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Tag: Cheoah River

The content below has been tagged with the term “Cheoah River.”

Articles

  • Imperiled fish returns to the Cheoah River, marking another step in river’s restoration

    July 14, 2010 | 4 minute read

    Stocking a river with one of the nation’s rarest fish is a slow and gentle process. On a late-June day, biologist Steve Fraley lowers a clear-plastic bag full of water and fifty small, threatened fish called spotfin chub into Graham County’s Cheoah River, keeping the bag closed while the water temperature in the bag approaches the river’s temperature. After a few minutes, he opens the bag and mixes in some river water, continuing the acclimation process.  Learn more...

Podcasts

  • A NC biologist holding a sicklefin redhorse on a river bank in front of a hydroelectric dam.
    Information icon North Carolina biologist TR Russ holding an sicklefin redhorse. Photo by Mark Cantrell, USFWS.

    Rare fish recovery

    February 10, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Culminating a 20-year partnership with the state of Oregon, the Army Corps of Engineers, and private landowners, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently proposed removing the Oregon chub from the federal endangered species list. If it goes through, this would be the first fish delisted due to recovery. Fewer than 1,000 fish were known to exist when it was placed on the endangered species list.  Learn more...

  • A prehistoric looking fish with spines down its back and sides.
    Information icon Lake sturgeon. Photo by USFWS.

    Southern Appalachian aquatic diversity

    October 21, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The tiny fish in the water-filled plastic bag wouldn’t catch the eye of the casual observer, but to biologists they were part of a great hope. The fish were spotfin chub, a tiny, threatened fish, and these were carefully reared in a fish hatchery and bagged for transport and release into the Cheoah River where hopefully they would thrive.  Learn more...

  • A dozen dark mussels in a propagation tank with sandy substrate.
    Carolina heelsplitter mussels. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    North Carolina’s conservation aquaculture center

    August 4, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The Carolina heelsplitter mussel is one of the rarest animals in the country – with shrinking numbers found in only a handful of stream reaches across the Carolina piedmont. A conservation challenge, the mussel has declined as the piedmont, especially the area around Charlotte, has rapidly developed and streams have correspondingly degraded. However, one glimmer of hope is found outside Marion, North Carolina, inside what appears to simply be a large storage shed.  Learn more...

  • Three biologists wearing wet suits snorkeling in a stream.
    Aquatic biologists snorkeling on the Oconaluftee River in North Carolina. Photo by Gary Peeples.

    Reintroduction of spotfin chub

    July 28, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The spotfin chub is an unassuming little fish – growing up to about four inches long, with an unimpressive appearance, save during the breeding season when males turn an iridescent blue on the upper side of their bodies. However, this tiny fish is on the federal endangered species list and one biologists are trying to reestablish in Western North Carolina’s Cheoah River.  Learn more...

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