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Tag: E-Grits

The content below has been tagged with the term “E-Grits.”

Articles

  • Eight employees in USFWS uniform pose for a photograph in front of a slash pine forest.
    Information icon Front: Brantley Boatright; Ladies (l to r): Sara Aicher, Gracie Gooch, Judy Drury, Dartha Campbell; Men (l to r): Reggie Forcine, Howard McCullough, Rocky Chesser. Photo, USFWS.

    Okefenokee proud of its employees with many years of loyal service

    May 30, 2018 | 3 minute read

    Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge has many profound distinctions; but, none as great as the loyalty of its staff. 40 percent of the 20-person staff have more than 20 years of experience at Okefenokee, and all but one of those employees grew up around the Okefenokee Swamp. In fact, 12 refuge employees are from the local area. These staff members are well known in the communities around the refuge and have worked closely with surrounding landowners and local businesses that provide services to the refuge.  Learn more...

  • Small pink birds with rounded bills wade through the shallow water.
    Information icon Roseate spoonbills out in the water. Photo by Corey Douglas.

    iNaturalist BioBlitz offers fun opportunities to citizen scientists throughout Southeast

    May 25, 2018 | 2 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is sponsoring the iNaturalist 2018 BioBlitz at the 130 national wildlife refuges and 14 fish hatcheries in the Service’s Southeastern Region, encouraging everyone to use the iNaturalist smartphone app to record species and share information on them.  Learn more...

  • A woman wearing a warm hat preparing to plant a tiny spruce tree seedling.
    Information icon Sue Cameron plants a red spruce at Whigg Meadow in Tennessee. Photo by Garry Peeples, USFWS.

    Women lead the effort on Appalachian mountain-top forests

    May 24, 2018 | 8 minute read

    The story of an ambitious effort to restore red spruce to the Southern Appalachians spearheaded by four women brought together by a commitment to the highest peaks east of the Mississippi River.  Learn more...

  • A small fish covered in small, colorful polka dots of red and black
    Information icon The Bayou darter is only found in one small watershed in Mississippi, and is listed as threatened under the ESA. Photo by Matt Wagner, Mississippi Dept. of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks.

    Partners for Fish and Wildlife helps Mississippi landowners, threatened fish

    May 16, 2018 | 3 minute read

    The Bayou Pierre River meanders for 95 miles through southwestern Mississippi, where it eventually flows into the mighty Mississippi River. More than 60 different kinds of fish make their home in its watershed, and one of them, the Bayou darter, has been listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act since 1975. It’s the only place in the world where the little 2-inch fish is found. The darter likes shallow, fast-flowing streams with gravel streambeds, and those are plentiful in the Bayou Pierre watershed, although not as plentiful as they used to be.  Learn more...

  • A creek runs through a forest.
    Information icon Ohatchee creek, a tributary of the Coosa River in Alabama. Photo by Paul Johnson, ADCNR.

    Stalking the rare painted rocksnail

    April 12, 2018 | 6 minute read

    Calhoun County, Alabama — Biologists Nathan Whelan and Paul Johnson weren’t sure what they’d find when they launched their boat on that balmy Alabama morning. Whelan, a biologist currently serving as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s regional geneticist for the Southeast Region, was updating a scientific manuscript on the painted rocksnail, and needed the most recent information on its current range. The painted rocksnail is a rather cryptic-looking small-to-medium sized freshwater snail with yellowish-brown coloring.  Learn more...

  • A mussel with fringe around its opening partially burried in the sand on the river bottom.
    Information icon Appalachian elktoe in the Little River Translyvania County NC. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Endangered mussel making a comeback in the French Broad River

    March 22, 2018 | 5 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina — In 1834, a freshwater mussel collected near the convergence of the Swannanoa and French Broad Rivers was recognized as a new species – the Appalachian elktoe. Eighty years later, Carnegie Museum curator and University of Pittsburg professor Arnold Ortman couldn’t find any elktoes in the French Broad River, attributing his failure to polluted water. Biologists search for Appalachian elktoes in the Mills River.  Learn more...

  • Large brick building.
    Information icon Mammoth Spring Aquatic Conservation Center. Photo by Sara Seagraves, USFWS.

    Southeast Region snags Environmental Leadership awards

    March 16, 2018 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Southeast Region swept both of the Interior’s 2017 Environmental Leadership awards for energy conservation accomplishments in 2016. Congratulations to Dale Bumpers White River National Wildlife Refuge and Mammoth Springs National Fish Hatchery, both located in Arkansas, for facility upgrades that won them Refuge of the Year and Fish Hatchery of the Year, respectively. Both facilities achieved LEED Silver status from the U.S. Green Building Council in 2016.  Learn more...

  • Employee standing next to an information booth with a beaming smile.
    Information icon Ashley Buffington represents Wolf Creek at the 13th Annual Kentuckiana Fly Show. Photo by USFWS.

    Wolf Creek participates in 13th annual Kentuckiana Fly Show

    March 16, 2018 | 1 minute read

    On Jan. 27, 2018, I represented Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery at the 13th Annual Kentuckiana Fly Show in Shepherdsville, Kentucky. Derby City Fly Fishers, a non-profit organization based in Louisville, hosts the Kentuckiana Fly Show each year, drawing about 400 members of the public. More than 40 exhibitors and vendors participated, including professional fly-fishing guides, government agencies, and non-profit organizations. Representatives from the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources and the Indiana Department of Natural Resources were available to answer questions concerning regulations.  Learn more...

  • Dozens gather for a ribbon cutting ceremony.
    Information icon Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge staff members Jereme Phillips and Brittany Petersen mark the reopening of the Jeff Friend Trail with help from the Blue Goose, the mascot of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Photo by Nanciann Regalado, USFWS.

    Bon Secour trail reopening underscores priority of access to public lands

    March 15, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge in Gulf Shores is not only one of the largest undeveloped parcels of land on the Alabama coast, it’s also one of the few places where you can go from the primary dunes along the Gulf of Mexico to a maritime forest and uplands. “It’s like a snapshot of what the Gulf coast was like hundreds and thousands of years ago,” says Jereme Phillips, the refuge manager.  Learn more...

  • Aerial photo of the education center with colorful fields of flowers and a red visitors center.
    Information icon The Fred Berry Conservation Education Center in Arkansas sits on 21 acres donated by a retired schoolteacher. The center is restoring some of the land to native grassland/savanna habitat with funding provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program. Photo by Arkansas Game and Fish Commission.

    One project, many outcomes

    February 28, 2018 | 3 minute read

    One of the great things about habitat improvement projects is that a seemingly simple project can lead to many conservation outcomes. That has been the case with the native grassland restoration project on the Fred Berry Conservation Education Center, located on Crooked Creek in Marion County, Arkansas. The 421-acre property, which is managed by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission (AGFC), lies within a long 2.75-mile bend of Crooked Creek, a premier smallmouth bass stream, in the Arkansas Ozarks.  Learn more...

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