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Tag: Eastern Small-Footed Bat

The content below has been tagged with the term “Eastern Small-Footed Bat.”

Podcasts

  • A small furry bat in a crevice of a cave with patches of white fungus on its face and shoulder.
    Information icon A northern-long-eared bat with suspected White Nose Syndrome. Photo by Steve Taylor, University of Illinois.

    Bats step closer to endangered species list

    August 1, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. White-nose syndrome is a deadly bat disease that has killed more than a million bats in the Eastern United States. Many have asked what this means for the long-term survival of entire species of bats, and we may be beginning to get an idea. The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service maintains the federal list of threatened and endangered species. Under the Endangered Species Act, anyone can ask the Service to add a plant or animal to that list, and based on the information they provide and information the Service already has, wildlife biologists may decide to investigate further, possibly deciding to add the species to the list.  Learn more...

  • A river runs through a valley in fall.
    Information icon Eastern small-footed bat. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    New bats for endangered species list?

    April 18, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The spread of white-nose syndrome, the deadly bat disease, brings with it many questions, one of the most important, what will become of our bat populations? Parts of the eastern United States have already seen dramatic die-offs in bat numbers. In response to white-nose syndrome, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, which maintains the U.S. list of endangered species, has been asked to add two more bat species to that list.  Learn more...

  • A river runs through a valley in fall.
    Eastern small-footed bat. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Eastern small-footed bats

    June 19, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. During the winter of 2006-2007, North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission biologists examining a mine in Haywood County found 109 eastern small-footed bats, the largest known hibernation colony of this species in the southeast. A return to the mine in the winter of 2007-2008 turned up just 56 bats, though it’s quite possible the bats shifted to an inaccessible part of the mine.  Learn more...

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