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Tag: Dam Removal

The content below has been tagged with the term “Dam Removal.”

Articles

  • water topels over a foot drop after a dam was removed on the Sucarnoochee River.
    Information icon Native fishes and mussels can move upstream after removal of Livingston Dam in Alabama. Photo by Eric Spadgenske, USFWS.

    Livingston Dam: A restoration story

    April 10, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Livingston, Alabama — The Sucarnoochee River is a sleepy coastal plain river that snakes its way through the Black Belt (the band of fertile soil crossing central Alabama and northeast Mississippi), near the University of West Alabama. The ‘nooch has only been studied by a handful of scientists and is not well known as a major tourist destination. Home to unique animals with comparably unique names, like bankclimber, fawnsfoot, Alabama orb, bluehead chub, and naked sand darter, this river contributes to the state of Alabama’s depth of aquatic biodiversity.  Learn more...

  • Water cascades over the edge of a dam strewn with logs and debris
    Information icon The Milburnie Dam, just east of Raleigh, has been demolished. The Neuse River now flows, unimpeded, about 150 miles to the Pamlico Sound. It clears the way for migratory fish to spawn upstream. Photo by Mike Wicker, USFWS.

    To the sea

    December 15, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Who knows how long the great river ran unimpeded from the pine forests and hardwoods to the sea? Scientists can only estimate. But they can tell you when that great river resumed its restless push to the Atlantic Ocean: Nov. 22, 2017. On that day, the Milburnie Dam crumbled. It was the last structure impeding the Neuse River’s flow across eastern North Carolina to the mouth of the Pamlico Sound, 150 miles to the east.  Learn more...

  • A large group of employees pose for a photo on the banks of the Green River.
    Information icon Employees stationed in Kentucky gather at the site of the lock and dam number 6 on the Green River near Mammoth Cave National Park. Photo by Robert Herndon, USFWS.

    Kentucky annual meeting includes dam breach visit

    May 3, 2017 | 1 minute read

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employees stationed in Kentucky met for the annual All Employee Meeting on February 22, at Mammoth Cave National Park in Cave City, Kentucky. Originally, this meeting was to be hosted at the Ecological Services office in Frankfort. Instead, the Ecological Services staff hosted the meeting at a more centralized location. Representatives from the Ecological Services office, Clarks River National Wildlife Refuge, law enforcement, and Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery provided updates for each field station and reported new employees and recent retirements.  Learn more...

News

  • A backhoe breaks apart a dam in a stream
    Information icon Heavy machinery gets to work removing the Congaree Creek Dam near Columbia, SC. Photo by Kaley Lawrence, SCDNR.

    Small dam scheduled to be removed from Columbia-area creek

    May 16, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Through a successful partnership, the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR), American Rivers, Congaree Riverkeeper and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) are happy to announce plans to remove a small dam from one Columbia-area creek starting May 21. Removal of the small sheet pile dam in the Congaree Creek would result in restoring the natural flow of the stream, improving habitat for aquatic species, and removing a safety hazard for boaters.  Read the full story...

  • A birds-eye-view photograph of an inefficient rock dam.
    Information icon Represa Cambalache. Photo © William Hernández.

    El Servicio Federal de Pesca y Vida Silvestre comienza la remoción de la Represa de Cambalache del Río Grande de Arecibo

    March 20, 2019 | 3 minute read

    Arecibo, Puerto Rico — El Servicio Federal de Pesca y Vida Silvestre (Servicio) junto con el Departamento de Recursos Naturales y Ambientales de Puerto Rico (PRDRNA) y otros colaboradores, iniciaron la remoción de la Represa de Cambalache, localizada en el Río Grande de Arecibo. La remoción de esta represa conectará y restaurará 25 kilómetros del Río Grande de Arecibo a unas condiciones de hábitat más naturales, proveyéndole así a los peces y otras especies acuáticas un hábitat más saludable con un flujo de agua libre.  Read the full story...

  • A birds-eye-view photograph of an inefficient rock dam.
    Information icon Represa Cambalache. Photo © William Hernández.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service begins removal of Cambalache Dam to aid conservation of Río Grande de Arecibo

    March 20, 2019 | 2 minute read

    Arecibo, Puerto Rico — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (the Service), along with the Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources (PRDNER) and other partners, today began the removal of the Cambalache Dam. The removal of the low-rise dam will connect and restore 25 kilometers of riverine habitat to a more natural state, as well as provide fish and other aquatic species with a healthier, free-flowing stream. It will also rid the river of a safety hazard, decrease erosion and boost recreational opportunities upstream of Arecibo.  Read the full story...

  • A birds-eye-view photograph of an inefficient rock dam.
    Information icon Represa Cambalache. Photo © William Hernández.

    El Servicio Federal de Pesca y Vida Silvestre anuncia la disponibilidad del borrador de la Evaluación Ambiental para la remoción parcial y/o modificación de la represa Cambalache ubicada en el Río Grande de Arecibo, Puerto Rico

    September 27, 2018 | 4 minute read

    El Servicio Federal de Pesca y Vida Silvestre del Gobierno de los Estados Unidos (USFWS, por sus siglas en inglés) anuncia la disponibilidad del borrador de la Evaluación Ambiental (EA) para la remoción parcial y/o modificación de la represa Cambalache ubicada dentro de la cuenca del Río Grande de Arecibo (RGA) en el municipio de Arecibo, Puerto Rico. Este borrador de la EA se preparó como un requisito de la Ley de Política Ambiental Nacional (NEPA, por sus siglas en inglés) e incluye información de la acción propuesta para la remoción parcial/modificación de la represa existente.  Read the full story...

  • A birds-eye-view photograph of an inefficient rock dam.
    Information icon Cambalache dam. Photo © William Hernández.

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announces the availability of the Draft Environmental Assessment for the Cambalache dam partial removal and/or modification located within the Río Grande de Arecibo in Puerto Rico

    September 27, 2018 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) announces the availability for public comments of the draft Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Cambalache dam partial removal and/or modification located within the Río Grande de Arecibo (RGA) watershed in Arecibo, Puerto Rico. This draft EA has been prepared as a requisite of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and includes information of the proposed action for the partial removal/modification of the existing low-head dam.  Read the full story...

  • Heavy equipment works away at a decrepit concrete dam.
    Information icon Cane River dam removal in process. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Cane river dam removal

    April 13, 2017 | 3 minute read

    In the fall of 2016, the final piece of concrete was removed from the Cane River Dam, in North Carolina’s Yancey County, completing a process started eight years earlier. Built in the early 20th century, it’s hydropower generating house once provided all the electricity used in the county, but decades ago it was damaged, fell into disrepair, and has deteriorated ever since. The Cane River is home to the endangered Appalachian elktoe mussel, making it a priority area for U.  Read the full story...

Private-John-Allen

  • Three biologists work together to lift a large grey fish with an alligator-like snout.
    Information icon Kayla Kimmel, Cory Gullett and Brady Barr holding a nice alligator gar. Photo by Richard Campbell, USFWS.

    Private John Allen National Fish Hatchery

    Private John Allen National Fish Hatchery works to recover, restore and enhance threatened, endangered, at-risk and recreational fish populations in the Southeast.  Learn more...

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