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Tag: Dam Removal

The content below has been tagged with the term “Dam Removal.”

Articles

  • A large backhoe hammers away at a dam from a rocky bank.
    Information icon Deconstruction begins using an 8000 lb. hydraulic breaker mounted on an excavator. Photo by Eric Spadgenske, USFWS.

    Partnerships run deep

    July 12, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Removing a nearly 100-year-old, 100-foot-long concrete and steel structure from the main channel of one of Alabama’s major river basins is no small undertaking. For any single agency, it would be nearly impossible. The solution may sound cliché, but in Alabama partnerships carry the day. Howle and Turner Dam. Photo by Eric Spadgenske, USFWS. Four years, four months, and 15 days – that is how long it took from fledgling thought to completion.  Learn more...

  • water topels over a foot drop after a dam was removed on the Sucarnoochee River.
    Information icon Native fishes and mussels can move upstream after removal of Livingston Dam in Alabama. Photo by Eric Spadgenske, USFWS.

    Livingston Dam: A restoration story

    April 10, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Livingston, Alabama — The Sucarnoochee River is a sleepy coastal plain river that snakes its way through the Black Belt (the band of fertile soil crossing central Alabama and northeast Mississippi), near the University of West Alabama. The ‘nooch has only been studied by a handful of scientists and is not well known as a major tourist destination. Home to unique animals with comparably unique names, like bankclimber, fawnsfoot, Alabama orb, bluehead chub, and naked sand darter, this river contributes to the state of Alabama’s depth of aquatic biodiversity.  Learn more...

  • Water cascades over the edge of a dam strewn with logs and debris
    Information icon The Milburnie Dam, just east of Raleigh, has been demolished. The Neuse River now flows, unimpeded, about 150 miles to the Pamlico Sound. It clears the way for migratory fish to spawn upstream. Photo by Mike Wicker, USFWS.

    To the sea

    December 15, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Who knows how long the great river ran unimpeded from the pine forests and hardwoods to the sea? Scientists can only estimate. But they can tell you when that great river resumed its restless push to the Atlantic Ocean: Nov. 22, 2017. On that day, the Milburnie Dam crumbled. It was the last structure impeding the Neuse River’s flow across eastern North Carolina to the mouth of the Pamlico Sound, 150 miles to the east.  Learn more...

  • A large group of employees pose for a photo on the banks of the Green River.
    Information icon Employees stationed in Kentucky gather at the site of the lock and dam number 6 on the Green River near Mammoth Cave National Park. Photo by Robert Herndon, USFWS.

    Kentucky annual meeting includes dam breach visit

    May 3, 2017 | 1 minute read

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employees stationed in Kentucky met for the annual All Employee Meeting on February 22, at Mammoth Cave National Park in Cave City, Kentucky. Originally, this meeting was to be hosted at the Ecological Services office in Frankfort. Instead, the Ecological Services staff hosted the meeting at a more centralized location. Representatives from the Ecological Services office, Clarks River National Wildlife Refuge, law enforcement, and Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery provided updates for each field station and reported new employees and recent retirements.  Learn more...

News

Private-John-Allen

  • Three biologists work together to lift a large grey fish with an alligator-like snout.
    Information icon Kayla Kimmel, Cory Gullett and Brady Barr holding a nice alligator gar. Photo by Richard Campbell, USFWS.

    Private John Allen National Fish Hatchery

    Private John Allen National Fish Hatchery works to recover, restore and enhance threatened, endangered, at-risk and recreational fish populations in the Southeast.  Learn more...

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