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Tag: Eclipse

The content below has been tagged with the term “Eclipse.”

Articles

  • The sun begins to emerge from behind the moon during a solar eclipse.
    Information icon The eclipse just as totality is ending and the "diamond ring" is beginning to appear again. Photo by Bob Herndon, USFWS.

    Stellar eclipse at Clarks River National Wildlife Refuge

    August 24, 2017 | 2 minute read

    Clarks River National Wildlife Refuge in Benton, Kentucky, hosted a Great American Solar Eclipse event for visitors from a dozen different states and five different countries on August 21. Visitors enjoyed one minute and 57 seconds in the shadow of the moon. While waiting for the total solar eclipse, visitors participated in activities including fishing, and learning about wildlife, fisheries, and illegal wildlife trade. The younger visitors were treated to a story time and a Kid Zone with a bouncy castle that allowed children to jump like a frog.  Learn more...

  • The beach at Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge goes dark mid afternoon during the solar eclipse.
    Information icon Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuges goes dark during the total solar eclipse. Photo by Kristen Peters, USFWS.

    Dark delight

    August 23, 2017 | 5 minute read

    Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, South Carolina – The solar eclipse of 2017 seemed to approach slowly. In truth, it came hurtling toward the eastern edge of America at more than 1,000 mph, a 70-mile-wide swath of temporary nightfall that stopped traffic and quickened hearts.  Learn more...

  • A man and a woman stand in front of the welcome sign at a South Carolina refuge.
    Information icon Cindy Dohner, regional director of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services’ Region 4, and Greg Sheehan. He recently became the principal deputy director at the Service. Photo by Kristen Peters

    Director: Refuge ‘a natural treasure’

    August 23, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, South Carolina – Ask Greg Sheehan what he thinks about the nation’s wildlife refuges and be prepared to wait for his response. For Sheehan, principal deputy director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), something as important as the nation’s 500-plus refuges deserves a measured answer. They are that important. As he stood under the branches of a dead tree that had succumbed to the ocean at Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, Sheehan thought about America’s wild lands – the mountains, the prairies, the beaches that surrender to the tireless tides.  Learn more...

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