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Tag: Bunched Arrowhead

The content below has been tagged with the term “Bunched Arrowhead.”

Articles

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.

    A unique mountain refuge protects endangered wetlands and the wildlife within

    August 24, 2017 | 8 minute readEast Flat Rock, North Carolina – It’s not much to look at really. Nothing about this all-too-familiar stretch of Southern blacktop indicates that a rare, beautiful and endangered flower thrives just beyond the railroad tracks. There’s a convenience store, a small engine repair shop, a few modest homes. General Electric makes lights at a factory up the road. Bat Fork Creek meanders nearby. Below the tracks, though, in an Appalachian mountain bog, bunched arrowheads rise from soggy ground. Learn more...

    Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

News

  • A spiny flower with thin, bright purple petals.

    2016 National and Regional Recovery Champions

    May 19, 2017 | 8 minute readOn Endangered Species Day, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southeast Region celebrates the contributions and achievements of our nationally recognized Recovery Champions and regionally recognized Recovery Champions. These dedicated individuals have devoted themselves to recovering endangered and threatened animals and plants, and the Service is grateful for their hard work. 2016 National Recovery Champions Chris Lucash, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Chris Lucash in the field monitoring for red wolves. Read the full story...

    Smooth Purple Coneflower, Echinacea laevigata. Photo by Suzanne Cadwell, CC BY-NC 2.0.

  • A grass-like plant with white flowers emerges from the marsh.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes to expand bog conservation in North Carolina

    November 22, 2016 | 5 minute readAsheville, North Carolina – The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service seeks public input on its proposal to expand the acquisition boundary for Mountain Bogs National Wildlife Refuge. “Since Mountain Bogs National Wildlife Refuge was established in 2015, we’ve heard from numerous private landowners interested in supporting the refuge through land sales and donations,” said Andrew Hammond, Refuge Manager. “If approved, this proposed expansion would increase opportunities to work with those landowners. Read the full story...

    The proposed expansion would allow a population of the endangered bunched arrowhead to be conserved as part of Mountain Bogs National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

  • Three mussels in hand with identification numbers

    Fish and Wildlife Service announces $37.2 million in grants to boost state endangered species conservation efforts

    August 13, 2015 | 8 minute readThe U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced $37.2 million in grants to 20 states to support conservation planning and acquisition of vital habitat for threatened and endangered species across the nation. The grants, awarded through the Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund, will benefit numerous species, ranging from the Cahaba shiner to the red-cockaded woodpecker. Five southeasterm states received a combined total of $4,112,981 in grants - - Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, North Carolina, and Tennessee. Read the full story...

    Winged mapleleaf mussels tagged for monitoring purposes can be found in the Saline river in Arkansas. Photo by Sarah Sorenson, USFWS.

  • A small brown fish caught in a stream sitting in a plastic bin for measurement.

    Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 23 Southeastern species

    June 6, 2009 | 5 minute readThe Service plans to conduct five-year status reviews of 15 endangered and 8 threatened species occurring in one or more of 10 states. These five-year reviews are conducted to ensure that listing classifications under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) are accurate. Any interested party is invited to provide information and comments pertaining to these species. Written comments and information related to these five-year reviews must be received on or before September 4, 2009. Read the full story...

    Endangered Etowah darter. Photo by USFWS.

Podcasts

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.

    Mountain Bogs National Wildlife Refuge establishment

    May 4, 2015 | 2 minute readTranscript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This past spring Mountain Bogs National Wildlife Refuge became America’s 563rd refuge. National Wildlife Refuges are lands managed by, or in partnership with, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for the conservation of fish, wildlife, and plants. This new national wildlife refuge is devoted to the conservation of southern Appalachian mountain bogs, one of the rarest and most imperiled habitats in the United States. Learn more...

    Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

  • A brown bird with purple wing tips floats on semi-frozen water.

    Birding at Ochlawaha bog

    March 7, 2012 | 2 minute readTranscript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The dry, late-winter brush covering the field was several feet high as we walked across, side-by-side, looking for birds. Then, with startling suddenness, a bird shot out of the brush, flying for several yards before settling back down to earth. It was a woodcock, a gamebird, and for the knowing observer, her flush gave away the existence of her nest, hidden on the ground and holding a pair of eggs. Learn more...

    Female wood duck at Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge. Photo © Quincey Banks.

  • A grass-like plant with white flowers emerges from the marsh.

    Bunched arrowhead

    March 21, 2011 | 2 minute readTranscript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. What simply looks like a swampy patch of land beside a farm field in Henderson County was actually once home to the most endangered plant in western North Carolina. Bunched arrowhead is currently known from only two counties in the entire world - Henderson County, North Carolina and Greenville County, South Carolina. It’s a small plant, growing up to 30 centimeters tall, produces small white flowers in early summer and usually grows in flooded soils. Learn more...

    Bunched arrowhead. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

  • Green grass-like vegetation emerges from standing water.

    Former farmland restored to rare habitat

    March 7, 2011 | 2 minute readTranscript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. At first glance it appears to be merely a patch of woods and farm field beside an established Flat Rock neighborhood. However, to biologists it’s Ochlawaha bog, a degraded remnant of one of the rarest natural communities in North America, and it’s in the beginning stages of a resurgence. Biologists estimate around 500 acres of Southern Appalachian bogs remain, and their importance is heightened by the fact they’re often home to greatly imperiled species. Learn more...

    Bunched arrowhead. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

  • A grass-like plant with white flowers emerges from the marsh.

    Ochlawaha bog - conserving one of our rarest habitats

    April 13, 2010 | 2 minute readTranscript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature We all know endangered species are rare. But there’s rare and then there’s rare. Bunched arrowhead is an endangered plant found only in two counties. In the entire world. Henderson County, North Carolina, and Greenville County, South Carolina. It lives in Southern Appalachian bogs one of the rarest natural communities on the planet, with only about 500 acres remaining in North Carolina. Learn more...

    The proposed expansion would allow a population of the endangered bunched arrowhead to be conserved as part of Mountain Bogs National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

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