat.  Learn more...

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