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Tag: At Risk Species

The content below has been tagged with the term “At Risk Species.”

Articles

  • Purple/grey and bright orange flowers bloom in a grassy field.

    Partners join to conserve rare prairie barrens in Kentucky

    August 31, 2017 | 3 minute readMonarch butterflies descend on the fields in droves, drawn by the abundance of milkweed, their favorite pollinator plant. Endangered northern long-eared and Indiana bats swoop through the sky. On the ground, biodiversity abounds, with rare plants like scurf pea and false gromwell. This little Eden - 160 acres now owned by the non-profit Southern Conservation Corps (SCC) – is a combination of forest and extremely rare prairie barrens habitat in Garrard County, a mostly rural county in central Kentucky. Learn more...

    Two species of milkweed, common and butterfly, grow wild in the barrens. Milkweed is a favorite plant of monarch butterflies. Photo by J. Brent Harrel, USFWS.

  • Deep tire tracks scar a dirt road that cuts through a forest.

    The dirt road connection

    August 29, 2017 | 3 minute readJudge Stacey Avey has been serving on the bench for 17 years in Arkansas’ Stone County, a rural county in the Ozarks a little south of the Arkansas-Missouri state line. There are 13,000 people there, and a lot of unpaved dirt and gravel roads. Thanks to a new multi-partner project called the Arkansas Unpaved Roads Program, some of those roads are now in much better shape, which benefits both the residents and the wildlife, including some endangered and at-risk species, that live there. Learn more...

    An unpaved road. Photo by Chris Gorski, CC BY-ND 2.0.

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.

    A unique mountain refuge protects endangered wetlands and the wildlife within

    August 24, 2017 | 8 minute readEast Flat Rock, North Carolina – It’s not much to look at really. Nothing about this all-too-familiar stretch of Southern blacktop indicates that a rare, beautiful and endangered flower thrives just beyond the railroad tracks. There’s a convenience store, a small engine repair shop, a few modest homes. General Electric makes lights at a factory up the road. Bat Fork Creek meanders nearby. Below the tracks, though, in an Appalachian mountain bog, bunched arrowheads rise from soggy ground. Learn more...

    Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

  • A military officer in uniform releases a gopher tortoise next to a burrow.

    Boosting the gopher tortoise

    August 22, 2017 | 8 minute readAtlanta, Georgia – Typically, animals like the Florida panther lose their Southern habitat, dwindle perilously close to extinction and end up on the endangered species list. Federal, state and non-profit groups hustle to raise money and conserve land to bolster the populations with the chance, one day, of delisting it. The gopher tortoise, though, just might buck the trend. An at-risk species in Georgia, Florida and parts of Alabama and South Carolina, the tank-like tortoise is the recipient of an unprecedented, high-dollar collaboration between government agencies, NGOs and the private sector to keep gopherus polyphemus from ever gracing the threatened or endangered species list. Learn more...

    Col. Matthew Higer, 96th Test Wing vice commander, bends down to release a gopher tortoise into its new home deep within the Eglin Air Force Base. Photo by Samuel King Jr., U.S. Air Force.

Faq

  • Beaverpond marstonia presumed extinct

    December 28, 2017 | 2 minute readThe Service says the beaverpond marstonia is presumed to be extinct, but is not stating definitively it is extinct. What is the difference? As required by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the Service used the best available scientific and commercial information in evaluating the status of the beaverpond marstonia. As a result of multiple surveys conducted since the last time the species was documented in 2000, no individuals have been located. Learn more...

News

  • Tiny South Georgia snail presumed extinct, will not receive federal protection

    December 28, 2017 | 1 minute readThe beaverpond marstonia, a tiny snail the size of a pencil eraser, was discovered in 1977 in a creek in South Georgia. It’s been 17 years since it was last seen. Based on the best available information, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing today that the beaverpond marstonia is presumed to be extinct. As a result, the agency will not list the species as endangered or threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Read the full story...

  • A cluster of carnivorious plant heads with bright red/orange mouths.

    Bat, snail, and popular plant may need endangered species protection

    December 19, 2017 | 5 minute readMore research is needed on three species before U.S. Fish and Wildlife officials can determine whether to add them to the threatened and endangered species list. More scientific and commercial information will be compiled for the Venus flytrap, located in the Carolinas; oblong rocksnail, located in Alabama; and tricolored bat, located in 38 states, including Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. The Service and its partners will continue to research the species’ life history, biological requirements and habitats to develop a Species Status Assessment (SSA) and 12-month finding. Read the full story...

    Venus flytrap. Photo by Jennifer Koches, USFWS.

  • A small fish with dark stripes on a yellow tinged back and white belly.

    Endangered Species Act protections not needed for Southeastern fish and crayfish

    December 5, 2017 | 2 minute readA crayfish found in sinkholes and freshwater spring caves in the Florida panhandle and a small fish found in clear headwater streams of the Upper Barren River System in Kentucky and Tennessee, do not warrant listing under the Endangered Species Act. Read the full story...

    Blackfin sucker. Photo by Matthew Thomas, KDFWR.

  • A turtle basking on a log overhanging a pool of water.

    Endangered species listing not needed for three species of wildlife in the Southeast

    October 4, 2017 | 3 minute readThe U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has concluded the Barbour’s map turtle, the Florida Keys mole skink, and the Big Blue Springs cave crayfish do not face the threat of extinction now or in the foreseeable future and do not require Endangered Species Act (ESA) protections. Based on a rigorous review of the science, the Service has determined that all three species have healthy and stable populations, primary stressors do not threaten their survival in the wild, and adequate conservation measures are in place for each. Read the full story...

    Adult female Barbour’s map turtle on the Chipola River. Photo by Jonathan Mays, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

  • A greyish green fish with a long body and blueish grey fins.

    Endangered Species Act protection not needed for two Coosa darters

    October 3, 2017 | 2 minute readAfter a scientifically rigorous process, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) has concluded instead that the holiday darter and bridled darter populations are stable, being conserved through existing regulations, and do not need protection. The holiday darter is a small freshwater fish found in small creeks to moderate-sized rivers above the fall line in the Ridge and Valley, Blue Ridge, and Piedmont provinces of Alabama, Georgia and Tennessee. The Service reviewed seven populations for the holiday darter, and all seven populations still exist within the current range. Read the full story...

    Bridled darter. Photo by Noel Burkhead, United States Geological Survey.

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