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Tag: At Risk Species

The content below has been tagged with the term “At Risk Species.”

Articles

Endangered-Species-Act

  • A brownish-yellow salamander sanding on a mossy rock with large round eyes.

    Additional information on petitioned turtles, salamanders, snakes, a skink and a crayfish found in the Southeast

    June 25, 2015 | 9 minute readAny plant or animal that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been petitioned to list and protect under the Endangered Species Act is considered “at-risk.” When we are petitioned to provide federal protection to a species, our biologists review the information presented by the petitioner as well as the information in our files prior to the date of the petition to determine whether a closer look at the species’ status is advisable. Learn more...

    The Pigeon Mountain salamander is no longer at-risk of needing federal protection. Photo by John P. Clare, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

  • A close up photo of a gray-silver salamander walking on a layer of wet moss.

    Additional information on six petitioned species including three salamanders, one lizard, and two insects found in the Southeast

    March 15, 2015 | 5 minute readAny plant or animal that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been petitioned to list and protect under the Endangered Species Act is considered “at-risk.” Recognizing that conservation is only successful through partnerships, the Service leveraged the work of state wildlife agencies and a variety of other conservation partners to assess whether these species at-risk require protection under the Act. Since receipt of the 2010 petitions, 60 southeastern species have not required federal protection as a result of either conservation actions, additional information (e. Learn more...

    Cheoah bald salamander. Photo by Andy Kraemer, CC BY-NC 2.0.

News

  • Illustration of an eel transitioning from dark green on it's top to a white belly with a long dorsal fin.

    Endangered Species Act protection not needed for 10 species in the Southeast

    October 7, 2015 | 5 minute readThe Cumberland arrow darter, Shawnee darter, Sequatchie caddisfly, American eel, and six Tennessee cave beetles do not need protection under the Endangered Species Act. Read the full story...

    American eel. Illustration by Duane Raver, USFWS.

  • A butterfly covered in white spots with orange and yellow wings perched on a purple flower.

    Service provides $5.7 million in grants to help conserve monarch butterflies and other at-risk species in 11 states

    June 2, 2015 | 4 minute readWashington, D.C. — The monarch butterfly, Topeka shiner and gopher tortoise are among the imperiled species that will benefit from $5.7 million in grants to 11 states through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Competitive State Wildlife Grants program. The grants focus on large-scale conservation projects to conserve and recover species of greatest conservation need and their habitats. They will be matched by more than $2.9 million in non-federal funds from states and their partners. Read the full story...

    A monarch butterfly on a purple plant with bright colors in the background. Photo by Christine Lisiewski.

  • Ten to twenty bright purple flowers emerge from thick vegetation.

    Service releases 2014 list of candidates for Endangered Species Act protection

    December 5, 2014 | 3 minute readThe U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has released the Candidate Notice of Review, a yearly status appraisal of plants and animals that are candidates for Endangered Species Act (ESA) protection. Twenty-two species from Hawaii and one from Independent Samoa and American Samoa were added to the candidate list, one species was removed, and one has changed in priority from the last review conducted in November 2013. There are now 146 species recognized by the Service as candidates for ESA protection. Read the full story...

    Georgia aster. Photo by Michele Elmore, The Nature Conservancy, Georgia.

  • Small white flowers with shiny green centers emerge from a stem.

    Service says listing Caribbean mayten not warranted

    July 3, 2012 | 2 minute readThe U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will not conduct an in-depth review of the status of the Caribbean mayten tree. The Service made this decision in response to a petition to list the tree as threatened or endangered with critical habitat under the Endangered Species Act. The petition was filed by WildEarth Guardians, in Denver, Colorado. In response to the petition filed October 6, 2011, the Service conducted a preliminary 90-day finding concluding the petition did not present substantial information indicating that listing the Caribbean mayten may be warranted. Read the full story...

    Caribbean mayten. Photo © Pedro Acevedo-Rodriquez, Smithsonian Institution, Department of Biology used with Permission.

Podcasts

  • A close up photo of a gray-silver salamander walking on a layer of wet moss.

    Hundreds of species examined for the endangered species list

    October 23, 2011 | 2 minute readTranscript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The Southeastern United States, including the Southern Appalachians, is a global center of aquatic biodiversity, which includes nearly 500 different fish, more than 300 snails, and nearly 300 mussels. Unfortunately many of those species are imperiled enough to be protected by the Endangered Species Act, and that number may go up in the coming months. The Endangered Species Act allows anyone to ask, or petition, the Fish & Wildlife Service to place a plant or animal on the federal endangered species list. Learn more...

    Cheoah bald salamander. Photo by Andy Kraemer, CC BY-NC 2.0.

  • Illustration of an eel transitioning from dark green on it's top to a white belly with a long dorsal fin.

    Is the American eel an endangered species?

    October 10, 2011 | 2 minute readTranscript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Salmon are perhaps the most famous migratory fish in the United States, but here in the east, from Greenland to South America, we have the American eel. Spending most of it’s time in rivers, all American eels migrate to the Sargasso Sea to reproduce, and then young eels return to rivers to become adults. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently announced that the American eel may need federal protection as a threatened or endangered species, following review of a request to protect the species under the Endangered Species Act. Learn more...

    American eel. Illustration by Duane Raver, USFWS.

  • A small furry bat in a crevice of a cave with patches of white fungus on its face and shoulder.

    Bats step closer to endangered species list

    August 1, 2011 | 2 minute readTranscript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. White-nose syndrome is a deadly bat disease that has killed more than a million bats in the Eastern United States. Many have asked what this means for the long-term survival of entire species of bats, and we may be beginning to get an idea. The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service maintains the federal list of threatened and endangered species. Under the Endangered Species Act, anyone can ask the Service to add a plant or animal to that list, and based on the information they provide and information the Service already has, wildlife biologists may decide to investigate further, possibly deciding to add the species to the list. Learn more...

    A northern-long-eared bat with suspected White Nose Syndrome. Photo by Steve Taylor, University of Illinois.

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