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Tag: Bats

The content below has been tagged with the term “Bats.”

Podcasts

  • Thousands of bats flying together at dusk.
    Information icon Bats flying. Photo by Ann Froschauer, USFWS.

    BatFest is upon us

    July 18, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. BatFest 2011 is nearly upon us. Sunday, July 31st from 2:00 to 5:30 at the North Carolina Forest Service’s training center in Crossnore, North Carolina you’ll have your chance to learn everything you wanted to know about bats. The public event kicks off the 2011 Bat Blitz, a three-day event with wildlife biologists from across the Eastern United States coming to Western North Carolina to collect data on the area’s bat populations.  Learn more...

  • Three furry bats hang from the wet ceiling of a cave.
    Information icon Trio of tri-colored bats covered in dew. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    BatFest

    July 4, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Bats are an incredibly important part of our world – helping control insect populations and pollinating plants. Despite all of this, bats still suffer from an image problem based on ill-conceived notions that they’re aggressive toward people and are rampant transmitters of rabies However, bat biologists are offering you a chance to have all your questions about bats answered during BatFest 2011, an educational event from 2 to 5:30 p.  Learn more...

  • A fuzzy bat bearing its teeth with white fungus covering its face.
    Information icon Little brown bat from Avery County with White Nose Syndrome. Photo by Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC.

    White-nose syndrome in Kentucky

    May 1, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature In addition to horses and bourbon, Kentucky is known for its caves, and indeed, is home to Mammoth Cave National Park, with the world’s longest known cave system. Hand in hand with the incredible number of caves is the fact that Kentucky is an incredibly important state for our nation’s bat populations. That’s why the recent news that the bat disease white-nose syndrome was discovered in the state is especially painful.  Learn more...

  • A river runs through a valley in fall.
    Information icon Eastern small-footed bat. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    New bats for endangered species list?

    April 18, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The spread of white-nose syndrome, the deadly bat disease, brings with it many questions, one of the most important, what will become of our bat populations? Parts of the eastern United States have already seen dramatic die-offs in bat numbers. In response to white-nose syndrome, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, which maintains the U.S. list of endangered species, has been asked to add two more bat species to that list.  Learn more...

  • A furry brown bat baring its teeth.
    Tri-colored bat from the 2011 bat blitz. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Bat blitz 2011

    November 3, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. In a tiny meeting room in Nebo, North Carolina, at the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, planning began in earnest for the 2011 Bat Blitz – an effort that will bring dozens of biologists from across the Southeast to North Carolina’s Avery County for an intensive three days of collecting information on the area’s bat populations. Nearly 10 years old, the bat blitz is becoming a tradition among southern biologists.  Learn more...

  • A woman in chest waiters standing in a stream reaches out to touch a mist net
    Information icon Service biologist Sue Cameron helps set up a mist net. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Bat monitoring on the Davidson River

    August 11, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. We sat in the darkness on the edge of the Davidson River in North Carolina’s Transylvania County. Every few minutes someone would turn on a bright headlamp and scan the net that was suspended across the river, searching for a bat that had gotten tangled in the net’s thin threads. It was part of an effort, led by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, to monitor the state’s bat populations and keep a lookout for signs of the deadly bat malady known as White Nose Syndrome.  Learn more...

  • A furry, brown bat resting in the crevace of a cave.
    Information icon Hibernating Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis). Photo by Ann Froschauer, USFWS.

    White nose syndrome in Tennessee

    April 6, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Recently the president of a local caving club sat in my office, dressed in rugged Carharts, seeming like he was on his way to a cave. He was lamenting a picture he had brought to share. Taken in an East Tennessee cave, it showed a bat with a white tuft on its nose, an indicator of white nose syndrome.  Learn more...

  • A small brown bat on the roof of a cave with a fuzzy white fungus on its nose.
    Information icon A tri-color bat in the Avery County with white-nose syndrome. Photo by Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC.

    North Carolina prepares for White Nose Syndrome

    February 23, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. As winter sets in, biologists in North Carolina are busy preparing for the possible arrival of White-Nose Syndrome, or WNS. WNS is a mysterious affliction that is nearly always fatal to bats. It was first documented in a New York cave in 2006 and has since spread north and south, killing hundreds of thousands of bats. The affliction is associated with a newly described fungus which often forms white tufts on the muzzles of infected bats.  Learn more...

  • A fuzzy bat bearing its teeth with white fungus covering its face.
    Information icon Little brown bat from Avery County with White Nose Syndrome. Photo by Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC.

    Southern Appalachians face white nose syndrome

    July 10, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. White nose syndrome, an affliction of unknown origin that is fatal to bats, has been confirmed in two Virginia counties, the first cases in the Southern Appalachians. First documented in New York in 2006, WNS has killed tens of thousands of bats as it spread north and south. The affliction takes its name from the white-tufts of fungus that often grow on the muzzles of infected bats, however, it’s unknown if this fungus is the cause of the problem or merely taking advantage of a diseased and weakened bat.  Learn more...

  • Several wind turbines in front of a sunset.
    Information icon The DOE/Sandia Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility at the Reese Technology Center in Lubbock, Texas. Photo by Sandia Labs, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Research shows it isn’t just impacts that kill bats at wind turbines

    April 24, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. While many hold up wind energy as an ideal green energy source, many in the wildlife conservation community are a little hesitant with their enthusiasm. The reason being, those spinning blades can be lethal to flying animals. Much of the attention about wind turbine impacts to wildlife has focused on birds, but clearly birds aren’t the only animals that fly, and bats have suffered before those spinning blades as well.  Learn more...

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