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Tag: Bog Turtle

The content below has been tagged with the term “Bog Turtle.”

Articles

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.
    Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    A unique mountain refuge protects endangered wetlands and the wildlife within

    August 24, 2017 | 8 minute read

    East Flat Rock, North Carolina – It’s not much to look at really. Nothing about this all-too-familiar stretch of Southern blacktop indicates that a rare, beautiful and endangered flower thrives just beyond the railroad tracks. There’s a convenience store, a small engine repair shop, a few modest homes. General Electric makes lights at a factory up the road. Bat Fork Creek meanders nearby. Below the tracks, though, in an Appalachian mountain bog, bunched arrowheads rise from soggy ground.  Learn more...

Podcasts

  • A tiny turtle with orange patches on the side of its throat crawls through the grass
    A young bog turtle in an Appalachian bog. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    More bog turtles

    March 9, 2016 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings, and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature Podcast. The fruit of the day search for bog turtles was meager. A lone individual. The search also turned up a snapping turtle, a suspected bog turtle predator. In fact, one of the perils of feeling through mud and muck for bog turtles is that instead of grabbing a bog turtle you wrap your hand around part of a snapping turtle.  Learn more...

  • A tiny turtle in the palm of a hand.
    A tiny bog turtle. Photo by Rosie Walunas, USFWS.

    Bog turtles

    February 16, 2016 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. It’s a cold day, with snow falling, as a group of biologists hikes across a southern Appalachian bog. Biologist Sue Cameron has found a hole in the ground that looks promising. Standing in the mud, she rolls up her sleeve, gets down on her knees, and sticks her hand in the hole, hoping to find a bog turtle. She comes up empty handed – but this trip wasn’t intended as a turtle search and the turtle happens to be one of the rarest in the United States.  Learn more...

  • A tiny turtle with orange patches on the side of its throat crawls through the grass
    A young bog turtle in an Appalachian bog. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Working lands for bog turtles

    July 13, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Western North Carolina is dotted with farm fields, and while most don’t even draw notice from those driving by, contrary to conventional wisdom some of these farm fields play a key role in conserving one of our rarest turtles – the bog turtle. Bog turtles are North America’s smallest turtle, and protected by the Endangered Species Act. These are two populations – a northern and southern, with the southern population centered on western North Carolina.  Learn more...

  • A tiny turtle with orange patches on the side of its throat crawls through the grass
    A young bog turtle in an Appalachian bog. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Tracking bog turtles

    June 1, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. I’ve often talked about southern Appalachian Mountain bogs, their rarity, and the rareness of many of the plants and animals found in them. There’s a bog south of Asheville that’s a bittersweet place. Despite development in its vicinity, it still hangs on, and in fact people in the community recognize its importance. What makes it a sad place is it used to be home to one of the best bog turtle populations in the southeast.  Learn more...

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.
    Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Mountain Bogs National Wildlife Refuge establishment

    May 4, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This past spring Mountain Bogs National Wildlife Refuge became America’s 563rd refuge. National Wildlife Refuges are lands managed by, or in partnership with, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for the conservation of fish, wildlife, and plants. This new national wildlife refuge is devoted to the conservation of southern Appalachian mountain bogs, one of the rarest and most imperiled habitats in the United States.  Learn more...

  • A tiny turtle in the palm of a hand.
    A tiny bog turtle. Photo by Rosie Walunas, USFWS.

    Farmers help bog turtles

    April 18, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Though the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service currently proposes creating a National Wildlife Refuge to protect rare Southern Appalachian Mountain Bogs, efforts to conserve these areas have been going on for decades, with farmers playing a key role. The bog turtle is North America’s smallest turtle, and this federally-protected species has suffered from both habitat loss and poaching to fuel an illegal pet trade.  Learn more...

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.
    Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Southern Appalachian poaching

    January 30, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. It seems this winter has seen a flurry of activity in the capture and prosecution of wildlife smugglers. In mid-December a German man was arrested for smuggling hundreds of live tarantulas, including protected species, into the United States through the U.S. mail. In late December two smugglers plead guilty to breaking federal law in connection to their attempt to smuggle Cuban pigeon eggs into the country, running the risk of bringing avian disease into the United States.  Learn more...

  • A hand holds a tiny turtle with orange markings on either side of its neck.
    Young bog turtle in hand. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Grazing goats help with bog conservation

    July 14, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Mountain sweet pitcher plant is an endangered plant found in Southern Appalachian bogs, one of our rarest natural communities. Bog turtles are North America’s smallest turtle, and are also an imperiled species found in Southern Appalachian bogs. Aside from both being imperiled; aside from both living in bogs; one thing these two species have in common is they prefer areas with plenty of sunshine.  Learn more...

  • Dozens of green plants in the shape of a pitcher.
    Information icon Clump of green pitcher plants. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Endangered Species Day 2010

    May 18, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature May 22 is Endangered Species Day. The phrase endangered species often brings to mind animals like panda bears and elephants, but the Southern Appalachians is home to a plethora of fascinating imperiled species. Our region is home to the spruce-fir moss spider – the world’s smallest tarantula, coming in about the size of a pencil eraser. It lives in the moss beds beneath the spruce-fir forests on our highest mountaintops.  Learn more...

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