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Tag: Bat

The content below has been tagged with the term “Bat.”

Articles

  • Thousands of bats flying together at dusk.

    Winged assistants

    November 9, 2017 | 5 minute readNights, Jessica Smith likes to sit in a folding chair in her backyard and watch the evening show. It’s been playing with hardly a let-up since she installed a bat house on her barn two years ago. A different barn with maternity colony of little brown bats. Photo by Ann Froschauer, USFWS. Day shuts down, night opens up. Bats, hundreds of them, hurtle into the darkening sky to do what bats do best: eat insects. Learn more...

    Bats flying. Photo by Ann Froschauer, USFWS.

Podcasts

  • A small brown bat on the roof of a cave with a fuzzy white fungus on its nose.

    Bat monitoring protocol

    November 9, 2015 | 2 minute readTranscript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature Monitoring, or regularly going out and counting plants or animals following an established protocol, provides biologists with key information on the distribution of plants and animals and the well-being of individual populations. Though well-developed, nation-wide monitoring programs are in place for birds and other animals, until now there hasn’t been a similar program for North American bats. Earlier this year, the Forest Service published guidelines for participating in NABat, the first step in establishing a monitoring program for North American bats, and in doing so, provide natural resource managers the information they need to manage bat populations effectively, detect early warning signs of population declines, and estimate extinction risks. Learn more...

    A tri-color bat in the Avery County with white-nose syndrome. Photo by Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC.

  • A small brown bat on the roof of a cave with a fuzzy white fungus on its nose.

    Great Smoky Mountains National Park closure for bats

    September 28, 2015 | 2 minute readTranscript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature Great Smoky Mountains National Park officials announced the closure of the Whiteoak Sink area effective now through March 31, 2016 to limit human disturbance to bat hibernation sites and help hikers avoid interactions with bats. Park biologists have reported dramatic declines of cave-dwelling bat populations throughout the park, thought to be due to white-nose syndrome. Infected bats are marked by a white fungal growth on their noses, wings, and tail membrane. Learn more...

    A tri-color bat in the Avery County with white-nose syndrome. Photo by Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC.

  • Thousands of bats flying together at dusk.

    Bat blitz

    August 15, 2011 | 2 minute readTranscript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The first bat was caught just as night set in, nearly immediately after biologists set the fine net designed to ensnare bats before they could sense its presence. Biologists immediately pulled the bat from the net and began the process of collecting data from it. Species, gender, and general age were determined. It was weighed. Wings were checked for damage – a sign of the deadly bat disease white-nose syndrome. Learn more...

    Bats flying. Photo by Ann Froschauer, USFWS.

  • A small furry bat in a crevice of a cave with patches of white fungus on its face and shoulder.

    Bats step closer to endangered species list

    August 1, 2011 | 2 minute readTranscript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. White-nose syndrome is a deadly bat disease that has killed more than a million bats in the Eastern United States. Many have asked what this means for the long-term survival of entire species of bats, and we may be beginning to get an idea. The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service maintains the federal list of threatened and endangered species. Under the Endangered Species Act, anyone can ask the Service to add a plant or animal to that list, and based on the information they provide and information the Service already has, wildlife biologists may decide to investigate further, possibly deciding to add the species to the list. Learn more...

    A northern-long-eared bat with suspected White Nose Syndrome. Photo by Steve Taylor, University of Illinois.

  • Thousands of bats flying together at dusk.

    BatFest is upon us

    July 18, 2011 | 2 minute readTranscript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. BatFest 2011 is nearly upon us. Sunday, July 31st from 2:00 to 5:30 at the North Carolina Forest Service’s training center in Crossnore, North Carolina you’ll have your chance to learn everything you wanted to know about bats. The public event kicks off the 2011 Bat Blitz, a three-day event with wildlife biologists from across the Eastern United States coming to Western North Carolina to collect data on the area’s bat populations. Learn more...

    Bats flying. Photo by Ann Froschauer, USFWS.

  • Three furry bats hang from the wet ceiling of a cave.

    BatFest

    July 4, 2011 | 2 minute readTranscript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Bats are an incredibly important part of our world – helping control insect populations and pollinating plants. Despite all of this, bats still suffer from an image problem based on ill-conceived notions that they’re aggressive toward people and are rampant transmitters of rabies However, bat biologists are offering you a chance to have all your questions about bats answered during BatFest 2011, an educational event from 2 to 5:30 p. Learn more...

    Trio of tri-colored bats covered in dew. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

  • A fuzzy bat bearing its teeth with white fungus covering its face.

    White-nose syndrome in Kentucky

    May 1, 2011 | 2 minute readTranscript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature In addition to horses and bourbon, Kentucky is known for its caves, and indeed, is home to Mammoth Cave National Park, with the world’s longest known cave system. Hand in hand with the incredible number of caves is the fact that Kentucky is an incredibly important state for our nation’s bat populations. That’s why the recent news that the bat disease white-nose syndrome was discovered in the state is especially painful. Learn more...

    Little brown bat from Avery County with White Nose Syndrome. Photo by Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC.

  • A river runs through a valley in fall.

    New bats for endangered species list?

    April 18, 2011 | 2 minute readTranscript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The spread of white-nose syndrome, the deadly bat disease, brings with it many questions, one of the most important, what will become of our bat populations? Parts of the eastern United States have already seen dramatic die-offs in bat numbers. In response to white-nose syndrome, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, which maintains the U.S. list of endangered species, has been asked to add two more bat species to that list. Learn more...

    Eastern small-footed bat. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

  • A woman in chest waiters standing in a stream reaches out to touch a mist net

    Bat monitoring on the Davidson River

    August 11, 2010 | 2 minute readTranscript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. We sat in the darkness on the edge of the Davidson River in North Carolina’s Transylvania County. Every few minutes someone would turn on a bright headlamp and scan the net that was suspended across the river, searching for a bat that had gotten tangled in the net’s thin threads. It was part of an effort, led by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, to monitor the state’s bat populations and keep a lookout for signs of the deadly bat malady known as White Nose Syndrome. Learn more...

    Service biologist Sue Cameron helps set up a mist net. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

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