skip to content

Tag: At Risk Species

The content below has been tagged with the term “At Risk Species.”

Articles

  • A gentleman with a grey mustache standing next to a mature longleaf pine tree.

    Growing trees, saving species

    August 9, 2017 | 8 minute readIf one of the Southeast’s signature species is the gopher tortoise, so, too, is the towering pine that shades its burrow. The longleaf pine is one of the Southeastern United States’ great trees. When European settlers came to North America, they discovered Pinus palustris. It stretched across 90 million acres, from east Texas to Virginia, and was just what a young nation needed to grow. The wood from the conifer built homes, sailing masts and even roads. Learn more...

    Longleaf pines, says Salem Saloom, are "part of our heritage." Photo by Mark Davis, USFWS.

  • Two finely manicured hands reach for a tiny gopher tortoise hiding in its shell on sandy soil.

    Florida couple dedicates property to conservation

    July 20, 2017 | 2 minute readBen and LouAnn Williams own approximately 3,400 acres of pinelands interspersed with bottomland hardwoods in Putnam County, Florida, between Jacksonville and Daytona Beach. Their property contributes to conservation on a regional scale because it is adjacent to publicly owned conservation areas, creating an important link in a chain of conservation lands from central Florida to the Georgia state line. Sandhill after prescribed burn. Photo by Ben Williams. In 2012, the Williams’ began establishing longleaf pine on their property and reintroduced prescribed burning. Learn more...

    A gopher tortoise hiding in its shell. Photo by Ben Williams.

  • Wolf Creek continues mussel culture

    July 19, 2017 | 1 minute readWolf Creek National Fish Hatchery staff decided to expand this year when it came to culturing freshwater mussels in suspended cages in Lake Cumberland in Russell County, Kentucky. Learn more...

  • A sandy beach with a tuft of vegetation following a jetty.

    A sanctuary for at-risk birds

    July 12, 2017 | 3 minute readWolf Island National Wildlife Refuge, Georgia – It rained heavily the night before, and the puffy white clouds on the horizon presaged more storms heading for the Georgia coast. At 7 am., with the tide receding, Tim Keyes hustled the Carolina Skiff into the Altamaha Sound where the same-name river meets the sea. Destination: the low-lying barrier islands off limits to the public, but teeming with at-risk, threatened and endangered birds. Learn more...

    Wolf Island. Photo by Nicole Vidal, USFWS.

  • The sun sets over a lush green marsh cut in half by a calm brackish channel.

    Many partners work together to protect “the Amazon of the South” for generations to come

    July 12, 2017 | 13 minute readIt meanders 137 miles through the wild heart of Georgia, a blackwater beauty that nourishes longleaf pine forests, cypress swamps, saltwater estuaries and the barrier islands that protect the Atlantic coast and migratory birds alike. Learn more...

    Salt marsh along the Altamaha River. Photo by Nicole Vidal, USFWS.

  • Wiry pine trees sparsley dot a sandy landscape.

    A harmonious future for profits, pine and at-risk species along the Florida-Alabama line

    May 9, 2017 | 7 minute readPace, Florida — Longleaf pine forests once covered 90 million acres from Virginia to Texas, a bio-diverse swath of timber prized by shipbuilders and gopher tortoises alike. Sprawling cities, large farms and commercial pine plantations, though, replaced much of the longleaf habitat. Today, less than five million acres remain. Conservationists’ goal of eight million acres by 2025 seemed laughable. Until Resource Management Service and Jimmy Bullock came along. Map of the Coastal Headwaters Forest by the Conservation Fund and RMS. Learn more...

    A field of young longleaf pine at the Coastal Headwaters Forest. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

  • A biologist showing off a Louisiana pinsnake.

    Family adventure day in Louisiana

    May 3, 2017 | 1 minute readOn March 11, 2017, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Louisiana Ecological Services Office and the Baton Rouge Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office participated in the Healing House’s Family Adventure Day fundraiser and community outreach event in Lafayette, Louisiana. The Healing House provides support for children grieving the loss of a loved one. The Service’s station was one of 43 activity locations that families could visit throughout Lafayette. More than 250 participants selected the Service’s activity as one of their adventures. Learn more...

    Thomas Athens (Center), David Castellanos, and Sharna Tolfree introduce Luigi, the Louisiana pinesnake, to Family Adventure Day participants. Photo by Angela Trahan, USFWS.

  • A head-on photograph of two grey fighter jets flying in formation with a blue sky and clouds in the background.

    Biologists on bases: Fish and Wildlife joins the military

    April 26, 2017 | 6 minute readMelanie Kaeser is embedded with the military at Tyndall Air Force Base. She patrols the pine forests and swampy wetlands as F-16s and F-22s maneuver overhead. Her mission: protect those in harm’s way - the gopher tortoises, the St. Andrews Beach mice and the Godfrey’s butterworts. Learn more...

    Two F-22 Raptors from Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla., fly in formation. Photo by Senior Master Sgt. Thomas Meneguin, U.S. Air Force.

News

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn