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Tag: Eastern Hellbender

The content below has been tagged with the term “Eastern Hellbender.”

Podcasts

  • A brown and black amphibian in a plastic container.
    Ozark hellbender. Photo by Jill Utrup, USFWS.

    Ozark hellbender

    January 23, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Once you see a hellbender, you never forget it. Hellbenders are salamanders, but not just any salamanders. They’re big salamanders. Growing up to three feet in rare instances, it’s fairly easy to comes across individuals at least a foot long here in the Southern Appalachians. Despite their size, they’re essentially harmless to humans and are part of a healthy stream ecosystem.  Learn more...

  • Two orange salamanders with dark brown splotches.
    Patch-Nosed Salamander (Urspelerpes brucei). Photo by Todd Pierson, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.

    New salamander discovered in north Georgia

    September 25, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The Southern Appalachians is a region known for its salamander diversity, the most famous of which is probably the hellbender, North America’s largest salamander, occasionally reaching lengths greater than 30 inches. However, it’s a very small salamander that has been getting some recent attention. The patch-nosed salamander, the second smallest in the U.S., was recently discovered in North Georgia. It was first spotted by Bill Peterman, a University of Missouri graduate student visiting a stream near Toccoa, Georgia with a team of researchers from the University of Georgia in 2007.  Learn more...

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