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Tag: Bats

The content below has been tagged with the term “Bats.”

Podcasts

  • Dozens of brown bats with long ears attached to the roof of a cave in a cluster.
    Cluster of Virginia big-eared bats (Corynorhinus townsendii virginianus). Photo by Dave Riggs, CC BY-SA 2.0.

    North Carolina’s endangered bats

    September 10, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. 2013 marks the 40th anniversary of the Endangered Species Act, an anniversary we’re marking by taking a closer look at some of the endangered species of the Southern Appalachians. In the eastern United States, it’s hard to talk about bat conservation without mentioning white nose syndrome – the bat disease that’s decimating many species as it spreads from the New York area where it was first discovered.  Learn more...

  • A small furry bat in a crevice of a cave with patches of white fungus on its face and shoulder.
    A northern-long-eared bat with suspected White Nose Syndrome. Photo by Steve Taylor, University of Illinois.

    North Carolina bat decline

    January 30, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The biologists eyed the bat box on the banks of the Tuckasegee River. Counter in hand, they tallied how many bats were using the box. This is the fourth year they’ve done these counts at a string of bat roosting boxes along the river. And this spring they witnessed a precipitous decline in the number of bats using the sites from past years.  Learn more...

  • A furry, brown bat resting in the crevace of a cave.
    Hibernating Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis). Photo by Ann Froschauer, USFWS.

    Monitoring bats along the Tuckasegee River

    May 1, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. A pair of biologists sat patiently beside the Tuckasegee River, staring at a set of wooden boxes mounted on a wooden pole on the rivers’ bank, waiting for the sun to go down. With enough darkness, bats started dropping out of the boxes to begin their nightly feeding on insects near the river. It has been more than two years since the Dillsboro Dam, on the Tuckasegee River, was removed, and everything indicates the removal has been positive for the river as native fish and other aquatic animals are expanding into habitat previously cut off to them, and using areas previously unusable.  Learn more...

  • A small brown bat on the roof of a cave with a fuzzy white fungus on its nose.
    A tri-color bat in the Avery County with white-nose syndrome. Photo by Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC.

    White-nose syndrome spreads in Western North Carolina

    April 11, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian creature feature. White-nose syndrome, the disease responsible for killing millions of North American bats continues to spread in Western North Carolina. Earlier this spring the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission confirmed the disease in Haywood County, the fifth North Carolina county where the disease has been discovered. The Haywood confirmation comes from dead bats collected from an abandoned mine. The disease was previously discovered in a retired Avery County mine, a cave at Grandfather Mountain, a McDowell County cave, an abandoned mine in Yancey County, and near the Pisgah Center for Wildlife Education in Transylvania County.  Learn more...

  • A small brown bat on the roof of a cave with a fuzzy white fungus on its nose.
    A tri-color bat in the Avery County with white-nose syndrome. Photo by Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC.

    Grant to help fight white-nose syndrome

    April 4, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. As the bat disease white nose syndrome continues to spread in the Southern Appalachians, the U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service recently announced 1.4 million dollars to fund research into the disease and ways to control it. Funding for the grants was provided under the Endangered Species Act. White-nose syndrome has killed more than 5.5 million bats in eastern North America and has spread rapidly across the United States and into Canada since it was first detected in 2006.  Learn more...

  • Thousands of bats flying together at dusk.
    Information icon Bats flying. Photo by Ann Froschauer, USFWS.

    Bat blitz

    August 15, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The first bat was caught just as night set in, nearly immediately after biologists set the fine net designed to ensnare bats before they could sense its presence. Biologists immediately pulled the bat from the net and began the process of collecting data from it. Species, gender, and general age were determined. It was weighed. Wings were checked for damage – a sign of the deadly bat disease white-nose syndrome.  Learn more...

  • A small furry bat in a crevice of a cave with patches of white fungus on its face and shoulder.
    Information icon A northern-long-eared bat with suspected White Nose Syndrome. Photo by Steve Taylor, University of Illinois.

    Bats step closer to endangered species list

    August 1, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. White-nose syndrome is a deadly bat disease that has killed more than a million bats in the Eastern United States. Many have asked what this means for the long-term survival of entire species of bats, and we may be beginning to get an idea. The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service maintains the federal list of threatened and endangered species. Under the Endangered Species Act, anyone can ask the Service to add a plant or animal to that list, and based on the information they provide and information the Service already has, wildlife biologists may decide to investigate further, possibly deciding to add the species to the list.  Learn more...

  • Thousands of bats flying together at dusk.
    Information icon Bats flying. Photo by Ann Froschauer, USFWS.

    BatFest is upon us

    July 18, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. BatFest 2011 is nearly upon us. Sunday, July 31st from 2:00 to 5:30 at the North Carolina Forest Service’s training center in Crossnore, North Carolina you’ll have your chance to learn everything you wanted to know about bats. The public event kicks off the 2011 Bat Blitz, a three-day event with wildlife biologists from across the Eastern United States coming to Western North Carolina to collect data on the area’s bat populations.  Learn more...

  • Three furry bats hang from the wet ceiling of a cave.
    Information icon Trio of tri-colored bats covered in dew. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    BatFest

    July 4, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Bats are an incredibly important part of our world – helping control insect populations and pollinating plants. Despite all of this, bats still suffer from an image problem based on ill-conceived notions that they’re aggressive toward people and are rampant transmitters of rabies However, bat biologists are offering you a chance to have all your questions about bats answered during BatFest 2011, an educational event from 2 to 5:30 p.  Learn more...

  • A fuzzy bat bearing its teeth with white fungus covering its face.
    Information icon Little brown bat from Avery County with White Nose Syndrome. Photo by Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC.

    White-nose syndrome in Kentucky

    May 1, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature In addition to horses and bourbon, Kentucky is known for its caves, and indeed, is home to Mammoth Cave National Park, with the world’s longest known cave system. Hand in hand with the incredible number of caves is the fact that Kentucky is an incredibly important state for our nation’s bat populations. That’s why the recent news that the bat disease white-nose syndrome was discovered in the state is especially painful.  Learn more...

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