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Tag: E-Grits

The content below has been tagged with the term “E-Grits.”

Articles

  • Hundreds of pelicans flying over a shoreline
    Information icon Brown Pelicans flying over St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Nicole Rankin, USFWS.

    Florida shorebird surveys underway thanks to creative staffing

    July 16, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Crystal-clear waters and white sandy beaches are two features you will find at St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses St. Vincent Island in the northwestern portion of the Florida Gulf coast. Besides being surrounded by pristine Outstanding Florida Waters, the barrier island refuge is also an important safe haven for at-risk species, including gopher tortoise, Florida red-bellied turtles, and black rail birds. It is an important stop-over point for neotropical migratory birds - birds that breed in North America but spend winters in Mexico, Central America, South America or the Caribbean islands.  Learn more...

  • A lone pine tree stands tall on a narrow peninsula along a bay
    Information icon Weeks Bay marsh, Alabama. Photo by Weeks Bay NERR.

    Gateway to Weeks Bay conserved for future generations

    June 2, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Whether gliding through the mouth of Weeks Bay by motor or paddle craft, the first strip of land that catches a voyager’s eye is the East Gateway Tract. The tract is roughly 175 acres of critically important and diverse land that includes micro-dune habitat, tidal streams, marshland, and forested wetlands. The water surrounding East Gateway is a prime fishing location with a prevalence of redfish and speckled trout, which is not to be outdone by the bird watching opportunities on the tract, as it provides wonderful habitat for migratory birds.  Learn more...

  • Service staff stand under a Chattahoochee Forest NFH tent for an event
    Information icon Welcome tent at the Scout event. Photo by Volunteer Scout Leader.

    Chattahoochee Forest NFH (GA) educates scouts about trout fishing

    January 24, 2020 | 1 minute read

    On Nov., 2019, Chattahoochee Forest National Fish Hatchery program assistant Crystal Thomas and volunteer Mike Morton staffed a booth about trout fishing during the 2019 Hornaday Weekend-Atlanta Area Council at the Woodruff Scout Camp in North Georgia. Hundreds of scouts from all over the southeastern United States visited the hatchery booth seeking information about trout fishing, ethics and conservation. Some were seasoned at fishing while others were seeking a first-time experience.  Learn more...

  • A vine grows over a small pond covered in algae and fallen shrub branches
    Information icon Okeechobee gourd vines spreading across the landscape at restoration site. Photo by Rob Hopper, South Florida Water Management District.

    Okeechobee gourd thriving at Everglades restoration site

    January 23, 2020 | 3 minute read

    The endangered Okeechobee gourd got a new home and started the new year, and for that matter, the new decade with a bang. Previous efforts to successfully translocate the gourd and establish new populations were relatively unsuccessful, due to issues that included hydrology, predation, and invasive competition. However, in the summer of 2019, several locations within the Sam Jones/Abiaki Prairie Restoration site south of Lake Okeechobee were planted with the gourd, and today they are thriving.  Learn more...

  • Learning about aquatic invertebrates

    January 10, 2020 | 1 minute read

    In November 2019, Bears Bluff National Fish Hatchery staff held an aquatic invertebrate diversity lab with four third and fourth grade classes and one gifted and talented class at James B. Edwards Elementary School in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina.  Learn more...

  • An upland forest edge after mechanical thinning
    Information icon Grand Bay habitat area after mastication. Photo by USFWS.

    Deepwater Horizon settlement Funds help Mississippi coastal habitats

    December 17, 2019 | 2 minute read

    Habitat management activities are well underway on the Deepwater Horizon Natural Resource Damage Assessment Grand Bay Land Acquisition and Habitat Management Project.  Learn more...

  • Several dozen children pose for a photo in front of a sign that reads "Eco Conservation Field Day"
    Information icon 4th grade students from Russell Springs Elementary School. Photo by Moria Painter, USFWS.

    Outdoor Eco Day Success at Wolf Creek NFH

    November 20, 2019 | 2 minute read

    Crisp autumn weather is the perfect setting for a day spent learning about Environmental Education in the great outdoors. For 229 fourth graders from Russell County Elementary schools enjoyed the annual Outdoor Eco Day hosted by Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery (NFH) and the Friends of Wolf Creek NFH, Inc. on October 25. Students arrived by bus in the early morning hours, departing the bus at the visitor center and traveling by foot to nine different stations located on hatchery grounds.  Learn more...

  • Two participants show off their catch of eight trout on the bank of Hatchery Creek.
    Information icon The couple who fish together, stays together. Photo by Mackenzie Foster, USFWS.

    Smiles abound at Wolf Creek for the 12th annual Catch a Smile Senior Fishing Derby

    November 20, 2019 | 1 minute read

    Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery and the Friends of Wolf Creek NFH hosted the 12th Annual Catch a Smile Senior fishing derby on Sept. 24, 2019. Over 190 seniors, age 62 and over enjoyed the fun-filled day. Big fish! Equal even Bigger smiles! Photo by Mackenzie Foster, USFWS. Participants enjoyed a lunch of grilled hamburgers, hotdogs, chips, drinks and desserts. Each participant took home a door prize, provided by local sponsors, that included camp lights, camp chairs, camp coffee pots, flashlights, fishing gear, and many other items.  Learn more...

  • A small, fuzzy, brown bat baring teeth in the hands of a biologist
    Information icon Northern long-eared bat captured in Bladen County, NC. Photo by Gary Jordan, USFWS.

    Aiding the northern long-eared bat

    November 19, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Bats provide valuable ecosystem services that impact the world’s economy and our lives. They pollinate cash crops and forests, disperse seeds, produce fertilizer and control pests by devouring insects. Many bat species are in decline, however, due to habitat loss and disease, especially white-nose syndrome (WNS). The Service has been working with partners promoting conservation, research and innovation to fight back at the national level. In the eastern half of the U.  Learn more...

  • A bright white bird with a red patch on its head and identifying tags on its legs wads through a marsh
    Information icon Whooping crane, L4-17 at Holla Bend NWR. Photo courtesy of Ronald Duvall.

    Female whooping crane visits Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge

    November 15, 2019 | 1 minute read

    Arkansas’ Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge is hosting a Louisiana reared whooping crane. The first observation of the crane on the refuge was October 3. According to Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries biologist Sara Zimorski, this crane is a 2 1⁄2-year-old female that was released in 2017. Whooping crane, L4-17 at Holla Bend NWR. Photo courtesy of Ronald Duvall. Unlike most of the juveniles released at the same time, she took off immediately, has spent more time outside of Louisiana than in it, and has covered a lot of ground in two years.  Learn more...

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