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Tag: At Risk Species

The content below has been tagged with the term “At Risk Species.”

Series

  • Conserving paradise

    Take a trip with us down the Altamaha River. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service traveled the river from Jesup in Southeast Georgia to the barrier islands where the free-flowing Altamaha empties into the Atlantic Ocean. Learn more...

Wildlife

  • A spotted black salamander with red tufts around its gills.

    Neuse River waterdog

    The Neuse River waterdog is from an ancient lineage of permanently aquatic salamanders in the genus Necturus. Visit the species profile...

    A young Neuse River waterdog from the Little River, Johnston County, North Carolina, by Jeff Beane.

  • A biologist holding a yellow/brown fish on a river bank in front of a dam

    Sicklefin redhorse

    The sicklefin redhorse, a freshwater fish, can grow to 25 inches long. It has a sickle-shaped back fin that is olive-colored, sometimes partly red. Its body is also olive, with a coppery or brassy sheen; its lower fins are primarily dusky to dark, often tinted yellow or orange and pale edged; the tail fin is mostly red. Visit the species profile...

    North Carolina Biologist with Sicklefin redhorse. Photo: Mark Cantrell, USFWS.

  • A cluster of carnivorious plant heads with bright red/orange mouths.

    Venus flytrap

    The Venus flytrap, a small perennial herb, is one of the most widely recognized carnivorous plant species on Earth. It occupies distinct longleaf pine habitats in the Coastal Plain and Sandhills of North and South Carolina. Visit the species profile...

    Venus flytrap. Photo by Jennifer Koches, USFWS.

  • A group of about a dozen small triangular shellfish in shallow water.

    Yellow lance

    The Yellow lance is a freshwater mussel, an aquatic bivalve mollusk in the family Unionidae, the river mussels. Visit the species profile...

    Yellow lance in the Tar River in North Carolina. Photo by Sarah McRae, USFWS.

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