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Tag: At-Risk Species

The content below has been tagged with the term “At-Risk Species.”

Charleston

  • Several dozen cypress trees in an area that regularly floods
    Information icon Cypress trees at Cathedral Bay. Photo USFWS.

    Coastal program

    The South Carolina Coastal Program is a partnership driven program that conserves and protects natural habitat for federally listed species by providing technical and financial assistance for numerous public and private partners. The South Carolina Coastal Program is focused on the coastal plain of South Carolina and a portion of Georgia and works in a variety of habitats, including wetlands, uplands, estuaries, and beaches.  Learn more...

  • Dark, shiny oil covers a shoreline and the grasses growing on the beach.
    Information icon An oiled shoreline along the Savannah River. Photo by USFWS.

    Contaminants

    The role of the Environmental Contaminants Program in the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service is to protect wildlife and their habitat from the harmful effects of pollution. The Program’s main responsibilities include: Spill Incident planning and response, Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration (NRDAR), identification and assessment of potential environmental hazards, and technical support.  Learn more...

  • A small gopher tortoise with tan shell standing on sandy grass covered soil.
    Information icon Gopher tortoise. Photo by Randy Browning, USFWS.

    Habitat conservation

    Destruction, degradation, and fragmentation of habitat is the driving force behind today’s decline in species and biodiversity. Impacts to habitat can be caused directly by such activities as the clearing of forests to grow crops or build homes, or indirectly, such as by the introduction of invasive species or increased pollution run-off from yards and fields. The Service has tools available to help partners with conservation of listed, candidate, and at-risk species.  Learn more...

Series

  • Conserving paradise

    Take a trip with us down the Altamaha River. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service traveled the river from Jesup in Southeast Georgia to the barrier islands where the free-flowing Altamaha empties into the Atlantic Ocean.  Learn more...

Wildlife

  • A small catfish swimming above rocky substrate.
    Carolina madtom. Photo by D Biggins, former USFWS.

    Carolina madtom

    The Carolina madtom is a small catfish, reaching a maximum length of nearly five inches and can be found in riffles, runs, and pools in medium to large streams and rivers. Ideally, it inhabits fresh waters with continuous, year-round flow and moderate gradient in both the Piedmont and Coastal Plain physiographic regions.  Visit the species profile...

  • A hand holding a small snail hiding in its shell
    Information icon The magnificent ramshorn has a coiled shell in the shape of a rams horn, often reaching the size and weight of a dollar coin. The shell is brown colored (often with leopard-like spots) and fragile. Photo by USFWS.

    Magnificent ramshorn

    Taxon: Gastropod, freshwater snail Range: Lower Cape Fear River Basin, North Carolina Status: Candidate (2011) This snail is an integral part of a complex food web found in freshwater ponds exclusively along coastal North Carolina. This rare snail can no longer be found in the wild places it once inhabited, and is not to be confused with a common relative (the ramshorn snail) found abundantly in pet shops and aquariums.  Visit the species profile...

  • A spotted black salamander with red tufts around its gills.
    Information icon A young Neuse River waterdog from the Little River, Johnston County, North Carolina. Photo by Jeff Beane.

    Neuse River waterdog

    The Neuse River waterdog is from an ancient lineage of permanently aquatic salamanders in the genus Necturus.  Visit the species profile...

  • A biologist holding a yellow/brown fish on a river bank in front of a dam
    North Carolina Biologist with Sicklefin redhorse. Photo: Mark Cantrell, USFWS.

    Sicklefin redhorse

    The sicklefin redhorse, a freshwater fish, can grow to 25 inches long. It has a sickle-shaped back fin that is olive-colored, sometimes partly red. Its body is also olive, with a coppery or brassy sheen; its lower fins are primarily dusky to dark, often tinted yellow or orange and pale edged; the tail fin is mostly red.  Visit the species profile...

  • A black, grey and yellow snake with a rounded head.
    Information icon Southern hognose snake. Photo by Pierson Hill, FWC.

    Southern hognose snake

    Taxon: Reptile Range: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina Status: At-risk species, petitioned for listing on July 11, 2012; 90-day-finding that petitioned action may be warranted First described by Carl Linneaus in 1766 from a specimen received from Charleston, South Carolina, the southern hognose snake is the smallest of the five species of hognose snakes native to North America. All belonging to the genus Heterodon, there is the eastern hognose snake (H.  Visit the species profile...

  • A cluster of carnivorious plant heads with bright red/orange mouths.
    Information icon Venus flytrap. Photo by Jennifer Koches, USFWS.

    Venus flytrap

    The Venus flytrap, a small perennial herb, is one of the most widely recognized carnivorous plant species on Earth. It occupies distinct longleaf pine habitats in the Coastal Plain and Sandhills of North and South Carolina.  Visit the species profile...

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