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Tag: E-Grits

The content below has been tagged with the term “E-Grits.”

Articles

  • A small, fuzzy, brown bat baring teeth in the hands of a biologist
    Information icon Northern long-eared bat captured in Bladen County, NC. Photo by Gary Jordan, USFWS.

    Aiding the northern long-eared bat

    November 19, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Bats provide valuable ecosystem services that impact the world’s economy and our lives. They pollinate cash crops and forests, disperse seeds, produce fertilizer and control pests by devouring insects. Many bat species are in decline, however, due to habitat loss and disease, especially white-nose syndrome (WNS). The Service has been working with partners promoting conservation, research and innovation to fight back at the national level. In the eastern half of the U.  Learn more...

  • A bright white bird with a red patch on its head and identifying tags on its legs wads through a marsh
    Information icon Whooping crane, L4-17 at Holla Bend NWR. Photo courtesy of Ronald Duvall.

    Female whooping crane visits Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge

    November 15, 2019 | 1 minute read

    Arkansas’ Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge is hosting a Louisiana reared whooping crane. The first observation of the crane on the refuge was October 3. According to Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries biologist Sara Zimorski, this crane is a 2 1⁄2-year-old female that was released in 2017. Whooping crane, L4-17 at Holla Bend NWR. Photo courtesy of Ronald Duvall. Unlike most of the juveniles released at the same time, she took off immediately, has spent more time outside of Louisiana than in it, and has covered a lot of ground in two years.  Learn more...

  • Exploring my roots blossomed into helping others track their family histories

    November 14, 2019 | 3 minute read

    One of the great benefits of working for the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service is its belief in work-life balance, allowing employees to pursue our own interests outside the office and providing the flexibility to take the time off needed to pursue these interests. My interest is in genealogy.  Learn more...

  • Partnerships work toward conservation of two Puerto Rico plants

    November 14, 2019 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s, Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office has been collaborating with the British institution the Royal Botanic Garden, Kew, for nearly a decade to define and implement sound conservation efforts aimed toward the recovery of Puerto Rico’s threatened and endangered plant species. This collaboration seeks to build capacity and to promote communication and exchange of knowledge between Puerto Rican and international institutions, including the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez (UPRM), Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources (PRDNER), the University of Portsmouth, the National Parks Trust of the British Virgin Islands (BVI), Vieques National Wildlife Refuge, and the Service.  Learn more...

  • A green mat-forming plant covers the open water in a marsh
    Information icon Giant salvinia covering a pond in fresh marshes near Forked Island, 6-May-2016. Photo by Ronny Paille, USFWS.

    Bio-control of giant salvinia in coastal Louisiana

    November 13, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Giant salvinia is an invasive floating fern from Brazil. The plant spreads vegetatively, from whole plants or plant fragments. Giant salvinia can double its surface acreage in less than one week. It has been spreading and causing problems in coastal Louisiana since 1989. Giant salvinia tends to accumulate in small ponds or areas lacking water exchange. Once it covers the water’s surface, this floating plant will begin to stack up upon itself, and can extend 12 inches or more above the water surface.  Learn more...

  • Nearly two dozen veterans and a german shepherd pose for a photo in front of the Wolf Creek NFH visitors center holding their striped bass catch
    Information icon Group photo of participants. Photo by Ashley Buffington, USFWS.

    Wolf Creek hosts annual Wounded Warrior fishing event

    November 7, 2019 | 2 minute read

    On Sept. 11, 2019, Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery and its Friends Group hosted the eighth annual Wounded Warrior Fishing Event. Typically, five or six fishing guides volunteer their services to take 25 wounded veterans out for a morning of striped bass fishing on Lake Cumberland. Seven guides volunteered this year, allowing the staff to offer an additional five spots on the voyage. With the warm lake temperatures, low oxygen this time of year, and lack of rain, even the stripers were showing signs of stress and weren’t biting often.  Learn more...

  • A man wearing a safety harness installs a large antenna on the roof of a school.
    Information icon The Motus tower is mounted on top of Vero Beach High School by electronics technician Steve Alfano. Photo courtesy of the School District of Indian River County.

    Canadian nighthawk is first bird detected by Vero Beach Motus tower

    November 6, 2019 | 2 minute read

    Approximately 25 days after it was captured and tagged, a common nighthawk migrating from Canada became the first bird detected by the Motus tower on top of Vero Beach High School on Aug. 29.  Learn more...

  • Six veterans pose for a photo in front of several pieces of heavy machinery
    Information icon The six-person Team and equipment they’re now trained on, with thanks to FWS instructor Aaron Eaton, far right. Photo by Jessica Sutt, FWS.

    Veterans training and hurricane restoration combine at Florida wildlife refuge

    November 5, 2019 | 2 minute read

    Team Rubicon is a veterans service organization that uses disaster response to help reintegrate veterans back into civilian life. Veteran-founded, this international service organization employs leadership and organizational skills to assist communities with disaster response and recovery. At Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge, Project Leader Kevin Godsea recognized a partnership opportunity when David Venables of Team Rubicon called him to ask if he could partner with the refuge for field training.  Learn more...

  • Wolf Creek and KDFWR go mussellin’

    November 5, 2019 | 3 minute read

    To the untrained eye, freshwater mussels are often overlooked or mistaken for rocks or other debris in stream beds and riverways. North America, particularly the Eastern United States, maintains the highest diversity of these animals. Freshwater mussels play a vital role in aquatic ecosystems as bioindicators and as natural in-stream filters, yet they rarely get the recognition they deserve.  Learn more...

  • A new culvert under a bridge allows water to flow freely rather than through narrow channels.
    Information icon Downstream view of the Gills Creek Drive road crossing after culvert replacement. Photo, Morgan Wolf, USFWS

    Against all odds: return of the Gills Creek ecosystem

    October 28, 2019 | 2 minute read

    If you had asked recovery biologists 10 years ago to list the best places to return mussels to the wild, Gills Creek would have been at the very bottom of that list. The small South Carolina stream had been through a lot. Too much, it seemed, to recover. Situated just south of Charlotte, North Carolina, and east of Lancaster, South Carolina, the watershed had seen the advance of suburban sprawl, and was battling ongoing agricultural degradation.  Learn more...

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