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Tag: At Risk Species

The content below has been tagged with the term “At Risk Species.”

Articles

  • Wiry pine trees sparsley dot a sandy landscape.

    A harmonious future for profits, pine and at-risk species along the Florida-Alabama line

    May 9, 2017 | 7 minute readPace, Florida — Longleaf pine forests once covered 90 million acres from Virginia to Texas, a bio-diverse swath of timber prized by shipbuilders and gopher tortoises alike. Sprawling cities, large farms and commercial pine plantations, though, replaced much of the longleaf habitat. Today, less than five million acres remain. Conservationists’ goal of eight million acres by 2025 seemed laughable. Until Resource Management Service and Jimmy Bullock came along. Map of the Coastal Headwaters Forest by the Conservation Fund and RMS. Learn more...

    A field of young longleaf pine at the Coastal Headwaters Forest. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

  • A biologist showing off a Louisiana pinsnake.

    Family adventure day in Louisiana

    May 3, 2017 | 1 minute readOn March 11, 2017, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Louisiana Ecological Services Office and the Baton Rouge Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office participated in the Healing House’s Family Adventure Day fundraiser and community outreach event in Lafayette, Louisiana. The Healing House provides support for children grieving the loss of a loved one. The Service’s station was one of 43 activity locations that families could visit throughout Lafayette. More than 250 participants selected the Service’s activity as one of their adventures. Learn more...

    Thomas Athens (Center), David Castellanos, and Sharna Tolfree introduce Luigi, the Louisiana pinesnake, to Family Adventure Day participants. Photo by Angela Trahan, USFWS.

  • A head-on photograph of two grey fighter jets flying in formation with a blue sky and clouds in the background.

    Biologists on bases: Fish and Wildlife joins the military

    April 26, 2017 | 6 minute readMelanie Kaeser is embedded with the military at Tyndall Air Force Base. She patrols the pine forests and swampy wetlands as F-16s and F-22s maneuver overhead. Her mission: protect those in harm’s way - the gopher tortoises, the St. Andrews Beach mice and the Godfrey’s butterworts. Learn more...

    Two F-22 Raptors from Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla., fly in formation. Photo by Senior Master Sgt. Thomas Meneguin, U.S. Air Force.

  • Mature trees form a canopy shading the river from the sun.

    Saving an endangered southern river

    March 22, 2017 | 6 minute readCrandall, Georgia – The Conasauga River courses through Jimmy Petty’s corn, bean and dairy farm near the Tennessee line. The Conasauga River flows through Jimmy Petty’s farm near Crandall, Ga. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS. Petty and his brothers own seven miles of riverfront, much of it covered one recent morning in bright green winter wheat, along both sides of the Conasauga. The mountains of the Chattahoochee National Forest offer a postcard-perfect backdrop. Learn more...

    Conasauga River shaded by trees. Photo by USFWS.

  • A red, semi-transluscent fish with catfish like whiskers in an aquarium.

    17 more fish, mussels, and other species don’t need the ESA’s protection

    February 8, 2017 | 3 minute readScientists recently proposed that 17 species including the Ouachita madtom, a whiskery fish found in Arkansas, be removed from a petition that had called for its protection under the Endangered Species Act. Learn more...

    Ouachita madtom. Photo by Conservation Fisheries.

  • Conserving imperiled aquatic species in the Upper Tennessee River Basin

    May 5, 2016 | 1 minute readA team of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service scientists, with assistance from U.S. Geological Survey, have developed a collaborative conservation strategy examining cost-effective approaches for efforts to conserve and manage 36 imperiled freshwater fish and mussel species in the 22,360 square-mile Upper Tennessee River Basin. The strategy identifies aquatic species conservation objectives and recommends a management approach for conserving and recovering prioritized species and locations across the basin. Learn more...

Endangered-Species-Act

  • A close up photo of a semi translucent gray-silver crayfish walking on rocky substrate.

    Endangered Species Act Protection Not Needed for Four Southeastern Animals

    September 20, 2016 | 5 minute readThe Endangered Species Act allows anyone to request, or petition, the Service to add a plant or animal to the federal endangered species list. The Service was petitioned to place all four of these animals on the list, and all but the crayfish have been considered candidates for the threatened and endangered species list. The Service is in the midst of a multi-year work plan to address these species, and evaluating these animals is part of the scheduled 2016 workload. Learn more...

    Angular dwarf crayfish. Photo by Chris Lukhaup, USDA Forest Service.

News

  • A light orange salamander with a bright orange stripe

    Fish and Wildlife, the military and state of Florida boost conservation at Camp Blanding

    April 6, 2017 | 3 minute readThe U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service joined Florida conservation and military officials Thursday in a voluntary effort to keep the striped newt, gopher tortoise and 20 other at-risk species from being federally listed as endangered. Read the full story...

    Juvenile striped newt. Photo by FWC.

  • A close up photo of a semi translucent gray-silver crayfish walking on rocky substrate.

    Endangered Species Act protection not needed for four Southeastern animals

    September 20, 2016 | 4 minute readResponding to requests to add them to the federal threatened and endangered species list, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has concluded that the angular dwarf crayfish, Icebox Cave beetle, Clifton Cave beetle, and the Virgin Island coqui do not need such protection. “To receive Endangered Species Act protection, the species must be facing threats that would likely cause extinction or threaten existence in the foreseeable future,” said Cindy Dohner, the Service’s Southeast Regional Director. Read the full story...

    Angular dwarf crayfish. Photo by Chris Lukhaup, USDA Forest Service.

  • A small mouse white white belly and sand-colored back hides behind beach vegetation.

    Fish and Wildlife Service conducting five-year status reviews of 22 Southeastern species

    August 30, 2016 | 5 minute readThe U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 15 endangered and seven threatened species occurring across the southeastern United States. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before October 31, 2016. These reviews will ensure listing classifications under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) reflect the latest available information and data. In addition to reviewing the classification of these species, a five-year review presents an opportunity to track the species’ recovery progress, and may benefit species by providing valuable information to guide future conservation efforts. Read the full story...

    Alabama beach mouse. Photo by USFWS.

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