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Tag: Cumberland River

The content below has been tagged with the term “Cumberland River.”

Articles

  • A half dozen large silver fish jumping out of the water to a height of six feet.
    Information icon School of jumping silver carp. Photo by Ryan Hagerty, USFWS.

    A war in the water

    March 19, 2018 | 8 minute read

    Eastport, Mississippi — This stretch of the Tennessee River is considered the most aquatically biodiverse in the nation, teeming with sportfish and at-risk snails and mussels. Locals boast that Pickwick Lake, where Mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee come together, is “the smallmouth bass capital of the world.” Catfish and buffalo fill commercial angler’s nets. Marinas lining the reservoir’s roads attest to Pickwick’s huge economic impact. Yet the Tennessee River, and a way of life, is under siege.  Learn more...

News

  • Hundreds of fish cornered next to a concrete dam by an electrofishing boat jump out of the water.
    Information icon Electrofishing demonstration at Barkley Dam resulted in dozens of Asian carp jumping out of water. Photo by USFWS.

    Bio-acoustic fish fence now operational at Lake Barkley

    November 8, 2019 | 8 minute read

    Grand Rivers, Kentucky — An experimental project designed to keep invasive Asian carp from moving farther up the Cumberland River was unveiled Friday at Lake Barkley. A bio-acoustic fish fence (BAFF) was deployed on the downstream side of Barkley Lock. U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell and U.S. Congressman James Comer along with project partners, ceremonially inaugurated the BAFF system as part of a three-year evaluation to deter Asian carp from migrating through the navigation lock.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • Biologists crowd around a seine.
    Services biologists search through a seine for signs of Chucky madtom. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Appalachian fish added to endangered species list

    September 12, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Little Chucky Creek flows through scenic farmland of eastern Tennessee. Looking at it, you would never guess it’s the only place in the world where a tiny catfish, the Chucky madtom, lives. In fact, in the past 11 years, only three individuals have been found. Come September 8th, the madtom and three other Appalachian fish will be placed on the federal endangered species list.  Learn more...

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