skip to content

Tag: Beaches and Dunes

The content below has been tagged with the term “Beaches and Dunes.”

Articles

  • Dozens gather for a ribbon cutting ceremony.

    Bon Secour trail reopening underscores priority of access to public lands

    March 15, 2018 | 2 minute readBon Secour National Wildlife Refuge Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge in Gulf Shores is not only one of the largest undeveloped parcels of land on the Alabama coast, it’s also one of the few places where you can go from the primary dunes along the Gulf of Mexico to a maritime forest and uplands. “It’s like a snapshot of what the Gulf coast was like hundreds and thousands of years ago,” says Jereme Phillips, the refuge manager. Learn more...

    Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge staff members Jereme Phillips and Brittany Petersen mark the reopening of the Jeff Friend Trail with help from the Blue Goose, the mascot of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Photo by Nanciann Regalado, USFWS.

  • two yellow flowers growing out of very sandy soil.

    Sowing plants to reap dunes

    February 28, 2018 | 4 minute readRestoration biologist Kate Healy felt the sun on her face as she stood on a sandy stretch of beach along Alabama’s Gulf coast. It was an unseasonably warm day on Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge, and Healy, a biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Gulf Restoration Office in Fairhope, Alabama, was ready to get to work. Kate Healy and Jackie Sablan plant ground chokecherry at Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge in Alabama. Learn more...

    Ground chokecherry. Photo by USFWS.

  • A tiny white and brown mouse held by a biologist.

    The mouse that roared

    December 13, 2017 | 7 minute readPensacola, Florida – Pity the big-eared, bug-eyed Perdido Key Beach mouse. Buffeted by hurricanes, threatened by development, and stalked by cats, the thumb-sized mouse had all but disappeared from the sliver of beach outside this bustling Gulf Coast town. A decade ago, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service feared extinction. Paw prints from a Perdido Key beach mouse. Photo by USFWS. Today? “The mouse is doing pretty well right now,” said Kristi Yanchis, a Service biologist and beach mouse expert. Learn more...

    Perdido Key beach mouse. Photo by USFWS.

  • A small green plant growing in a sand dune with bright red/pink stems.

    From Massachusetts to South Carolina, recovering seabeach amaranth

    December 7, 2017 | 6 minute readThis is a story about people, places and a plant — but it’s more than just that. This is a story about faith in a tiny little seed and the huge potential for recovering a threatened species. First things first — the plant Most people have probably never heard of seabeach amaranth, but for such an obscure little dune plant, it bears a mighty burden. This low-growing annual colonizes newly disturbed habitats such as over-wash areas at the end of barrier islands and flat, low-lying areas along the foremost dunes. Learn more...

    Seabeach amaranth at Onslow Beach, Camp Lejeune, NC. Photo by Lilibeth Serrano, USFWS.

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn