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Tag: Carolina Northern Flying Squirrel

The content below has been tagged with the term “Carolina Northern Flying Squirrel.”

Articles

  • Two dozen or more conservationists gather for a discussion at high altitude on a cold, foggy morning.
    Information icon Service biologist, Sue Cameron, gives instructions on planting red spruce. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Mapping the sky islands

    October 9, 2019 | 7 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina — On November 24, 1983, a Cessna 414A left Chicago en route to Sylva, North Carolina, a small town just south of the Blue Ridge Parkway. The plane’s last radar contact showed an altitude of 6,100 feet. About a mile later, at an altitude of about 6,000 feet, it crashed into the ridge between Waterrock Knob and Mount Lynn Lowery, in North Carolina’s Plott Balsam Mountains — the last mountain range before descending to Sylva.  Learn more...

  • A woman wearing a warm hat preparing to plant a tiny spruce tree seedling.
    Information icon Sue Cameron plants a red spruce at Whigg Meadow in Tennessee. Photo by Garry Peeples, USFWS.

    Women lead the effort on Appalachian mountain-top forests

    May 24, 2018 | 8 minute read

    The story of an ambitious effort to restore red spruce to the Southern Appalachians spearheaded by four women brought together by a commitment to the highest peaks east of the Mississippi River.  Learn more...

News

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.
    Information icon Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 53 Southeastern species

    June 20, 2019 | 9 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 53 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. These species are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before August, 19, 2019. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • A pudgy squirrel climbs down the side of a tree.
    Carolina northern flying squirrel. Photo by NCWRC.

    Carolina northern flying squirrel

    January 23, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. 2013 marks the 40th anniversary of the Endangered Species Act, an anniversary we’re marking by taking a closer look at some of the endangered species of the Southern Appalachians. For wildlife biologists, winter is often the down time of the year – a time to compile data from the year’s field work and set about the laborious, and indoor, task of writing reports.  Learn more...

  • A man wearing a backwards highland brewing company hat.
    Highland Brewing Company supporting mountain conservation. Cattail Peak hike, June 2010. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Highland Brewing Company steps up to help high elevation habitat

    June 8, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature It’s no secret that Asheville has established itself as a beer capital of the country, and the anchor of that status is Highland Brewing Company, the largest and oldest brewer in town. At the beginning of the summer, Highland will begin distributing its summer seasonal beer, Cattail Peak Wheat. Cattail Peak sits in the Black Mountains, just north of the highest mountain in the Eastern United States – Mount Mitchell.  Learn more...

  • A pudgy squirrel climbs down the side of a tree.
    Carolina northern flying squirrel. Photo by NCWRC.

    Carolina northern flying squirrel

    March 23, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. In a mountain-top snow-covered parking area, a team of federal, state, and tribal wildlife biologists grab a ladder and begin marching through the snow and over frozen streams into the forest. By-in-large the winter work of wildlife biologists is focused on indoor activities, like less than glamorous report writing or planning for the next year’s field work. However, the dead of winter is when biologists working with the federally endangered Carolina northern flying squirrel grab their boots and their long underwear and hit the trail.  Learn more...

  • Bright purple flowers emerge from large bushes on the side of a mountain.
    Information icon Rhododendron on Roan Mountain. Photo by Jim Liestman, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Roan Mountain - a biological gem

    October 9, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The view from Jane Bald is impressive. On a good day. The day I was there, the fog was socked in, accompanied by a constant strong wind. Although the beautiful views were missing, we were able to watch the wind rush the fog through the neighboring gap as if we were watching a stream squeeze between a pair of rocks.  Learn more...

  • A winding road cuts through a forested mountain in fall colors.
    Cherohala Skyway. Photo by Dzmitry (Dima) Parul, CC BY 2.0.

    Getting rare flying squirrels across the Cherohala Skyway road

    February 27, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The Cherohala Skyway is a 36-mile road connecting Robbinsville, North Carolina with Tellico Plains, Tennessee. It’s scenic, curvy, and desolate, cutting across Nantahala and Cherokee National Forests with no amenities aside from bathrooms. This lonesome ribbon of road may not seem to impact wildlife, but try looking at it through the eyes of a flying squirrel. There are two subspecies of flying squirrels in the Southern Appalachians: the more common Southern flying squirrel, which is sometimes a pest in people’s homes, and the endangered northern flying squirrel, which lives only at extremely high elevations, including along the Cherohala Skyway.  Learn more...

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