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Tag: Birding

The content below has been tagged with the term “Birding.”

Articles

  • An aerial photograph of a river cutting through a marsh emptying into a the Gulf of Mexico.
    Information icon A View South over Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, Grand Bay, MS. Photo by USFWS.

    Gulf of Mexico Restoration Benefits Wetlands and Recreation

    June 24, 2020 | 5 minute read

    As we transition from American Wetlands Month through National Great Outdoors Month, it is the perfect time to showcase the restoration progress we continue to make in the Gulf of Mexico region. The Deepwater Horizon explosion occurred 10 years ago this spring and we’ve read many stories about the explosion and the sad impact the spill has had on wildlife and habitat. Oil fouled more than 1,300 miles of shoreline from Texas to Florida.  Learn more...

  • Nine birders looking into a tree-line along a road with cameras and binoculars
    Information icon Visitors lined up at the refuge to see the golden-crowned sparrow. Photo by Terri Jacobson, USFWS.

    Rare sparrow found at Red River Refuge

    June 1, 2020 | 2 minute read

    A golden-crowned sparrow, normally found on the west coast, showed up at Red River NWR in Louisiana for a photo shoot.  Learn more...

  • Aflock of seven birds flying over a pond
    Information icon Blue-winged teals. Photo by USFWS.

    Focus on birding

    May 8, 2020 | 5 minute read

    It’s not every day that you can help science and have a good time doing it. So, make the most of this day, Saturday, May 9. Saturday is International Migratory Bird Day; the 2020 theme is “Birds Connect Our World.” It’s also Global Big Day, 24 hours set aside to participate in a worldwide bird count that adds to a body of avian knowledge. Perhaps best of all: You can observe both days in your back yard.  Learn more...

  • An open gate surrounded by live oaks covered in Spanish moss.
    Information icon Altama Plantation. Photo by Nicole Vidal, USFWS.

    A gem for hunters and hikers alike

    July 12, 2017 | 4 minute read

    Brunswick, Georgia – Altama Plantation is perhaps the most critical, and intriguing, piece of property along the entire Altamaha River corridor. It was here in the early 1800s that plantation owner James Hamilton Couper introduced the Dutch system of tidal floodgates to grow rice. He planted sugar cane and built a refinery whose red-brick remains still stand. Couper, a noted scientist, also recorded the first eastern indigo snake, a threatened species which bears his name (Drymarchon couperi).  Learn more...

  • The sun sets over a lush green marsh cut in half by a calm brackish channel.
    Information icon Salt marsh along the Altamaha River. Photo by Nicole Vidal, USFWS.

    Many partners work together to protect “the Amazon of the South” for generations to come

    July 12, 2017 | 13 minute read

    It meanders 137 miles through the wild heart of Georgia, a blackwater beauty that nourishes longleaf pine forests, cypress swamps, saltwater estuaries and the barrier islands that protect the Atlantic coast and migratory birds alike.  Learn more...

Podcasts

  • A brown bird with purple wing tips floats on semi-frozen water.
    Female wood duck at Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge. Photo © Quincey Banks.

    Birding at Ochlawaha bog

    March 7, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The dry, late-winter brush covering the field was several feet high as we walked across, side-by-side, looking for birds. Then, with startling suddenness, a bird shot out of the brush, flying for several yards before settling back down to earth. It was a woodcock, a gamebird, and for the knowing observer, her flush gave away the existence of her nest, hidden on the ground and holding a pair of eggs.  Learn more...

  • A bird perched on a tree with a bright red head, white breast and grey feathers on its back
    Red-headed woodpecker. Photo by Courtney Celley, USFWS.

    Christmas bird count

    January 4, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The holidays — the gifts, the time with family and friends, the question of what to do when not eating or watching football. In 1900, one way to pass the time on Christmas day was to participate in a “side hunt,” where participants would choose sides, then go out and shoot as many birds as possible, the side with the most birds winning.  Learn more...

  • A very colorful bird perched on a bird feeder.
    Painted bunting. Photo by Evangelio Gonzalez, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    North Carolina birding trail enters the mountains

    September 11, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. We were hunting waterfowl, my three-year-old daughter and I, albeit in a completely benign way. It was early on a Saturday morning - too early for a three-year old to be up, but there was no changing that reality. In order to preserve someone’s peace and quiet, we left mom and baby in bed while we went out for an early bagel and the hope of finding a goose at Asheville’s Beaver Lake bird sanctuary.  Learn more...

  • A biologist takes notes in a notebook under an overcast sky.
    Sue Cameron takes notes near Jackson Park. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Saving, and improving, a Hendersonville wetland

    September 22, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. With all the attention given to development impacts in the mountains, this morning we’re going to look at how a development in Hendersonville, North Carolina will actually improve the situation for wildlife and bird watchers. There aren’t a lot of wetlands in the mountains. Our topography generally dictates that water quickly flows downhill to flatter lands, instead of pooling up and creating wetlands.  Learn more...

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