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Tag: Black Bear

The content below has been tagged with the term “Black Bear.”

Articles

  • Two children with a camera peer out of the moon roof of a red truck.
    Information icon When a bear is spotted in a field, the caravan stops and Jack and Gretchen Boggs are among those taking pictures of the wild animal. Photo by Phil Kloer, USFWS.

    In search of the Bear Necessities

    July 5, 2017 | 4 minute read

    Dare County, North Carolina - The caravan of cars crunches slowly, single-file, down a narrow gravel road that leads deeper into Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge in North Carolina. Herons alongside the road stare at the passing cars, and the passengers stare back at the herons. Overhead a gliding hawk catches air drafts. Herons and hawks are all well and good. But we are here for bears. Black bears. “We’re not a zoo,” Cindy Heffley, a visitor services specialist for the U.  Learn more...

Podcasts

  • Two reddish black bear cubs hustle down a gravel path.
    You never know what you'll see along the road or in a nearby field or forest when you take the Alligator River Refuge tram tour. Photo by Jackie Orsulak.

    Living with bears

    June 15, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Bears have been in the news a lot recently, most notably related to a hiker who was pulled from his hammock by a bear in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. According to the Park Service’s report, the young man, and his father, who were traveling together, had properly stored their equipment, food, and packs on aerial food storage cables.  Learn more...

  • A large black bear looks inquisitively through the tall grass.
    Black bear at Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by USFWS.

    Managing bear conflicts

    February 3, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The Appalachian Trail crosses North Georgia’s Blood Mountain Wilderness, home to a historic, stone trail shelter; and the site of considerable weekend visitation. The Wilderness was also the scene of increasing bear-human interactions – something land managers try to avoid for the benefit of all involved. To turn that trend around, in 2012 the USDA Forest Service, which manages the Wilderness, began requiring the use of bear-resistant food canisters to carry garbage, toiletries, and food.  Learn more...

  • A large black bear looks inquisitively through the tall grass.
    Black bear at Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by USFWS.

    Living with bears

    October 21, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature With a rash of media reports of bear sightings across North Carolina, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission reminds residents not to panic and to remain calm if you see a black bear. Bears are not inherently dangerous and seeing a bear can be a once-in-a-lifetime experience for residents to appreciate from a safe distance. Sometimes a young bear accidentally finds its way into a town when the natural corridor, river or drainage ditch it’s traveling leads into a town.  Learn more...

  • A large black bear looks inquisitively through the tall grass.
    Black bear at Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by USFWS.

    Leads sought in dumping of bear carcass

    March 6, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is asking for your help determining who and why someone dumped a bear carcass marked in white paint onto a Buncombe County, North Carolina road. Anyone with information should call 1-800-662-7137. Callers may remain anonymous. A combined reward of $3,000 is offered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Forest Service for information leading to an arrest and conviction in the case.  Learn more...

  • CITES - a look at this wildlife conservation treaty

    April 20, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. People are fascinated by the zebra skin. It’s a prop I use when I talk to school groups about endangered species, though when I bring it out sometimes complete strangers come over for a closer look. The skin was confiscated by Fish and Wildlife Service inspectors at the Atlanta airport as it was being unlawfully imported. International trade in rare plants and animals, including that zebra skin, is governed by a treaty called the Convention on International Trade in Endangered species, or CITES.  Learn more...

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