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Tag: Dillsboro Dam

The content below has been tagged with the term “Dillsboro Dam.”

Articles

  • A mechanical jackhammer works on removing the Dillsboro dam.
    Information icon Removing the Dillsboro Dam. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Tuckasegee River revives after dam removal

    March 28, 2012 | 5 minute read

    Two years after watching a hydraulic hammer begin removing the Dillsboro Dam from the Tuckasegee River, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) biologist Mark Cantrell is excited about what the removal is coming to mean for life beneath the river’s surface. “When the Nantahala area relicensing process offered the possibility of dam removal, we saw an opportunity to transform a portion of the river and restore part of our lost natural heritage,” said Cantrell, who specializes on the impacts of dams on rivers.  Learn more...

  • A NC biologist holding a sicklefin redhorse on a river bank in front of a hydroelectric dam.
    Information icon North Carolina biologist TR Russ holding an sicklefin redhorse. Photo by Mark Cantrell, USFWS.

    Researchers work to keep rare ƒish off endangered species list

    June 30, 2008 | 4 minute read

    On the bank of the Little Tennessee River, downstream from the town of Franklin, biologists squeeze tiny yellow eggs from a fish into a plastic bag. Unlike caviar, these eggs won’t be eaten, but rather trucked to a high-tech aquatic lab in Knoxville, Tennessee, to join an effort to keep a rare fish off the endangered species list. The fish is a sicklefin redhorse, a recently discovered species found only in the western tip of North Carolina and a small bit of North Georgia.  Learn more...

Podcasts

  • A NC biologist holding a sicklefin redhorse on a river bank in front of a hydroelectric dam.
    Information icon North Carolina biologist TR Russ holding an sicklefin redhorse. Photo by Mark Cantrell, USFWS.

    Sicklefin redhorse conservation

    February 6, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature The Little Tennessee River runs wide and deep just below Emory Dam, outside Franklin North Carolina. In the late-morning sun on an April day, a jon boat plied the water back and forth. Protruding from the bow and dropping into the water was a pair of electrodes wired to an on-board generator. Perched in the bow was a biologist with a long-handled net waiting to scoop up fish stunned by the electric current flowing through the water.  Learn more...

  • A furry, brown bat resting in the crevace of a cave.
    Hibernating Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis). Photo by Ann Froschauer, USFWS.

    Monitoring bats along the Tuckasegee River

    May 1, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. A pair of biologists sat patiently beside the Tuckasegee River, staring at a set of wooden boxes mounted on a wooden pole on the rivers’ bank, waiting for the sun to go down. With enough darkness, bats started dropping out of the boxes to begin their nightly feeding on insects near the river. It has been more than two years since the Dillsboro Dam, on the Tuckasegee River, was removed, and everything indicates the removal has been positive for the river as native fish and other aquatic animals are expanding into habitat previously cut off to them, and using areas previously unusable.  Learn more...

  • A piece of heavy machinery deconstructs a small dam.
    A trackhoe begins the work of demolishing Dillsboro Dam. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Rebirth of the Tuckasegee River

    March 14, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This tiny olive dater is a fish is rare enough to get the attention of state and federal wildlife biologists, so any help it gets is welcome. The fish had never been found upstream of Dillsboro Dam in North Carolina’s Tuckasegee River. However, that dam was removed two years ago, and biologists have since discovered one of the darters upstream of the former dam site, hopefully expanding a range previously limited by a massive stone wall.  Learn more...

  • A piece of heavy machinery deconstructs a small dam.
    A trackhoe begins the work of demolishing Dillsboro Dam. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Dillsboro Dam removal

    March 9, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. As a small crowd watched, a hydraulic hammer recently knocked away the first chunk of stone and concrete from Dillsboro Dam. Within weeks, the entire 12-foot high dam will be gone. It’s one of a series of Duke Energy hydropower facilities on western North Carolina’s Tuckasegee River. Federal law requires operators of private hydropower dams to address impacts to fish and wildlife.  Learn more...

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