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Tag: E-Grits

The content below has been tagged with the term “E-Grits.”

Articles

  • Biologists wearing white gowns head-to-toe walking through nets in a marsh holding whooping cranes.
    Information icon Biologists tend to whooping cranes in one of the release pens at White Lake Wetlands Conservation Area. Photo by Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

    Whooping crane reintroduction continues in Louisiana

    May 3, 2017 | 2 minute read

    The whooping crane reintroduction effort is well underway in southwestern Louisiana. Since 2011, 10-16 hatched juveniles have been released annually here into the non-essential experimental population (NEP). The original release pens are located at White Lake Wetlands Conservation Area, and in 2016 a new release area was added 19 miles to the south at Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge. The expanded release areas allow the NEP to receive more juvenile cranes for release into the wild.  Learn more...

  • A male and female volunteer work on a trail with shovels.
    Information icon Volunteers John Adams and Julia Hoss begin trail reroute on the nature trail. Photo by Moria Painter, USFWS.

    Wolf Creek volunteers make lasting improvements

    May 3, 2017 | 1 minute read

    Volunteers play a vital part in the daily operations at Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery. They staff the visitor contact station with coverage 364 days a year and help with daily fish production needs. A rare opportunity occasionally presents itself when volunteers with exceptional skills arrive. This winter, Wolf Creek was fortunate to have John Adams and Julia Hoss join the team for a trail reroute project. They brought a wealth of trail building knowledge and experience to the hatchery, having both worked several seasons at the national Philmont Scout Ranch in New Mexico.  Learn more...

  • A deer similar in appearance to a white-tailed deer, but much smaller in size
    A Key deer on Big Pine Key in Florida. Photo by Garry Tucker, USFWS.

    Support and cooperation cure the New World screwworm infestation in the Keys

    April 12, 2017 | 2 minute read

    The unexpected New World screwworm infestation of the endangered Key deer confirmed September 30, 2016, by the U.S. Department of Agriculture was found on 13 Keys and led to 135 Key deer deaths. Screwworms are fly larvae or maggots that infest warm-blooded animals through open wounds and feed on living tissue. They were formerly eradicated from the U.S. in the 1960’s. The herculean effort to eliminate screwworms and save the Key deer was recently celebrated at a public meeting on March 25, 2017.  Learn more...

  • Employees and volunteers in personal flotation devices unload oyster shell from a boat.
    Information icon USFWS employees and volunteers offloading bags of shell for the oyster reef project. Photo by Sandee Dawdy, Pelican Island NWR volunteer.

    Oyster reef project designed to aid pelican island

    March 10, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Dozens of people got their feet wet in the Indian River Lagoon on February 28 while building an oyster reef breakwater at Pelican Island National Wildlife Refuge in Vero Beach, Florida. The reef is designed to prevent further erosion of iconic Pelican Island, which has already decreased in size by 60 percent from its original 5.5 acres. Over a span of about six hours, staff and volunteers from several agencies transported (by truck and by boat) about 600 bags of fossilized shells and stacked them around a small mangrove island near Pelican Island proper at the refuge that bears its name.  Learn more...

  • Conserving imperiled aquatic species in the Upper Tennessee River Basin

    May 5, 2016 | 1 minute read

    A team of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service scientists, with assistance from U.S. Geological Survey, have developed a collaborative conservation strategy examining cost-effective approaches for efforts to conserve and manage 36 imperiled freshwater fish and mussel species in the 22,360 square-mile Upper Tennessee River Basin. The strategy identifies aquatic species conservation objectives and recommends a management approach for conserving and recovering prioritized species and locations across the basin.  Learn more...

  • A dark grey bird with bright red inflated ball under its neck.
    Magnificent frigatebird. Photo by Mark Vance CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Luring magnificent frigatebirds back to Key West National Wildlife Refuge

    April 3, 2016 | 3 minute read

    While thousands of non-breeding magnificent frigatebirds can be found across the coastlines of Florida and the Caribbean during many months of the year, there is now only one known breeding frigatebird colony in North America.  Learn more...

News

  • Hundreds of brown pelicans cover a vegetated beach.
    Brown pelicans sitting on nests at Breton Island National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Greg Thompson, USFWS.

    Strategic conservation assessment will help guide gulf conservation

    April 11, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Remember the story of the blind men and the elephant? A group of blind men each feel a different part of an elephant so they end up having widely different interpretations of what the whole elephant looks like. A similar situation exists with land conservation in the Gulf of Mexico region. Although there are a large number of land conservation plans already in existence across the Gulf, many are limited either geographically or organizationally.  Read the full story...

  • Bright green needles emerge from a central cone of a longleaf pine tree
    Information icon Longleaf pine needles. Photo by Dot Paul, USDA NRCS.

    Seeing the forest for the trees

    April 6, 2016 | 3 minute read

    More than 30 animal species that depend on longleaf pine forests are federally listed as endangered or threatened, and many more are considered to be at-risk. This is why the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with partners to restore longleaf pine across the southeastern United States.  Read the full story...

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