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Tag: Big Brown Bat

The content below has been tagged with the term “Big Brown Bat.”

Articles

  • A bat with a fuzzy head and large round eyes clings to the handler’s gloved hand
    Information icon Robin is an Egyptian fruit bat. Photo by Nicole Vidal, USFWS.

    They come out at night

    August 10, 2017 | 4 minute read

    The 2017 blitz, like those that preceded it, attempted to spread a little bat understanding – and, perhaps, some bat love. Bat experts invited the public to spend a few moments regarding a creature that’s suffered from a PR problem. Most folks just don’t understand bats, or what they do.  Learn more...

  • A brown bat attached to the roof of a cave with white fuzz around its nose
    Information icon In this 2016 photo, a tri-colored bat with evidence of White Nose Syndrome (WNS) hibernates on the wall of the Black Diamond Tunnel in the North Georgia mountains. Photo by Pete Pattavina, USFWS.

    Malady deadly to bats found in North Carolina

    February 9, 2011 | 4 minute read

    White-nose syndrome, the disease that has killed hundreds of thousands of bats in the Eastern United States, has been discovered in a retired Avery County mine and in a cave at Grandfather Mountain State Park, marking the arrival of the disease in North Carolina. “White-nose syndrome is confirmed in Virginia and Tennessee, so we expected we would be one of the next states to see the disease,” said Gabrielle Graeter, a biologist with the N.  Learn more...

News

  • A brown bat attached to the roof of a cave with white fuzz around its nose
    Information icon In this 2016 photo, a tri-colored bat with evidence of White Nose Syndrome (WNS) hibernates on the wall of the Black Diamond Tunnel in the North Georgia mountains. Photo by Pete Pattavina, USFWS.

    White-nose syndrome decimates North Carolina’s bats

    April 29, 2013 | 4 minute read

    Biologists with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) have determined that white-nose syndrome (WNS) continues to decimate bat populations in western North Carolina, with some infected locations showing up to a 95 percent decline in hibernating bats over the past one to two years. The disease, which has been confirmed in seven counties in western North Carolina, does not affect people. Wildlife Commission biologists surveying bat populations have documented declining bat populations by site.  Read the full story...

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