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Tag: Coosa River

The content below has been tagged with the term “Coosa River.”

Articles

  • A creek runs through a forest.
    Information icon Ohatchee creek, a tributary of the Coosa River in Alabama. Photo by Paul Johnson, ADCNR.

    Stalking the rare painted rocksnail

    April 12, 2018 | 6 minute read

    Calhoun County, Alabama — Biologists Nathan Whelan and Paul Johnson weren’t sure what they’d find when they launched their boat on that balmy Alabama morning. Whelan, a biologist currently serving as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s regional geneticist for the Southeast Region, was updating a scientific manuscript on the painted rocksnail, and needed the most recent information on its current range. The painted rocksnail is a rather cryptic-looking small-to-medium sized freshwater snail with yellowish-brown coloring.  Learn more...

  • Biologists in cold weather gear and waders collect lake sturgeon next to a dam.
    Information icon Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources employees and university students net lake sturgeon for sampling. Photo by USFWS.

    Lake sturgeon restoration in the Upper Tennessee River

    June 7, 2017 | 2 minute read

    The Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery works cooperatively with partners that include numerous states, non-governmental organizations, universities, and federal agencies to achieve restoration goals for lake sturgeon in the upper Tennessee and Coosa Rivers in the southeastern United States. Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery has been involved, since 1998, with lake sturgeon production to improve culture techniques, feeding, fish health, habitat assessment, and telemetry studies. Hatchery staff members Carlos Echevarria and Chad Shirey traveled to Shawano, Wisconsin, in April to spawn lake sturgeon in the Wolf River, and transport fertilized eggs back to Warm Springs.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A small fish with bright blue fins and orange coloring on its back.
    Information icon Trispot darter. Photo by Pat O'Neil, Geological Survey of Alabama.

    Frequently asked questions for the proposed listing of the trispot darter

    October 3, 2017 | 9 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? Based on a review of the best available information and full status assessment, the Service is proposing to list the trispot darter as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). What does it mean when a species is threatened? A species is listed in one of two categories: endangered or threatened. An endangered species is one that is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range.  Learn more...

News

  • A small fish with bright blue fins and orange coloring on its back.
    Information icon Trispot darter. Photo by Pat O'Neil, Geological Survey of Alabama.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes protection for rare darter in Coosa River Basin

    October 3, 2017 | 4 minute read

    A unique fish that acts like a tiny salmon needs protection. The trispot darter, a small, colorful fish found in parts of the Coosa River Basin in southeastern Tennessee, northern Georgia, and northern Alabama, is disappearing. Following a scientifically rigorous review of the darter, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is proposing to list the species as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Every year this short-lived fish, which is less than two inches long, swims upstream from the larger river habitat where it usually lives so it can spawn in the vegetation of small tributaries and seeps.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • Snail with a large orange and black shell.
    Interrupted rocksnail. Photo by Tom Tarpley, Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

    Roadmap to recovery

    November 10, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The interrupted rocksnail, rough hornsnail, and Georgia pigtoe mussel are all endangered species, having disappeared from 90 percent or more of their historical ranges, largely due to the damming of rivers where they live. All three are native to the Coosa River drainage in Alabama and North Georgia, the Georgia pigtoe also occurring in east Tennessee. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently came out with a road map for recovering these animals.  Learn more...

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