skip to content

Tag: Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge

The content below has been tagged with the term “Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge.”

Articles

  • 2019 regional “Sense Of Wonder” award winner

    September 30, 2019 | 1 minute read

    It is with great pride we announce Patricia Midgett, visitor services manager at Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, located in South Carolina, as our 2019 Regional “Sense Of Wonder” Award recipient.  Learn more...

  • Radar image showing the eye of Hurricane Hugo impacting the South Carolina coast
    Information icon Hurricane Hugo satellite imagery, September 22nd, 1989. Radar map by NOAA/National Hurricane Center.

    Hurricane Hugo and the woodpeckers: the silver lining of a monster storm

    September 16, 2019 | 13 minute read

    As sad as it is to admit, September has almost become a month of dread for residents of the southeastern United States and the Caribbean. On guard 24⁄7, headlines from NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center with proclamations like “NOAA increases chance for above-normal hurricane season” create that all too familiar angst as residents sponge up every advisory issued by the National Hurricane Center. Woven together with data from satellites and sensors, citizens are fed an endless array of spaghetti models that are updated frequently, making real-time tracking possible for our ever-connected society.  Learn more...

  • Two dozen primary school students gather around an instructor and a small fire.
    Information icon Describing the benefits of prescribed fire. Photo by Durwin Carter, USFWS.

    Wood Magic happens at Sewee Visitor Center

    December 21, 2017 | 2 minute read

    Have you ever wondered how paper is made from trees? Do you know why it’s important to recycle paper? Do you know that when a log is cut at the saw mill everything is used to make different wood products? Why do foresters use prescribed burning for forested areas? What are some gifts from the forest? Just ask South Carolina a fifth graders who attended the Wood Magic Forest Fair at the the Service’s Sewee Visitor and Environmental Education Center in Awendaw, South Carolina in November.  Learn more...

  • A small green plant growing in a sand dune with bright red/pink stems.
    Seabeach amaranth at Onslow Beach, Camp Lejeune, NC. Photo by Lilibeth Serrano, USFWS.

    From Massachusetts to South Carolina, recovering seabeach amaranth

    December 7, 2017 | 6 minute read

    This is a story about people, places and a plant — but it’s more than just that. This is a story about faith in a tiny little seed and the huge potential for recovering a threatened species. First things first — the plant Most people have probably never heard of seabeach amaranth, but for such an obscure little dune plant, it bears a mighty burden. This low-growing annual colonizes newly disturbed habitats such as over-wash areas at the end of barrier islands and flat, low-lying areas along the foremost dunes.  Learn more...

  • The beach at Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge goes dark mid afternoon during the solar eclipse.
    Information icon Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuges goes dark during the total solar eclipse. Photo by Kristen Peters, USFWS.

    Dark delight

    August 23, 2017 | 5 minute read

    Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, South Carolina – The solar eclipse of 2017 seemed to approach slowly. In truth, it came hurtling toward the eastern edge of America at more than 1,000 mph, a 70-mile-wide swath of temporary nightfall that stopped traffic and quickened hearts.  Learn more...

  • A man and a woman stand in front of the welcome sign at a South Carolina refuge.
    Information icon Cindy Dohner, regional director of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services’ Region 4, and Greg Sheehan. He recently became the principal deputy director at the Service. Photo by Kristen Peters

    Director: Refuge ‘a natural treasure’

    August 23, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, South Carolina – Ask Greg Sheehan what he thinks about the nation’s wildlife refuges and be prepared to wait for his response. For Sheehan, principal deputy director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), something as important as the nation’s 500-plus refuges deserves a measured answer. They are that important. As he stood under the branches of a dead tree that had succumbed to the ocean at Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, Sheehan thought about America’s wild lands – the mountains, the prairies, the beaches that surrender to the tireless tides.  Learn more...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn