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Tag: Didymo

The content below has been tagged with the term “Didymo.”

Podcasts

  • Pinkish red flowers burst from a tree.
    Dogwood in bloom. Photo by dalemcneill, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Cherokee education project

    March 7, 2016 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. White oak, ramps, dogwood. All these are plants important to the Cherokee tradition, and the Forest Service has teamed with the Cherokee to expand scientific and cultural understanding of these plants and more on the part of Cherokee students. Working with staff at the Cherokee’s Snowbird Youth Center in Robbisnville, North Carolina, the Forest Service developed a learning module on culturally important plants for students in kindergarten through twelfth grade.  Learn more...

  • A microscopic algae shown under a microscope.
    Information icon Didymosphenia geminata under a microscope. MUSE [CC BY-SA 3.0](https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0), via Wikimedia Commons.

    Didymo

    February 1, 2016 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Researchers recently found a nuisance algae in Jackson County’s Tuckasegee River, prompting calls for anglers to be especially diligent when cleaning fishing equipment. Didymo, also called rock snot, can produce algal mats along stream bottoms so thick that they alter habitats and make fishing difficult. Researchers from Tennessee Tech University collected cells of the algae in 2015 — the first time it has been documented in North Carolina.  Learn more...

  • A microscopic algae shown under a microscope.
    Information icon Didymosphenia geminata under a microscope. MUSE [CC BY-SA 3.0](https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0), via Wikimedia Commons.

    Didymo - what does the spread of this northern algae mean for Southern Appalachian streams?

    Transcript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This week, we’ll look at algae that’s becoming the scourge of western trout anglers and is knocking on the door of the Southern Appalachians. Unless you’re an angler or a biologist, you may not even know what a mayfly is. It’s a harmless insect that spends most of its life living in water. Anglers know the mayfly because it’s an important fish food and therefore the inspiration of numerous lures.  Learn more...

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