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Tag: Dam Removal

The content below has been tagged with the term “Dam Removal.”

Articles

  • Water cascades about a dozen feet down the dam, which stretches 100 yards across the Green River. A sunny day, with flowers in the shot, and the river is rocky.
    Information icon Water cascades about a dozen feet down the dam, which stretches 100 yards across the Green River. Photo by Mark Davis.

    Going, going…

    July 1, 2021 | 4 minute read

    Woodbury, Kentucky – Federal, state and local environmentalists are preparing to do what more than a century of rushing water has not achieved: Demolish a lock and dam. It will change a stretch of the Green River forever. Officials from practically every level of government gathered Monday, June 28, to take a last look at lock and dam No. 5, a half-hour drive from Bowling Green. The dam, 100 yards across, and the lock, which is 120 yards long, are the latest Green River structures whose days are numbered.  Learn more...

  • A free-flowing river with sandy banks and large, green, mature trees.
    Information icon Site of the former Green River lock and dam No. 6 across from Mammoth Cave National Park. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    With dam removed, Green River goes with the flow

    September 24, 2019 | 10 minute read

    Brownsville, Kentucky — The blacktop, like so many others, ends at the Green River. A few fire rings and Bud Light cans litter the banks. Swallowtail butterflies flit among the oaks, poplars and sycamores. The river ambles unobstructed this warm summer day. There’s not much to see at the popular fishing spot across from Mammoth Cave National Park. It’s what you don’t see that matters. Two years ago a decrepit concrete lock and dam straddled the river posing a serious hazard to swimmers, kayakers and underwater creatures.  Learn more...

  • A large backhoe hammers away at a dam from a rocky bank.
    Information icon Deconstruction begins using an 8000 lb. hydraulic breaker mounted on an excavator. Photo by Eric Spadgenske, USFWS.

    Partnerships run deep

    July 12, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Removing a nearly 100-year-old, 100-foot-long concrete and steel structure from the main channel of one of Alabama’s major river basins is no small undertaking. For any single agency, it would be nearly impossible. The solution may sound cliché, but in Alabama partnerships carry the day. Howle and Turner Dam. Photo by Eric Spadgenske, USFWS. Four years, four months, and 15 days – that is how long it took from fledgling thought to completion.  Learn more...

  • water topels over a foot drop after a dam was removed on the Sucarnoochee River.
    Information icon Native fishes and mussels can move upstream after removal of Livingston Dam in Alabama. Photo by Eric Spadgenske, USFWS.

    Livingston Dam: A restoration story

    April 10, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Livingston, Alabama — The Sucarnoochee River is a sleepy coastal plain river that snakes its way through the Black Belt (the band of fertile soil crossing central Alabama and northeast Mississippi), near the University of West Alabama. The ‘nooch has only been studied by a handful of scientists and is not well known as a major tourist destination. Home to unique animals with comparably unique names, like bankclimber, fawnsfoot, Alabama orb, bluehead chub, and naked sand darter, this river contributes to the state of Alabama’s depth of aquatic biodiversity.  Learn more...

News

Private-John-Allen

  • Three biologists work together to lift a large grey fish with an alligator-like snout.
    Information icon Kayla Kimmel, Cory Gullett and Brady Barr holding a nice alligator gar. Photo by Richard Campbell, USFWS.

    Private John Allen National Fish Hatchery

    Private John Allen National Fish Hatchery works to recover, restore and enhance threatened, endangered, at-risk and recreational fish populations in the Southeast.  Learn more...

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