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Tag: Cane River

The content below has been tagged with the term “Cane River.”

Articles

  • A hand holding two orange/black mussels with gold plates with an identifying number.
    Information icon Appalachian elktoe from the Cane River. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Biologists return to pollution-plagued Cane River, making discovery

    September 12, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Aquatic biologists returning to Yancey County’s pollution-plagued Cane River made a surprising discovery recently – two live Appalachian elktoe mussels upstream of the town of Burnsville’s wastewater treatment plant which has been beset with problems. This marks the first time the endangered mussel has been documented upstream of where the plant discharges into the river. “The discovery is good news in that it highlights a trend we’ve seen in recent years of the elktoe expanding its range upstream.  Learn more...

News

  • A mussel with fringe around its opening partially burried in the sand on the river bottom.
    Information icon Appalachian elktoe in the Little River Translyvania County NC. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Wildlife agency completes review of Highway 19 widening project

    March 25, 2008 | 4 minute read

    In March, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service concluded its review of the proposed widening of U.S. Highway 19 between Interstate 26 and Spruce Pine, determining that the project would not jeopardize the existence of any threatened or endangered species in the area. The Service’s primary concern is the endangered Appalachian elktoe mussel, found in the Cane, North and South Toe, and Nolichucky Rivers of the Nolichucky River basin which covers all of Yancey and Mitchell Counties.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • Mountain Heritage High School nature trail

    September 22, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Over lunch one afternoon in a restaurant on the corner of the Burnsville, North Carolina town square, Jake Blood expounded on a vision of a Yancey County connected by trails, where one could walk from downtown Burnsville up to the top of Mount Mitchell. A notion, he explained, that would not only be good for outdoor recreation, but also the health of community members, and the local economy.  Learn more...

  • Fuzzy, freshly hatched birds curled up together for warmth in a nest.
    Newly hatched robins. Photo by Danna, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Orphaned birds

    August 29, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The idea of picking up a young bird that seems to be orphaned or in trouble may seem advisable but can often do more harm than good. If you come across a bird, the first thing to do is to determine if the bird really needs help. In most cases, a baby bird may be a fledgling, or one that has just left the nest and is learning to fly and its parent may be close by watching.  Learn more...

  • A woman in a pink shirt sits in the dirt planting flowers.
    Out of the container, into the ground. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Mountain Heritage High Schools Eco-club - what students are doing for their community

    May 11, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Yancey County’s Cane River was once home to part of a thriving population of endangered Appalachian elktoe mussels. Recently beset with problems, hopefully through careful stewardship it will once again become a vibrant and beautiful river. The Cane River also runs past Mountain Heritage High School, the only public high school in Yancey Country. This year marks the fourth anniversary, and thus the first full graduating class, of the high school’s Eco-Club.  Learn more...

  • Train wreck on the North Toe River

    August 14, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. It’s the telephone call a biologist never wants to get – the chemical spill, the fish kill, the accident that makes you stop everything else. The most recent was a train wreck along the North Toe River in Mitchell County. Fortunately no one was hurt. The train, carrying ethanol and propane among other things, derailed on the banks of the North Toe River, home to the endangered Appalachian elktoe mussel.  Learn more...

  • Three women in wet suits snorkeling in a shallow river.
    Oconaluftee River snorkelers. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Endangered Species Day 2008

    December 6, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This week we’re going to look at the recent Endangered Species Day celebration and the ongoing challenge to protect endangered species in the Southern Appalachians. There weren’t a lot of takers for snorkeling. It was the North Toe River, on Mitchell/Yancey County line and ten students from the local high school’s Eco-Club were in the river with Fish and Wildlife Service biologists, looking for mussels.  Learn more...

  • Sunset over waterbody.
    Information icon Night falls at Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Joy Campbell of Okefenokee Adventures.

    Toe River Valley River Trail

    November 30, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Today we’ll examine an effort to increase accessibility to one of the most beautiful corners of the Southern Appalachians. In Okefenokee Swamp National Wildlife refuge, there is little hiking, simply because there is little dry earth, however, visitors routinely traverse the refuge, camping in it’s backcountry and enjoying the alligators, turtles, and birds this southeast Georgia wilderness offers. Instead of being laced with hiking trails, the area is laced with paddling trails, with backcountry visitors paddling through the swamp from wooden camping platform to wooden camping platform.  Learn more...

  • A brown bird with purple wing tips floats on semi-frozen water.
    Female wood duck at Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge. Photo © Quincey Banks.

    Water Quality Woes in Western North Carolina

    November 9, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This week, we’re going to look at the precarious situation of our Southern Appalachian rivers. When you have a child, certain sacrifices are made, some of which are temporary. Since our daughter’s birth more than two years ago, our canoe, which used to get frequent use, languished in the basement, getting used only as a convenient basement shelf.  Learn more...

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