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Tag: Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office.”

Articles

  • A beach covered in sea turtle eggs and other debris washed ashore from Hurricane Dorian
    Information icon Debris and sea turtle eggs washed up by Hurricane Dorian at Archie Carr NWR. Photo by Erin Seney, UCF Marine Turtle Research Group.

    Dorian report: Sea-turtle nest losses could have been worse

    September 19, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Hurricane Dorian obliterated hundreds of sea-turtle nests at National Wildlife Refuges as it clawed north along the Atlantic coast earlier this month, officials with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) said. But it could have been much worse. The storm, wildlife refuge staff noted, had dissipated as it neared the fragile, sandy shores where turtles lay eggs. It obliterated some nests, but left others intact. Eroded sand dunes and a lost sea turtle egg at Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge.  Learn more...

  • Bright yellow flowers, not unlike a dandilion, extend from a chunky central stem
    Information icon St. Croix agave. Photo by Caroline Pott, East End Marine Park.

    Saving rare plants in the U.S. Virgin Islands

    August 14, 2019 | 3 minute read

    Like many other islands in the Caribbean, the history of St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands is inextricably bound up with the planting and harvesting of sugarcane. Decades of land clearing for sugar, as well as cotton and livestock, denuded the U.S. Virgin Islands of more than 90 percent of their native vegetation. Tropical lily-thorn. Photo by James Yrigoyen, USFWS. St. Croix agave (also called Egger’s century plant) and tropical lily-thorn are but two of the many plants that once flourished in the subtropical dry forests of St.  Learn more...

Caribbean

  • A vernal pool surrounded by bright purple flowers in the shadow of a forested mountain.
    Information icon Laguna Cartagena National Wildlife Refuge. Photo © José Almodóvar.

    Project evaluations

    The Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office promotes healthy wildlife and their habitat through a diverse group of programs: Endangered Species, Partners for Fish and Wildlife, Contaminants Program, Coastal Program and Project Evaluation.  Learn more...

  • A small lizard with a bright blue tail and brown/black striped body on sandy leaf litter.
    Information icon St. Croix ground lizard, (Ameiva polops). Photo by Jan Zegarra, USFWS.

    News

    News from the Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office.  Learn more...

  • A bright pink flower with broad, fuzzy green leaves.
    Information icon Vernonia proctorii. Photo by Omar Monsegur, USFWS.

    Stories

    Stories from Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office.  Learn more...

  • A forested mountain with spotty fog.
    Information icon Dewy forest in Utuado, Puerto Rico. Photo © José Almodovar.

    Wildlife

    Wildlife at the Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office.  Learn more...

  • An orange and black buttefly perched on a yellow flower
    Information icon Puerto Rican harlequin butterfly, (Atlantea tulita).Photo by Jan Zegarra, USFWS.

Faq

  • A close-up photograph of a grey and tan gecko standing on dark, organic soil
    Information icon Monito gecko. Photo by JP Zegarra, USFWS.

    Removal of the Monito gecko from the federal list of endangered and threatened wildlife

    October 2, 2019 | 4 minute read

    What action is the Service taking? Following an in-depth status review, the Service is finalizing its proposal to remove the Monito gecko from the federal list of endangered and threatened animals. The Service has determined that the Monito gecko is recovered and no longer warrants listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). This decision is based on the best available science for the species. How are the endangered and threatened classifications defined?  Learn more...

News

  • Two light tan and grey reptiles with dark eyes walking on organic soil.
    Information icon A pair of Monito geckos. Photo by JP Zegarra, USFWS.

    A salvo de extinción el geco de Monito

    October 2, 2019 | 4 minute read

    El geco o salamanquita de Monito, un reptil pequeño resiliente que sólo se encuentra en la Isla de Monito en el Mar Caribe, está oficialmente recuperado gracias a los esfuerzos de conservación entre el Servicio Federal de Pesca y Vida Silvestre (USFWS, por sus siglas en inglés) y el Departamento de Recursos Naturales y Ambientales de Puerto Rico (DRNA). Ahora la especie es abundante y no requiere la protección de la Ley Federal de Especies en Peligro de Extinción (ESA, por sus siglas en inglés).  Read the full story...

  • Two light tan and grey reptiles with dark eyes walking on organic soil.
    Information icon A pair of Monito geckos. Photo by JP Zegarra, USFWS.

    Monito gecko saved from the brink of extinction

    October 2, 2019 | 3 minute read

    The Monito gecko, a resilient little lizard that lives only on Monito Island in the Caribbean Sea, is officially recovered thanks to an effective conservation partnership between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources (PRDNER). The species is now so abundant that it no longer warrants protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Monito Island is an uninhabited and mostly inaccessible island of only about 36 acres.  Read the full story...

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