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Tag: At Risk Species

The content below has been tagged with the term “At Risk Species.”

Articles

  • A pine forest with trees snapped in half by high winds and a bent speed limit sign
    Information icon Tyndall Air Force Base pine forests were scissored by Hurricane Michael. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    After Hurricane Michael

    November 29, 2018 | 6 minute read

    Camilla, Georgia — Hurricane Michael barreled across prime Southern timber territory, damaging five million acres of pines and hardwoods and destroying nearly $1.7 billion worth of marketable trees. Habitat for many of the region’s at-risk species — red-cockaded woodpeckers, gopher tortoises, eastern indigo snakes — was sundered. Red-cockaded woodpecker in flight. Photo by Martjan Lammertink, U.S. Forest Service. Now, six weeks after Michael killed more than 45 people in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and Virginia, forest owners salvage timber, clear stands and pray for a market rebound.  Learn more...

  • A brown sign bent in half by high winds that reads St Vincent NWR
    Information icon The sand-clogged dock with St. Vincent NWR in the background. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Survivors of the storm

    October 22, 2018 | 6 minute read

    Bradley Smith seeks evidence that the red wolves survived Hurricane Michael off St. Vincent NWR. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS. Apalachicola, Florida — Bradley Smith stood tall on the bow of the SeaArk 21-footer with a VHF antenna held high. It was quiet, too quiet. It had been six days since Hurricane Michael devastated the Panhandle and Smith was listening for signs of life on St.  Learn more...

  • A drum-shapped buoy washed ashore with plam trees and a lighthouse in the distance
    Information icon A buoy washed ashore by Hurricane Michael at St. Marks NWR.

    Service makes headway in Hurricane Michael repairs

    October 17, 2018 | 5 minute read

    St. Marks, Florida — The images of Hurricane Michael’s rampage across the Panhandle have been seared, by now, into the nation’s collective consciousness: the roofless homes; the mountains of debris; the long lines of anguished people; and the miles of chopped-in-half trees. The worst of the damage came courtesy of winds nearing 155 mph. Michael’s counter-clockwise punch, though, pushed water from the Gulf of Mexico deep inland, swamping small towns, barrier islands and wildlife refuges, particularly along Michael’s eastern edge.  Learn more...

  • A man with a beard looks closely at an insect with a magnifying glass
    Information icon Zoologist David Withers of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation examines a Sequatchie caddisfly, an insect that lives in only a very few spots in Tennessee. Photo by Phil Kloer, USFWS.

    Protecting the rare

    September 18, 2018 | 5 minute read

    Sequatchie Cave State Natural Area, Tennessee — A royal snail is about the size of a match head. You could be standing in a few inches of water with lots of royal snails at your feet, look down, and not even see them. The royal snail, found only in one county in Tennessee, was declared in endangered in 1994. Photo by David Withers, Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation.  Learn more...

  • A prescribed fire burns vegetation just outside of a housing development.
    Information icon Prime example of wildland urban interface on Sanibel Island, J.N. “Ding” Darling NWR. Photo by USFWS.

    Safe and sound burning

    September 10, 2018 | 9 minute read

    Hobe Sound, Florida — The well-to-do on Jupiter Island wanted the wildlife refuge burned and who was to say no? Not the federal biologists at the refuge across the Intracoastal Waterway. They were eager to accommodate their neighbors and restore the pine scrub habitat. But the stakes — and potential dangers — were high. A prescribed fire, by its nature, is carefully planned and executed to minimize mishaps. Yet, winds shift.  Learn more...

  • A hillside with debris and trees snapped in half like twigs.
    Information icon A portion of Jose Roig’s coffee plantation immediately after Hurricane Maria struck. Photo by USFWS.

    Aid in the shade

    August 9, 2018 | 4 minute read

    In September 2017, Puerto Rico was already reeling from Hurricane Irma, which had doused it with torrential rains and caused widespread damage. Then, two weeks later, Hurricane Maria roared through, killing hundreds of residents, wiping out buildings, entire landscapes of vegetation, and practically the entire electrical grid. It was the worst natural disaster on record for the U.S. commonwealth island, which is still recovering from the Category 4 storm.  Learn more...

  • A small garden with a few small shrubs and plants surrounded by concrete pavers.
    Information icon The butterfly garden at Warm Springs NFH. Photo by Alexander Londono, USFWS.

    Warm Springs butterfly garden gets expansion

    July 17, 2018 | 1 minute read

    Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery in Georgia continues to add to its butterfly garden with the expertise of hatchery manager Carlos Echevarria, who has brought the love of his lifelong hobby to the hatchery garden. With the addition of 83 new plants and 14 different species to the current 32 butterfly milkweeds, the garden will support all types of pollinators and will be a magnificent sight for all to enjoy. This ongoing pollinator restoration program will further help to recover endangered and threatened pollinators such as the the monarch butterfly.  Learn more...

  • A shining example

    June 4, 2018 | 7 minute read

    Atlanta, Georgia — Sam Shine, for years, quietly bought up North Florida property and set about conserving it. A successful Midwestern manufacturer, Shine made a number of under-the-radar land deals that received little notice outside the Panhandle conservation community. Until now. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service just received 6,200 acres of ecologically critical pine lands and headwaters adjoining the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Shine is donating the land to the Service — a gift — not merely selling of a chunk at a good price or establishing a conservation easement.  Learn more...

News

  • New regional director to head southeastern conservation efforts Fish and Wildlife Service

    December 10, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Service officials announced late last month that Leopoldo “Leo” Miranda will head the Service’s Southeast Region. The tract encompasses 10 southeastern states as well as Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.  Read the full story...

  • Red-cockaded woodpecker flying from its nest.
    Red-cockaded woodpecker. Photo by Martjan Lammertink, U.S. Forest Service.

    Base recognized for conservation work

    May 30, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Camp Blanding, flush with federally endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers, donates juvenile birds to other wildlife areas across the South. Nearly two-thirds of the National Guard base in Northeast Florida is prime habitat for at-risk gopher tortoises too. More than 10,000 acres of pine and scrub is carefully burned each year to benefit under-threat flora and fauna as well as conservation-friendly longleaf pines. And the joint military base is a critical piece in the creation of a wildlife corridor that connects central Florida to southeast Georgia.  Read the full story...

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