skip to content

Tag: Carolina Madtom

The content below has been tagged with the term “Carolina Madtom.”

Articles

  • Biologists turn to pottery company to help imperiled East Tennessee fish

    May 19, 2009 | 3 minute read

    Biologists working to conserve the chucky madtom, an imperiled catfish known to exist only in East Tennessee’s Little Chucky Creek, have turned to a novel idea to help the fish – flowerpot saucers. The saucers were converted into artificial housing for the chucky madtom, a small fish which lives on stream bottoms. Biologists peppered the bottom of Little Chucky Creek with the shelters, much like one would put out bluebird boxes or bat houses.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A spotted black salamander with red tufts around its gills.
    Information icon A young Neuse River waterdog from the Little River, Johnston County, North Carolina. Photo by Jeff Beane.

    Reopening comment period for the Carolina madtom and the Neuse River waterdog

    July 29, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Check out the questions and answers published for the first comment period. Why is the Service opening a second comment period? On May 22, 2019, the Service requested that all interested parties submit written comments on a proposal to list the Carolina madtom as an endangered species and the Neuse River waterdog as a threatened species. The proposal also included critical habitat designations for both species and a 4(d) rule for the Neuse River waterdog.  Learn more...

  • A small catfish with brown and white markings and long barbells extending from its mouth.
    Information icon Carolina madtom. Photo by Scott Smith and Fritz Rohde.

    Proposed Endangered Species Act findings for the Carolina madtom and Neuse River waterdog

    May 21, 2019 | 18 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) taking? The Service is proposing to list the Carolina madtom as an endangered species throughout its range and the Neuse River waterdog as a threatened species throughout its range with a 4(d) rule. We are also proposing designation of critical habitat for both species and releasing a draft economic analysis. What is the difference between threatened and endangered species? Under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), an endangered species is currently in danger of becoming extinct throughout all or a significant portion of its range, while a threatened species is likely to become endangered in the foreseeable future.  Learn more...

News

  • A small catfish swimming above rocky substrate.
    Information icon Carolina madtom. Photo by D Biggins, former USFWS.

    Service reopens comment period on proposal to list at-risk North Carolina salamander and catfish species

    July 29, 2020 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is reopening the public comment period on a combined proposal to list the Neuse River waterdog salamander and the Carolina madtom catfish in North Carolina under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). In May 2019, the Service proposed listing the Carolina madtom as endangered and the Neuse River waterdog as threatened following a rigorous scientific review. Critical habitat was also proposed for both species.  Read the full story...

  • A small catfish with brown and white markings and long barbells extending from its mouth.
    Information icon Carolina madtom. Photo by Scott Smith and Fritz Rohde.

    Carolina madtom and Neuse River waterdog proposed for Endangered Species Act protection

    May 21, 2019 | 5 minute read

    The venom in the stinging spines of the Carolina madtom’s fins is so potent that it earned the freshwater catfish the scientific name, Noturus furiosus. The Neuse River waterdog salamander, with its black spots and red external gills, looks like something out of a science fiction movie. Both species are part of North Carolina’s rich biological heritage, and due to ongoing threats are now only found in limited and shrinking areas of the state.  Read the full story...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn