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Tag: Brown Pelican

The content below has been tagged with the term “Brown Pelican.”

Articles

  • Bird rookery now protected as part of St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge

    August 20, 2019 | 2 minute read

    Shell Point, Florida — St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge celebrated the acquisition of Smith Island by the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge at the refuge’s pavilion overlooking beautiful Apalachee Bay. It was an auspicious day, with pelicans sailing in front of participants as if to add their approval of the event. This small island, 20 acres or so, is about 90 percent saltmarsh, with the remainder containing a handful of small trees and bushes.  Learn more...

  • Thousands of pelicans dot an island landscape shot from above
    Information icon Aerial view of Queen Bess Island, which supports an important brown pelican rookery in Louisiana. Photo by Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

    Streamlined environmental compliance process benefits brown pelican rookery

    August 20, 2019 | 4 minute read

    “Good Queen Bess” (a.k.a. Queen Elizabeth I) is credited with putting an end to a period of instability in mid-16th century England. Unfortunately, the tiny scrap of land in Louisiana that bears her name, Queen Bess Island, has been anything but stable. The island, located about two-and-a-half miles north of Grand Isle in Barataria Bay, has been sinking and eroding into the Gulf of Mexico. This is a matter of concern, as Queen Bess Island supports the third largest brown pelican rookery in Louisiana.  Learn more...

  • Thousands of pelicans dot an island landscape shot from above
    Information icon Aerial view of Queen Bess Island, which supports an important brown pelican rookery in Louisiana. Photo by Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

    A head start on healing

    July 16, 2019 | 4 minute read

    “Good Queen Bess” (a.k.a. Queen Elizabeth I) is credited with putting an end to a period of instability in mid-16th century England. Unfortunately, the tiny scrap of land in Louisiana that bears her name, Queen Bess Island, has been anything but stable. The island, located about two and a half miles north of Grand Isle in Barataria Bay, has been sinking and eroding into the Gulf of Mexico. This is a matter of concern, as Queen Bess Island supports the third largest brown pelican rookery in Louisiana.  Learn more...

  • Pelicans dot an island landscape shot from above with a single large pelican flying near the elevated camera.
    Information icon A brown pelican soars over others on Queen Bess Island, Louisiana. Photo by USFWS.

    Island restoration project and partnerships playing key role in future of the brown pelican

    June 14, 2019 | 3 minute read

    It may not be widely known that Louisiana, the Pelican State, had lost for almost a decade all of its namesake brown pelicans. In the early 1900’s Louisiana’s brown pelican population was estimated at 50,000 to 80,000. The widespread use of the insecticide DDT, however, took a huge toll on many bird species, including the brown pelican. By 1963, the bird was no longer found anywhere in the state. Today, the birds are back and their numbers around the state are staying steady.  Learn more...

  • Hundreds of shore birds line a sand bank with yellow oil boom in the background.
    Information icon North Breton Island, like many barrier islands, provides habitat for a wide range of bird species. Photo by Greg Thompson, USFWS.

    Restoring a buffet for birds on North Breton Island

    February 6, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Any mention of Louisiana frequently d conjures up images of delicious Cajun and Creole food – po’boys, gumbo, jambalaya and more. “Barrier islands” probably won’t pop into most people’s heads. But these islands are vitally important because they protect Louisiana communities from the impact of storms by acting like speed bumps, absorbing wind and wave energy. In addition, they provide essential habitat for birds and other wildlife. North Breton Island, part of the Breton National Wildlife Refuge, is one such barrier island.  Learn more...

  • A sandy beach with a tuft of vegetation following a jetty.
    Information icon Wolf Island. Photo by Nicole Vidal, USFWS.

    A sanctuary for at-risk birds

    July 12, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Wolf Island National Wildlife Refuge, Georgia – It rained heavily the night before, and the puffy white clouds on the horizon presaged more storms heading for the Georgia coast. At 7 am., with the tide receding, Tim Keyes hustled the Carolina Skiff into the Altamaha Sound where the same-name river meets the sea. Destination: the low-lying barrier islands off limits to the public, but teeming with at-risk, threatened and endangered birds.  Learn more...

  • The sun sets over a lush green marsh cut in half by a calm brackish channel.
    Information icon Salt marsh along the Altamaha River. Photo by Nicole Vidal, USFWS.

    Many partners work together to protect “the Amazon of the South” for generations to come

    July 12, 2017 | 13 minute read

    It meanders 137 miles through the wild heart of Georgia, a blackwater beauty that nourishes longleaf pine forests, cypress swamps, saltwater estuaries and the barrier islands that protect the Atlantic coast and migratory birds alike.  Learn more...

News

  • A large grey bird flying in front of a bright blue sky.
    Brown pelican. Photo by Jon. D. Anderson CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    May 19th is Endangered Species Day

    May 19, 2017 | 4 minute read

    Endangered Species Day was created by a Senate resolution in 2006 to encourage “the people of the United States to become educated about, and aware of, threats to species, success stories in species recovery, and the opportunity to promote species conservation worldwide.” It has since been celebrated in more than a dozen other countries as well. Today, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is proud to celebrate this annual day, and to honor the recovery work being done under the Endangered Species Act, (ESA) which protects endangered and threatened species and the ecosystems upon which they depend, and helps them recover.  Read the full story...

  • Two gloved workers wearing protective glasses soap up and clean an oiled bird.
    Two workers clean an oiled northern gannet. Photo by Bonnie Strawser, USFWS.

    First two birds, oiled from the Gulf spill, readied for release at Pelican National Wildlife Refuge

    May 9, 2010 | 3 minute read

    The first two oiled birds found in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill have been cleaned and are now recovered and ready for release. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will release the birds at 4 p.m. Monday, May 10, at Pelican National Wildlife Refuge on the Atlantic coast northeast of Vero Beach, Florida. Media wishing to cover the release of the birds should be at Centennial Tower in the refuge by 3:30 p.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • Two gloved workers wearing protective glasses soap up and clean an oiled bird.
    Two workers clean an oiled northern gannet. Photo by Bonnie Strawser, USFWS.

    Oil spill impacts that may be felt in the mountains

    May 25, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The Deep Horizon oil spill continues to make headlines as oil keeps pouring into the Gulf of Mexico and the slick spreads. In a glimmer of good news, the Fish and Wildlife Service recently reported that the first two oiled birds found in the oil spill, a northern gannet and a brown pelican, were cleaned and released at Pelican Island National Wildlife Refuge, safely on the east coast of Florida.  Learn more...

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