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Tag: Eastern Indigo Snake

The content below has been tagged with the term “Eastern Indigo Snake.”

Articles

  • A low-growing shrub with leaves like sand dollars
    Information icon A rare hairy rattleweed plant. Photo by Daniel Chapman, USFWS.

    Learning to love a hairy rattleweed

    February 18, 2020 | 6 minute read

    Brunswick, Georgia — It sounds like the name of a punk rocker, or an illicit drug. It lurks under power lines, along roadsides and between rows of commercial pine trees. It’s covered in tiny, cobwebby hairs. It’s got a shape only a botanist could love. Pity the little-known, inelegantly named hairy rattleweed, or Baptisia arachnifera. It is one of the nation’s rarest plants, found in only two southeast Georgia counties and federally listed as an endangered species.  Learn more...

  • A small spotted frog in a petri dish with wet vegetation.
    Information icon Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery has been raising gopher frogs for three years, a departure from its traditional responsibilities of propagating fish. Photo by USFWS.

    A good year at the hatcheries

    February 5, 2020 | 5 minute read

    The results are in from another year of propagating snakes and birds and tortoises. The verdict? Allan Brown, help us out. “Good,” said Brown, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s (Service) Assistant Regional Director of Fish and Aquatic Conservation. “Actually, better than that. It was great.” Brown oversees a Service office that increasingly focuses on more than just fish. Hatcheries across the region are raising an array of creatures — indigo snakes, Florida grasshopper sparrows and mussels of various stripes, to name a few — in addition to taking care of traditional duties: propagating fish.  Learn more...

  • A green toad with dark spots in a biologist’s gloved hand
    Information icon Biologists at the Saratoga National Fish Hatchery in Wyoming hopped at the chance to raise the endangered Wyoming toad. Photo by USFWS.

    They’re growing what?

    November 6, 2019 | 9 minute read

    In Virginia and South Carolina hatcheries, biologists keep a close eye on shad and striped bass while taking time to focus on something that will never wear scales: mussels. And down in Florida, hatchery scientists charged with making sure rivers and streams are stocked with catfish and bass are singing the praises of a tiny bird they’re raising outside their labs. The Tishomingo National Fish Hatchery is growing alligator snapping turtles to boost that species’ population.  Learn more...

  • A blue sky partially obscured by tall green pine trees.
    Information icon Longleaf pine stand located in the Coastal Headwaters forest in Alabama. Photo by USDA.

    Coastal Headwaters project in Florida is a major step for longleaf pine restoration

    April 24, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Pace, Florida — Rarely has the establishment of a conservation easement generated such fanfare. But dozens of public, private and nonprofit officials on Wednesday extolled the wonders of the permanent setting-aside of 3,719 acres of forested land. Coastal Headwaters Longleaf Forest; Healthy Forest Reserve Program Conservation Easement. Map by Roberta Moore, The Conservation Fund. This, though, was no ordinary celebration. It’s likely the first of many such easements intended to restore majestic longleaf pine stands across a large swath of private property.  Learn more...

  • A pine forest with trees snapped in half by high winds and a bent speed limit sign
    Information icon Tyndall Air Force Base pine forests were scissored by Hurricane Michael. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    After Hurricane Michael

    November 29, 2018 | 6 minute read

    Camilla, Georgia — Hurricane Michael barreled across prime Southern timber territory, damaging five million acres of pines and hardwoods and destroying nearly $1.7 billion worth of marketable trees. Habitat for many of the region’s at-risk species — red-cockaded woodpeckers, gopher tortoises, eastern indigo snakes — was sundered. Red-cockaded woodpecker in flight. Photo by Martjan Lammertink, U.S. Forest Service. Now, six weeks after Michael killed more than 45 people in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and Virginia, forest owners salvage timber, clear stands and pray for a market rebound.  Learn more...

  • A deep black snake coiled up on sandy soil with young longleaf pine seedlings in the background
    Information icon An Eastern indigo snake on sandy soil associated with the longleaf pine ecosystem. Photo © Houston Chandler, the Orianne Society (Used with permission).

    Snakes in a bag

    May 25, 2018 | 8 minute read

    Andalusia, Alabama — A gaggle of biologists, zookeepers, college students and government officials traipsed through the Deep South longleaf pine forest one recent, gorgeous spring morning carefully clutching white pillowcases. They were looking for holes. More specifically, gopher tortoise burrows into which they could deposit their precious cargo of Eastern indigo snakes, aka “Emperors of the Forest.” Southern Alabama including Conecuh National Forest. Map by Roy Hewitt, USFWS.  Learn more...

News

  • A light brown snake with darker black and brown markings on a green vine.
    Puerto Rican boa. Photo by Jan Paul Zegarra.

    Service announces recovery plan revisions for 43 species, to assist in measuring progress and addressing threats

    August 5, 2019 | 5 minute read

    As part of an agency-wide effort to advance the recovery of our nation’s most imperiled species, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has made publicly available draft revisions for 21 recovery plans that provide a recovery roadmap for 43 federally protected species. This batch of recovery plan revisions is part of the Department of the Interior’s Agency Priority Performance Goals. The effort calls for all recovery plans to include quantitative criteria on what constitutes recovery by September 2019.  Read the full story...

  • A man in a green shirt kneels down into tall grass to release a long black snake.
    Information icon David Printiss of TNC releases an eastern indigo snake into a gopher tortoise burrow during a 2018 release. Photo by Tim Donovan, FWC.

    Good news for America’s longest snake! 15 eastern indigo snakes just released in year three of the North Florida recovery effort

    June 11, 2019 | 8 minute read

    Tallahassee, Florida — Fifteen eastern indigo snakes, listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, have just been released in northern Florida as part of a continuing collaborative plan to return the important, native, non-venomous apex predator to the region. This effort marks the third year in a row that snakes raised specifically for recovery of the species have been released at The Nature Conservancy’s Apalachicola Bluffs and Ravines Preserve (ABRP) in Bristol.  Read the full story...

  • A small woodpecker perched on a pine tree.
    Information icon In 2018, there were 38 active clusters of endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers on this property in Alabama, thriving there under a Safe Harbor Agreement. Composite photo by Mark Bailey.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service honors Recovery Champions on Endangered Species Day

    May 16, 2019 | 3 minute read

    Endangered Species Day, May 17, 2019, is a day to celebrate efforts to recover 1,663 species on the list of federal endangered wildlife and plants protected under the Endangered Species Act.  Read the full story...

  • Red-cockaded woodpecker flying from its nest.
    Red-cockaded woodpecker. Photo by Martjan Lammertink, U.S. Forest Service.

    Base recognized for conservation work

    May 30, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Camp Blanding, flush with federally endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers, donates juvenile birds to other wildlife areas across the South. Nearly two-thirds of the National Guard base in Northeast Florida is prime habitat for at-risk gopher tortoises too. More than 10,000 acres of pine and scrub is carefully burned each year to benefit under-threat flora and fauna as well as conservation-friendly longleaf pines. And the joint military base is a critical piece in the creation of a wildlife corridor that connects central Florida to southeast Georgia.  Read the full story...

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