skip to content

Tag: Critical Habitat

The content below has been tagged with the term “Critical Habitat.”

Endangered-Species-Act

  • Endangered mountain sweet pitcher plants need specific conditions to survive. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Critical Habitat under the Endangered Species Act

    When the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes an animal or plant for listing as endangered or threatened under the Endangered Species Act, we identify specific areas that contain the physical or biological features essential to its conservation. This is the species’ “critical habitat.”  Learn more...

Faq

  • A group of about a dozen small triangular shellfish in shallow water.
    Information icon Yellow lance in the Tar River in North Carolina. Photo by Sarah McRae, USFWS.

    Proposed critical habitat and draft economic analysis for yellow lance mussel

    February 5, 2020 | 8 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is proposing to designate 319 river miles of critical habitat for the yellow lance mussel in 11 units within Maryland, Virginia and North Carolina. What is critical habitat? Critical habitat is defined by the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as the specific geographic areas that contain features essential to the conservation of an endangered or threatened species and that may require special management and protection.  Learn more...

  • A brown mussel in a sandy river bottom
    Information icon Suwannee moccasinshell in its natural habitat. Photo by FWC.

    Suwannee moccasinshell Critical Habitat

    November 26, 2019 | 9 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is proposing to designate critical habitat for the Suwannee moccasinshell under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). What is the range of the Suwannee moccasinshell? The Suwannee moccasinshell, a small freshwater mussel, was historically present throughout much of the Suwannee River Basin; including the Suwannee River main stem in Florida, Santa River sub-basin in Florida, and the Withlacoochee River in Florida and Georgia.  Learn more...

  • A tiny greenish brown fish in front of a white ruler.
    Information icon Spring pygmy sunfish. Photo by Matt Laschet, USFWS.

    Spring pygmy sunfish designation of critical habitat

    May 29, 2019 | 5 minute read

    What is the spring pygmy sunfish and where does it occur? The spring pygmy sunfish is a spring-associated fish which is currently found in spring systems in the Tennessee River drainage in northern Alabama. Understanding of the distribution of the spring pygmy sunfish changed in 2015 with the discovery of the fish in Blackwell Swamp on Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge. Currently the spring pygmy sunfish is known from Beaverdam Spring/Creek in Limestone County and Blackwell Swamp in Madison County.  Learn more...

  • A small catfish with brown and white markings and long barbells extending from its mouth.
    Information icon Carolina madtom. Photo by Scott Smith and Fritz Rohde.

    Proposed Endangered Species Act findings for the Carolina madtom and Neuse River waterdog

    May 21, 2019 | 18 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) taking? The Service is proposing to list the Carolina madtom as an endangered species throughout its range and the Neuse River waterdog as a threatened species throughout its range with a 4(d) rule. We are also proposing designation of critical habitat for both species and releasing a draft economic analysis. What is the difference between threatened and endangered species? Under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), an endangered species is currently in danger of becoming extinct throughout all or a significant portion of its range, while a threatened species is likely to become endangered in the foreseeable future.  Learn more...

  • A small fish with brown and white spots swimming in front of small rocks.
    Information icon Trispot darter. Photo by Dick Biggins, USFWS.

    Final listing of the trispot darter, proposed 4(d) rule, proposed critical habitat

    January 30, 2019 | 12 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? Based on a review of the best available information and full status assessment, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is listing the trispot darter as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Service is also proposing a 4(d) rule and critical habitat. Check out the press release for this decision. What does it mean when a species is threatened?  Learn more...

News

  • A group of about a dozen small triangular shellfish in shallow water.
    Information icon Yellow lance in the Tar River in North Carolina. Photo by Sarah McRae, USFWS.

    Service proposes critical habitat for yellow lance mussel

    February 5, 2020 | 4 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to designate critical habitat for the yellow lance freshwater mussel within Maryland, Virginia and North Carolina, including 154 river miles of habitat that overlap with other federally protected mussels and fish. Only areas currently occupied by the mussel, listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 2018, are included in the proposal. A draft economic analysis on the impacts of this action indicates minimal costs for stakeholders and private landowners.  Read the full story...

  • A brown mussel in a sandy river bottom
    Information icon Suwannee moccasinshell in its natural habitat. Photo by FWC.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes critical habitat for freshwater mussel in Georgia and Florida

    November 26, 2019 | 4 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today proposed critical habitat for the Suwannee moccasinshell, a freshwater mussel protected as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) since 2016. The Service is also making available a draft economic analysis that assesses the potential impact of the Suwannee moccasinshell’s critical habitat designation on various sectors of the economy. Members of the public are invited to comment on the proposal to help inform future conservation of this aquatic species and its habitat in southwest Georgia and northwest Florida.  Read the full story...

  • A tiny greenish brown fish in front of a white ruler.
    Information icon Spring pygmy sunfish. Photo by Matt Laschet, USFWS.

    Service finalizes critical habitat for spring pygmy sunfish

    May 29, 2019 | 3 minute read

    After the discovery of a new population of spring pygmy sunfish and review of scientific information, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) has finalized critical habitat for the fish in three areas in Alabama: two in Limestone County, and one in Madison County. Two of these units are currently occupied by the sunfish, while the third unit was historically occupied, but is currently not inhabited by the species. The Service determined the unoccupied unit contains suitable habitat for the species.  Read the full story...

  • A small catfish with brown and white markings and long barbells extending from its mouth.
    Information icon Carolina madtom. Photo by Scott Smith and Fritz Rohde.

    Carolina madtom and Neuse River waterdog proposed for Endangered Species Act protection

    May 21, 2019 | 5 minute read

    The venom in the stinging spines of the Carolina madtom’s fins is so potent that it earned the freshwater catfish the scientific name, Noturus furiosus. The Neuse River waterdog salamander, with its black spots and red external gills, looks like something out of a science fiction movie. Both species are part of North Carolina’s rich biological heritage, and due to ongoing threats are now only found in limited and shrinking areas of the state.  Read the full story...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn