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Tag: Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

The content below has been tagged with the term “Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill.”

Articles

  • Hundreds of shore birds line a sand bank with yellow oil boom in the background.
    Information icon North Breton Island, like many barrier islands, provides habitat for a wide range of bird species. Photo by Greg Thompson, USFWS.

    Restoring a buffet for birds on North Breton Island

    February 6, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Any mention of Louisiana frequently d conjures up images of delicious Cajun and Creole food – po’boys, gumbo, jambalaya and more. “Barrier islands” probably won’t pop into most people’s heads. But these islands are vitally important because they protect Louisiana communities from the impact of storms by acting like speed bumps, absorbing wind and wave energy. In addition, they provide essential habitat for birds and other wildlife. North Breton Island, part of the Breton National Wildlife Refuge, is one such barrier island.  Learn more...

  • hundreds of birds dot a small island below a bright blue sky.
    Information icon DOI is leading a $72 million restoration of Breton Island off the coast of Louisiana that will benefit brown pelicans, terns, skimmers and gulls. Photo by Brian Spears, USFWS.

    Meet the Gulf Restoration Office

    May 31, 2018 | 3 minute read

    As the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service rolled into fiscal year 2018, we ushered in many exciting changes to our Gulf of Mexico restoration initiative that emerged from the Global Settlement for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. This comprehensive legal settlement resolved the governments’ civil claims under the Clean Water Act and natural resources damage claims under the Oil Pollution Act stemming from the 2010 disaster in the Gulf, the largest offshore oil spill in history.  Learn more...

  • Dozens gather for a ribbon cutting ceremony.
    Information icon Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge staff members Jereme Phillips and Brittany Petersen mark the reopening of the Jeff Friend Trail with help from the Blue Goose, the mascot of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Photo by Nanciann Regalado, USFWS.

    Bon Secour trail reopening underscores priority of access to public lands

    March 15, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge in Gulf Shores is not only one of the largest undeveloped parcels of land on the Alabama coast, it’s also one of the few places where you can go from the primary dunes along the Gulf of Mexico to a maritime forest and uplands. “It’s like a snapshot of what the Gulf coast was like hundreds and thousands of years ago,” says Jereme Phillips, the refuge manager.  Learn more...

  • two yellow flowers growing out of very sandy soil.
    Information icon Ground chokecherry. Photo by USFWS.

    Sowing plants to reap dunes

    February 28, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Restoration biologist Kate Healy felt the sun on her face as she stood on a sandy stretch of beach along Alabama’s Gulf coast. It was an unseasonably warm day on Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge, and Healy, a biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Gulf Restoration Office in Fairhope, Alabama, was ready to get to work. Kate Healy and Jackie Sablan plant ground chokecherry at Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge in Alabama.  Learn more...

  • “Dedication” must be Pam Rule’s middle name

    October 13, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Pam Rule knows what it means to focus on a single project at time. What’s more, she knows what it means to focus on a single project for a long time – a very long time. For almost seven years, program analyst Pam Rule has dedicated her career to one project - and one important responsibility. Since the Deepwater Horizon oil spill occurred on April 20, 2010, Pam’s job has been to “follow the money” to ensure BP, the party primarily responsible for the spill, paid for the response-related costs incurred by the U.  Learn more...

  • Vegetation grows out of sand dunes at the beach.
    Information icon Dunes on Perdue Unit at Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by USFWS.

    Oil spill funds help protect shorebird nesting and improve monarch butterfly habitat

    May 18, 2017 | 3 minute read

    The sparkling beaches of Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge in Alabama attract visitors of all shapes and size—and species. Bon Secour’s beaches and dunes are visited not only by tens of thousands of people each year but also by the many kinds of wildlife our refuge managers are charged with protecting and preserving every day. On any warm spring day at Bon Secour, you may find sunbathers, swimmers, nature lovers, birds, beach mice, crabs, foxes, insects and scores of others.  Learn more...

  • A tiny turtle hatchling covered in sand.
    Green sea turtle hatchling at Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Keenan Adams, USFWS.

    Five things you need to know

    April 20, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Did you know that the good health of the Gulf of Mexico depends on places far from the Gulf Coast? Thirty-one states (more than 50% of the contiguous US) have rivers, creeks, and streams that eventually drain into the Gulf of Mexico. The Gulf of Mexico watershed includes states as far away as Montana and New York! Did you know that it is actually very easy to cause additional harm to the environment when cleaning up oiled shorelines?  Learn more...

News

  • Dozens of grey and white birds taking flight on the beach.
    Elegant and Royal Terns. © Beedie Savage CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Silver Lining: Gulf of Mexico Avian Monitoring Network

    May 18, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Many people were upset as they watched the unfolding devastation of wildlife and habitat caused by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Some were also troubled by the realization that there weren’t adequate baseline data on the birds of the Gulf to assist decision-makers responding to the crisis. “There were bird data, but the bird data were limited and very disjointed,” says the Service’s Randy Wilson.  Read the full story...

  • TWo biologists on a beach wearing gloves photograph and document a dead sea gull.
    Information icon A USFWS biologist documents the GPS coordinates for a dead gull found in Gulfport, Mississippi, during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Photo by Bonnie Strawser, USFWS.

    Service employees lead studies on toxic and physical effects of oil on birds

    August 3, 2016 | 2 minute read

    The USFWS led efforts to assess the injury to bird species caused by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.  Read the full story...

  • TWo biologists on a beach wearing gloves photograph and document a dead sea gull.
    Information icon A USFWS biologist documents the GPS coordinates for a dead gull found in Gulfport, Mississippi, during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Photo by Bonnie Strawser, USFWS.

    Deepwater Horizon oil spill killed as many as 102,000 birds across 93 species

    June 1, 2016 | 5 minute read

    In order to hold those responsible for an oil spill accountable for injury and death of wildlife biologists estimate the total number of animals killed, which can be a difficult process.  Read the full story...

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