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Tag: Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office.”

Articles

  • Bright yellow flowers, not unlike a dandilion, extend from a chunky central stem
    Information icon St. Croix agave. Photo by Caroline Pott, East End Marine Park.

    Saving rare plants in the U.S. Virgin Islands

    August 14, 2019 | 3 minute read

    Like many other islands in the Caribbean, the history of St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands is inextricably bound up with the planting and harvesting of sugarcane. Decades of land clearing for sugar, as well as cotton and livestock, denuded the U.S. Virgin Islands of more than 90 percent of their native vegetation. Tropical lily-thorn. Photo by James Yrigoyen, USFWS. St. Croix agave (also called Egger’s century plant) and tropical lily-thorn are but two of the many plants that once flourished in the subtropical dry forests of St.  Learn more...

Caribbean

  • A vernal pool surrounded by bright purple flowers in the shadow of a forested mountain.
    Information icon Laguna Cartagena National Wildlife Refuge. Photo © José Almodóvar.

    Project evaluations

    The Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office promotes healthy wildlife and their habitat through a diverse group of programs: Endangered Species, Partners for Fish and Wildlife, Contaminants Program, Coastal Program and Project Evaluation.  Learn more...

  • A small lizard with a bright blue tail and brown/black striped body on sandy leaf litter.
    Information icon St. Croix ground lizard, (Ameiva polops). Photo by Jan Zegarra, USFWS.

    News

    News from the Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office.  Learn more...

  • A bright pink flower with broad, fuzzy green leaves.
    Information icon Vernonia proctorii. Photo by Omar Monsegur, USFWS.

    Stories

    Stories from Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office.  Learn more...

  • A forested mountain with spotty fog.
    Information icon Dewy forest in Utuado, Puerto Rico. Photo © José Almodovar.

    Wildlife

    Wildlife at the Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office.  Learn more...

  • An orange and black buttefly perched on a yellow flower
    Information icon Puerto Rican harlequin butterfly, (Atlantea tulita).Photo by Jan Zegarra, USFWS.

News

  • A tiny yellow/orange frog with big round eyes.
    Coqui Llanero. Photo by Luis J. Villanueva CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.

    Recovery plan for endangered Puerto Rican frog available

    August 12, 2019 | 2 minute read

    “Kee, kee,” a male coquí llanero softly sings from dusk to dawn in a Puerto Rican wetland. Hearing its high-pitched call is rare because the tiny frog is only found in one freshwater wetland in the municipality of Toa Baja, Puerto Rico. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has prepared a final recovery plan outlining actions to save this dime-sized frog, which has been federally listed as endangered since October 2012.  Read the full story...

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.
    Information icon Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 53 Southeastern species

    June 20, 2019 | 9 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 53 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. These species are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before August, 19, 2019. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

  • A birds-eye-view photograph of an inefficient rock dam.
    Information icon Represa Cambalache. Photo © William Hernández.

    El Servicio Federal de Pesca y Vida Silvestre comienza la remoción de la Represa de Cambalache del Río Grande de Arecibo

    March 20, 2019 | 3 minute read

    Arecibo, Puerto Rico — El Servicio Federal de Pesca y Vida Silvestre (Servicio) junto con el Departamento de Recursos Naturales y Ambientales de Puerto Rico (PRDRNA) y otros colaboradores, iniciaron la remoción de la Represa de Cambalache, localizada en el Río Grande de Arecibo. La remoción de esta represa conectará y restaurará 25 kilómetros del Río Grande de Arecibo a unas condiciones de hábitat más naturales, proveyéndole así a los peces y otras especies acuáticas un hábitat más saludable con un flujo de agua libre.  Read the full story...

  • A birds-eye-view photograph of an inefficient rock dam.
    Information icon Represa Cambalache. Photo © William Hernández.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service begins removal of Cambalache Dam to aid conservation of Río Grande de Arecibo

    March 20, 2019 | 2 minute read

    Arecibo, Puerto Rico — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (the Service), along with the Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources (PRDNER) and other partners, today began the removal of the Cambalache Dam. The removal of the low-rise dam will connect and restore 25 kilometers of riverine habitat to a more natural state, as well as provide fish and other aquatic species with a healthier, free-flowing stream. It will also rid the river of a safety hazard, decrease erosion and boost recreational opportunities upstream of Arecibo.  Read the full story...

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