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Tag: Black Pinesnake

The content below has been tagged with the term “Black Pinesnake.”

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  • A jet black snake with opaque white belly coiled up in the grass.
    Black pinesnake. Photo by Jim Lee, The Nature Conservancy.

    Reopening of comment period on proposed Critical Habitat designation for the black pinesnake

    October 10, 2018 | 10 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is reopening the comment period for 30 days on our 2015 proposed critical habitat designation for the federally threatened black pinesnake, and holding two informational public meetings: the first meeting will be on October 22, in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Pearl River Community College; the second will be on October 24, in Thomasville, Alabama, from 6:00 p.  Learn more...

News

  • A jet black snake with opaque white belly coiled up in the grass.
    Black pinesnake. Photo by Jim Lee, The Nature Conservancy.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reopens comment period and holds public meetings on proposed Critical Habitat for the black pinesnake

    October 10, 2018 | 4 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is reopening the public comment period on a proposal to designate critical habitat for the black pinesnake. Anyone interested in this proposal and the recovery of the black pinesnake is invited to comment for 30 days beginning October 11, 2018 and ending on November 13, 2018. The black pinesnake, a non-venomous constrictor, was federally listed as threatened in November 2015. It is currently found only in Mississippi and Alabama.  Read the full story...

  • A jet black snake with opaque white belly coiled up in the grass.
    Black pinesnake. Photo by Jim Lee, The Nature Conservancy.

    Black pinesnake added to threatened and endangered species list

    October 5, 2015 | 5 minute read

    The black pinesnake, which can grow to six feet in length and is now only found in parts of Mississippi and Alabama, will be protected as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). At the same time the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service also announced today a series of exemptions for certain activities that can benefit the species’ recovery, help keep working lands working, reduce regulatory burden and ensure landowners know what is expected.  Read the full story...

  • Coiled up black pinesnake on grass.
    Black pinesnake. Photo by Jim Lee, The Nature Conservancy.

    Service proposes to designate Critical Habitat and announces re-opening of comment period on proposed listing of black pinesnake

    March 10, 2015 | 18 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes to designate critical habitat for the black pinesnake under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). A proposed rule to list the black pinesnake as threatened was published in the Federal Register on October 7, 2014. At the same time, the Service also announces the availability of a draft economic analysis of the proposed critical habitat designation. The public is invited to submit comments on all of these actions through a 60-day comment period ending May 11, 2015.  Read the full story...

  • Coiled up black pinesnake on grass.
    Black pinesnake. Photo by Jim Lee, The Nature Conservancy.

    Service proposes to list the black pinesnake as threatened

    October 6, 2014 | 4 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to list the black pinesnake as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) with a proposed section 4(d) rule. If finalized, this 4(d) rule would exempt certain activities from the take prohibitions of the ESA that would positively affect black pinesnake populations and provide an overall conservation benefit to the snake. These activities include herbicide treatments, prescribed burning, restoration along river banks and stream buffers, and some intermediate timber treatments.  Read the full story...

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