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Tag: E-Grits

The content below has been tagged with the term “E-Grits.”

Articles

  • Wolf Creek and KDFWR go mussellin’

    November 5, 2019 | 3 minute read

    To the untrained eye, freshwater mussels are often overlooked or mistaken for rocks or other debris in stream beds and riverways. North America, particularly the Eastern United States, maintains the highest diversity of these animals. Freshwater mussels play a vital role in aquatic ecosystems as bioindicators and as natural in-stream filters, yet they rarely get the recognition they deserve.  Learn more...

  • A new culvert under a bridge allows water to flow freely rather than through narrow channels.
    Information icon Downstream view of the Gills Creek Drive road crossing after culvert replacement. Photo, Morgan Wolf, USFWS

    Against all odds: return of the Gills Creek ecosystem

    October 28, 2019 | 2 minute read

    If you had asked recovery biologists 10 years ago to list the best places to return mussels to the wild, Gills Creek would have been at the very bottom of that list. The small South Carolina stream had been through a lot. Too much, it seemed, to recover. Situated just south of Charlotte, North Carolina, and east of Lancaster, South Carolina, the watershed had seen the advance of suburban sprawl, and was battling ongoing agricultural degradation.  Learn more...

  • 2019 regional “Sense Of Wonder” award winner

    September 30, 2019 | 1 minute read

    It is with great pride we announce Patricia Midgett, visitor services manager at Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, located in South Carolina, as our 2019 Regional “Sense Of Wonder” Award recipient.  Learn more...

  • Recruits and law enforcement officials pose for a photo in front of the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge visitors center sign.
    Information icon Night Police Academy volunteers L to R: Barry Kincl, Craig Kistner, Taylor Bronson, Amanda Marsh, Julia Will, William "Buddy" Spence, Travis Helton, and Ben Daniels. Photo by Robin Will, USFWS.

    Law Enforcement volunteers plant imperiled wildflowers

    September 9, 2019 | 2 minute read

    Instead of firearms and handcuffs, volunteers from the Pat Thomas Law Enforcement Academy’s Basic Recruit Class 485⁄487- Night Law were wielding shovels and unloading rescued plants during a spring weekend at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge in Florida. Wading in mud and water and keeping an eye out for cottonmouths and pygmy rattlesnakes in the wetlands between the refuge’s Visitor Center and Education Building, academy students planted swamp milkweed, few-flower milkweed, and milkweed vine to provide host and food plants for monarch butterflies.  Learn more...

  • Two women in USFWS uniforms supervise a booth at the Kentucky State Fair.
    Information icon Moria Painter and Jane Herndon ready for visitors at the Kentucky State Fair. Photo by Bob Herndon, USFWS.

    Showing off some trout at the Kentucky State Fair

    August 30, 2019 | 1 minute read

    Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery maintained a booth at the 116th Annual Kentucky State Fair. The booth displayed rainbow, brown and brook trout, event flyers, hatchery literature, and educational booklets. More than 600,000 people attended the 10-day fair and had access to the hatchery booth.  Learn more...

  • Tiny fish swim out of a plastic bag aand into a stream
    Information icon Barrens topminnows being released into Short Springs. Photo, Erin Johnson, USFWS.

    Barrens topminnows released into Short Springs

    August 22, 2019 | 1 minute read

    This spring, 67 Barrens topminnows were released into Short Springs located near Tullahoma, Tennessee. These Barrens topminnows were spawned at Conservation Fisheries Inc. (CFI). The Tennessee Aquarium and CFI provide Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery with the topminnows when they reach about 10-12 millimeters in length for grow-out. Cultured fish are released at about 25 millimeters, and Wolf Creek typically makes one or two releases during the year. The program is coordinated with the Cookeville, Tennessee, Ecological Services Field Office.  Learn more...

  • Bird rookery now protected as part of St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge

    August 20, 2019 | 2 minute read

    Shell Point, Florida — St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge celebrated the acquisition of Smith Island by the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge at the refuge’s pavilion overlooking beautiful Apalachee Bay. It was an auspicious day, with pelicans sailing in front of participants as if to add their approval of the event. This small island, 20 acres or so, is about 90 percent saltmarsh, with the remainder containing a handful of small trees and bushes.  Learn more...

  • A dozen or more sisters and alumnae from Zeta Phi Beta and their children post for a photo on a boardwalk with refuge staff
    Information icon Zeta Phi Beta with staff from ARM Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Zeta Phi Beta, sorority.

    Pearls in the Everglades

    August 20, 2019 | 2 minute read

    This summer, for the third consecutive year, the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge welcomed the Zeta Phi Beta sorority in support of the Pearls in the Wild initiative — a way to introduce young black women to the bountiful recreation opportunities available at their local national wildlife refuges. This effort has also been successful in providing opportunities to interact and learn from refuge staff about the different career opportunities in natural resources.  Learn more...

  • Thousands of pelicans dot an island landscape shot from above
    Information icon Aerial view of Queen Bess Island, which supports an important brown pelican rookery in Louisiana. Photo by Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

    Streamlined environmental compliance process benefits brown pelican rookery

    August 20, 2019 | 4 minute read

    “Good Queen Bess” (a.k.a. Queen Elizabeth I) is credited with putting an end to a period of instability in mid-16th century England. Unfortunately, the tiny scrap of land in Louisiana that bears her name, Queen Bess Island, has been anything but stable. The island, located about two-and-a-half miles north of Grand Isle in Barataria Bay, has been sinking and eroding into the Gulf of Mexico. This is a matter of concern, as Queen Bess Island supports the third largest brown pelican rookery in Louisiana.  Learn more...

  • A large backhoe hammers away at a dam from a rocky bank.
    Information icon Deconstruction begins using an 8000 lb. hydraulic breaker mounted on an excavator. Photo by Eric Spadgenske, USFWS.

    Partnerships run deep

    July 12, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Removing a nearly 100-year-old, 100-foot-long concrete and steel structure from the main channel of one of Alabama’s major river basins is no small undertaking. For any single agency, it would be nearly impossible. The solution may sound cliché, but in Alabama partnerships carry the day. Howle and Turner Dam. Photo by Eric Spadgenske, USFWS. Four years, four months, and 15 days – that is how long it took from fledgling thought to completion.  Learn more...

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