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Tag: Bird

The content below has been tagged with the term “Bird.”

Articles

  • A black bird with white speckling and red eyes in a biologist’s hand.
    Information icon Eastern black rail being banded. Photo credit: Christy Hand, SCDNR.

    Secrets of the Marsh: A Partnership to Protect a Rare Bird

    July 9, 2021 | 3 minute read

    The Eastern black rail is more often heard than seen, if observed at all. This small, secretive marsh bird is listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act and lives in shallow, grassy wetlands along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts. In South Carolina, the black rail has found a home in a unique wetland system with more than 300 years of human involvement. While this presents a daunting challenge, a recent South Carolina Coastal Program partnership put conservation on the ground and preserved a cultural heritage.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A blackish/navy blue bird with bright red eyes and white markings on its wings
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo by Christy Hand, SCDNR.

    Eastern black rail - final 4(d) rule

    October 7, 2020 | 5 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), has broad authority to issue regulations for the conservation of threatened species. The ESA provides a specific list of prohibitions for endangered species under section 9, but does not automatically provide these same prohibitions to threatened species. Section 4(d) of the ESA allows the Service to establish prohibitions or exceptions to prohibitions for threatened species. The intent of any 4(d) rule is to provide for the conservation of a threatened species by allowing regulatory flexibility under the ESA.  Learn more...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Eastern black rail final listing as a threatened species

    October 7, 2020 | 14 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is finalizing a rule to protect the eastern black rail, a small secretive marsh bird native to the United States, as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Partially migratory, the eastern black rail is historically known to exist in 35 states east of the Rocky Mountains, Puerto Rico, Canada, Brazil and several countries in the Caribbean and Central America.  Learn more...

  • A small black bird flies over a lush green marsh
    Information icon Eastern black rail in flight – Texas, April 2016. Photo © Jesse Huth, used with permission, Huth Avian Services.

    Proposed listing for the eastern black rail

    October 5, 2018 | 12 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is proposing to protect the eastern black rail, a small secretive marsh bird native to the United States, as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Partially migratory, the eastern black rail is known in as many as 36 states, plus multiple territories and countries in the Caribbean and Central and South America. It is one of four subspecies of black rail, which live in salt, brackish, and freshwater marshes.  Learn more...

News

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Service finalizes listing the eastern black rail as threatened under the Endangered Species Act

    October 7, 2020 | 4 minute read

    The eastern black rail, a small, secretive marsh bird historically known to exist in 35 states east of the Rocky Mountains, Puerto Rico, Canada, Brazil, and several countries in the Caribbean and Central America, will be listed as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The final listing includes a rule that will help ensure beneficial conservation actions continue, while minimizing impacts to landowners and other stakeholders. Critical habitat designation for the eastern black rail was deemed not prudent.  Read the full story...

  • A small yellow breasted bird with grey feathers.
    Information icon Kirtland’s warblers nest exclusively in jack pine stands. Photo by Joel Trick, USFWS.

    Partners celebrate successful recovery of beloved songbird

    October 8, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Bird enthusiasts from around the world travel to northern Michigan in hopes of catching sight of a Kirtland’s warbler, a small songbird once poised on the brink of extinction. Now the species is thriving thanks to decades of effort by a diverse group of dedicated partners. Due to the species’ remarkable recovery, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced that it no longer warrants protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  Read the full story...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Service proposes to list the eastern black rail as threatened under the Endangered Species Act

    October 5, 2018 | 5 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and its partners are working to protect a small, secretive marsh bird that is in steep decline. Some populations of the eastern black rail along the Atlantic coast have dropped by as much as 90 percent, and with a relatively small total population remaining across the eastern United States, the Service is proposing to list the subspecies as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  Read the full story...

Wildlife

  • Three brown birds swimming on still water
    Information icon American wigeon. Photo by Mike Wintroath, AGFC.

    American wigeon

    American wigeon are a medium-sized dabbling duck, and males have a distinctive white patch on their head that historically gave them the nickname “baldpate.” This species can be aggressive when competing for food and is a highly flexible forager, equally at home stealing food from diving ducks in deep water or grazing on turf grasses in urban areas. Conservation status Low concern. Range American wigeons occur across all four North American flyways, but they are most abundant in the Pacific and Central flyways.  Visit the species profile...

  • A brown and grey duck with a black belly standing at the entrance to a large birdhouse
    Information icon Black-bellied whistling duck. Photo by Stacey Hayden, USFWS.

    Black-bellied whistling duck

    The black-bellied whistling duck is sometimes described as part goose and part duck because of its rather peculiar physical features and behaviors. Like many goose species, black-bellied whistling ducks graze on grasses in upland areas, but they also nest in tree cavities similar to wood ducks. This species is highly gregarious, adaptable to using urban areas, and highly recognizable due to its pink bill and legs. Conservation Status Low concern.  Visit the species profile...

Wildlife-and-You

  • A woman dressed in warm clothes in a field with tall grass looks through binoculars.
    Information icon Service biologist Sue Cameron searches for birds. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Backyard Habitat: Birds

    Are you a backyard birder or interested in backyard birding? Here are some tips for attracting beautiful birds to your backyard!  Learn more...

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