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Tag: At Risk Species

The content below has been tagged with the term “At Risk Species.”

Articles

  • A turtle with a dark shell and orang spots surrounded by fallen leaves
    Information icon The spotted turtle's shell makes it a prize in the pet trade. It is illegal to trap the reptile, whose range extends from Maine to Florida. Photo by Mark Davis, USFWS.

    Here, spot!

    April 20, 2018 | 8 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service considers spotted turtles at risk of being listed under the Endangered Species Act; they work with the Orianne Society, as well as other organizations, to learn more about the turtle.  Learn more...

  • A half dozen large silver fish jumping out of the water to a height of six feet.
    School of jumping silver carp. Photo by Ryan Hagerty, USFWS.

    A war in the water

    March 19, 2018 | 8 minute read

    Eastport, Mississippi — This stretch of the Tennessee River is considered the most aquatically biodiverse in the nation, teeming with sportfish and at-risk snails and mussels. Locals boast that Pickwick Lake, where Mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee come together, is “the smallmouth bass capital of the world.” Catfish and buffalo fill commercial angler’s nets. Marinas lining the reservoir’s roads attest to Pickwick’s huge economic impact. Yet the Tennessee River, and a way of life, is under siege.  Learn more...

  • A hand holding eight endangered Cumberland bean mussels.
    Information icon Cumberlandian combshell mussels. Photo by USFWS.

    2017 mussel harvest in Kentucky is a success

    January 30, 2018 | 1 minute read

    Expectations were high on Nov. 15, 2017, when personnel from the Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery and the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources Center for Mollusk Conservation anxiously harvested 15 cages that had been suspended in Lake Cumberland earlier in the spring. Each cage contained infested host fish and substrate suitable for juvenile mussels when transformation was complete. The hard work and the long wait were rewarded as the cages were lifted after almost six months in the lake and the counting began.  Learn more...

  • Purple/grey and bright orange flowers bloom in a grassy field.
    Information icon Two species of milkweed, common and butterfly, grow wild in the barrens. Milkweed is a favorite plant of monarch butterflies. Photo by J. Brent Harrel, USFWS.

    Partners join to conserve rare prairie barrens in Kentucky

    August 31, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Monarch butterflies descend on the fields in droves, drawn by the abundance of milkweed, their favorite pollinator plant. Endangered northern long-eared and Indiana bats swoop through the sky. On the ground, biodiversity abounds, with rare plants like scurf pea and false gromwell. This little Eden - 160 acres now owned by the non-profit Southern Conservation Corps (SCC) – is a combination of forest and extremely rare prairie barrens habitat in Garrard County, a mostly rural county in central Kentucky.  Learn more...

Faq

  • Beaverpond marstonia presumed extinct

    December 28, 2017 | 2 minute read

    The Service says the beaverpond marstonia is presumed to be extinct, but is not stating definitively it is extinct. What is the difference? As required by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the Service used the best available scientific and commercial information in evaluating the status of the beaverpond marstonia. As a result of multiple surveys conducted since the last time the species was documented in 2000, no individuals have been located.  Learn more...

News

  • Tiny South Georgia snail presumed extinct, will not receive federal protection

    December 28, 2017 | 1 minute read

    The beaverpond marstonia, a tiny snail the size of a pencil eraser, was discovered in 1977 in a creek in South Georgia. It’s been 17 years since it was last seen. Based on the best available information, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing today that the beaverpond marstonia is presumed to be extinct. As a result, the agency will not list the species as endangered or threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  Read the full story...

  • A cluster of carnivorious plant heads with bright red/orange mouths.
    Information icon Venus flytrap. Photo by Jennifer Koches, USFWS.

    Bat, snail, and popular plant may need endangered species protection

    December 19, 2017 | 5 minute read

    More research is needed on three species before U.S. Fish and Wildlife officials can determine whether to add them to the threatened and endangered species list. More scientific and commercial information will be compiled for the Venus flytrap, located in the Carolinas; oblong rocksnail, located in Alabama; and tricolored bat, located in 38 states, including Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. The Service and its partners will continue to research the species’ life history, biological requirements and habitats to develop a Species Status Assessment (SSA) and 12-month finding.  Read the full story...

  • A small fish with dark stripes on a yellow tinged back and white belly.
    Information icon Blackfin sucker. Photo by Matthew Thomas, KDFWR.

    Endangered Species Act protections not needed for Southeastern fish and crayfish

    December 5, 2017 | 2 minute read

    A crayfish found in sinkholes and freshwater spring caves in the Florida panhandle and a small fish found in clear headwater streams of the Upper Barren River System in Kentucky and Tennessee, do not warrant listing under the Endangered Species Act.  Read the full story...

  • A turtle basking on a log overhanging a pool of water.
    Information icon Adult female Barbour’s map turtle on the Chipola River. Photo by Jonathan Mays, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

    Endangered species listing not needed for three species of wildlife in the Southeast

    October 4, 2017 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has concluded the Barbour’s map turtle, the Florida Keys mole skink, and the Big Blue Springs cave crayfish do not face the threat of extinction now or in the foreseeable future and do not require Endangered Species Act (ESA) protections. Based on a rigorous review of the science, the Service has determined that all three species have healthy and stable populations, primary stressors do not threaten their survival in the wild, and adequate conservation measures are in place for each.  Read the full story...

  • A greyish green fish with a long body and blueish grey fins.
    Information icon Bridled darter. Photo by Noel Burkhead, United States Geological Survey.

    Endangered Species Act protection not needed for two Coosa darters

    October 3, 2017 | 2 minute read

    After a scientifically rigorous process, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) has concluded instead that the holiday darter and bridled darter populations are stable, being conserved through existing regulations, and do not need protection. The holiday darter is a small freshwater fish found in small creeks to moderate-sized rivers above the fall line in the Ridge and Valley, Blue Ridge, and Piedmont provinces of Alabama, Georgia and Tennessee. The Service reviewed seven populations for the holiday darter, and all seven populations still exist within the current range.  Read the full story...

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