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Tag: Bog

The content below has been tagged with the term “Bog.”

Podcasts

  • A hand holds a tiny turtle with orange markings on either side of its neck.
    Young bog turtle in hand. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Grazing goats help with bog conservation

    July 14, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Mountain sweet pitcher plant is an endangered plant found in Southern Appalachian bogs, one of our rarest natural communities. Bog turtles are North America’s smallest turtle, and are also an imperiled species found in Southern Appalachian bogs. Aside from both being imperiled; aside from both living in bogs; one thing these two species have in common is they prefer areas with plenty of sunshine.  Learn more...

  • A hand holds a tiny turtle with orange markings on either side of its neck.
    Young bog turtle in hand. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Stimulus money goes to help Appalachian wildlife

    February 2, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Money from the federal government’s stimulus package is coming to help wildlife in the Southern Appalachians. $425,000 in grants from the Fish and Wildlife Service will go to local non-profits to improve fish and wildlife habitat on private lands in western North Carolina. The Little Tennessee Watershed Association will receive $75,000 to restore aquatic organism passage along tributaries of the Little Tennessee River in Macon and Swain Counties.  Learn more...

  • A tiny turtle with orange patches on the side of its throat crawls through the grass
    A young bog turtle in an Appalachian bog. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Cloacoal breathing - how do bog turtles stay underwater for so long?

    February 6, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Bog turtles, befitting their name, live in Appalachian bogs, where they like to burrow into the mud and muck of the wetland’s bottom, some of it quite thick and sticky. However, bog turtles, like all turtles, are air breathers, which begs the question if a bog turtle is two feet deep in mud and muck, how can it breathe?  Learn more...

  • A biologist takes notes in a notebook under an overcast sky.
    Sue Cameron takes notes near Jackson Park. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Saving, and improving, a Hendersonville wetland

    September 22, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. With all the attention given to development impacts in the mountains, this morning we’re going to look at how a development in Hendersonville, North Carolina will actually improve the situation for wildlife and bird watchers. There aren’t a lot of wetlands in the mountains. Our topography generally dictates that water quickly flows downhill to flatter lands, instead of pooling up and creating wetlands.  Learn more...

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