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Tag: At-Risk Species

The content below has been tagged with the term “At-Risk Species.”

Articles

  • A dozen or so small grey fish next to a ruler.
    Information icon Adult saltmarsh topminnows. Photo by Ronald Paille, USFWS.

    Looking for the saltmarsh topminnow in coastal Louisiana

    March 12, 2019 | 3 minute read

    The Fish and Wildlife Service has been petitioned by WildEarth Guardians to list the saltmarsh topminnow under the Endangered Species Act. Not much is known about the topminnow’s distribution and biology so the Service is researching this species. According to scientific literature, the topminnow occurs in marshes along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast. It is a small non-migratory estuarine fish which reaches up to three inches long. It forages on the marsh surface during high tides, and retreats to small tidal creeks and rivulets during low tide.  Learn more...

  • A butterfly covered in white spots with orange and yellow wings perched on a purple flower.
    Information icon A monarch butterfly on a purple plant with bright colors in the background. Photo by Christine Lisiewski.

    Teeing up conservation

    January 29, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Most people view golf courses as swaths of perfectly cropped and contoured grass, closer to artifice than raw nature. As many golfers can attest, however, most of the golf course outside the boundaries of greens and fairways is wild and unruly, and can be a difficult place to locate an errant ball. “About 70 percent of most golf course acreage is managed for out-of-play areas,” said Dr. Kimberly Erusha, managing director of the U.  Learn more...

  • A pine forest with trees snapped in half by high winds and a bent speed limit sign
    Information icon Tyndall Air Force Base pine forests were scissored by Hurricane Michael. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    After Hurricane Michael

    November 29, 2018 | 6 minute read

    Camilla, Georgia — Hurricane Michael barreled across prime Southern timber territory, damaging five million acres of pines and hardwoods and destroying nearly $1.7 billion worth of marketable trees. Habitat for many of the region’s at-risk species — red-cockaded woodpeckers, gopher tortoises, eastern indigo snakes — was sundered. Red-cockaded woodpecker in flight. Photo by Martjan Lammertink, U.S. Forest Service. Now, six weeks after Michael killed more than 45 people in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and Virginia, forest owners salvage timber, clear stands and pray for a market rebound.  Learn more...

  • A brown sign bent in half by high winds that reads St Vincent NWR
    Information icon The sand-clogged dock with St. Vincent NWR in the background. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Survivors of the storm

    October 22, 2018 | 6 minute read

    Bradley Smith seeks evidence that the red wolves survived Hurricane Michael off St. Vincent NWR. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS. Apalachicola, Florida — Bradley Smith stood tall on the bow of the SeaArk 21-footer with a VHF antenna held high. It was quiet, too quiet. It had been six days since Hurricane Michael devastated the Panhandle and Smith was listening for signs of life on St.  Learn more...

  • A drum-shapped buoy washed ashore with plam trees and a lighthouse in the distance
    Information icon A buoy washed ashore by Hurricane Michael at St. Marks NWR.

    Service makes headway in Hurricane Michael repairs

    October 17, 2018 | 5 minute read

    St. Marks, Florida — The images of Hurricane Michael’s rampage across the Panhandle have been seared, by now, into the nation’s collective consciousness: the roofless homes; the mountains of debris; the long lines of anguished people; and the miles of chopped-in-half trees. The worst of the damage came courtesy of winds nearing 155 mph. Michael’s counter-clockwise punch, though, pushed water from the Gulf of Mexico deep inland, swamping small towns, barrier islands and wildlife refuges, particularly along Michael’s eastern edge.  Learn more...

  • A man with a beard looks closely at an insect with a magnifying glass
    Information icon Zoologist David Withers of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation examines a Sequatchie caddisfly, an insect that lives in only a very few spots in Tennessee. Photo by Phil Kloer, USFWS.

    Protecting the rare

    September 18, 2018 | 5 minute read

    Sequatchie Cave State Natural Area, Tennessee — A royal snail is about the size of a match head. You could be standing in a few inches of water with lots of royal snails at your feet, look down, and not even see them. The royal snail, found only in one county in Tennessee, was declared in endangered in 1994. Photo by David Withers, Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation.  Learn more...

News

  • A close-up shot of a small fish with a black line along it’s side and a bright red tip on it’s dorsal fin.
    Information icon Ashy darter. Photo by Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Thanks to conservation partnerships, two southeastern fish and a snail do not warrant Endangered Species Act protection

    April 3, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Following extensive scientific reviews, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that three southeastern animals do not face the threat of extinction now or in the foreseeable future. Accordingly, the ashy darter, Barrens darter and Arkansas mudalia snail do not warrant Endangered Species Act (ESA) protection. For each animal, the Service brought together a team of biologists who compiled and examined all known data and research. Their peer-reviewed findings are outlined in species status assessments (SSAs), made available today.  Read the full story...

  • A light orange salamander with a bright orange stripe
    Information icon Juvenile striped newt. Photo by FWC.

    Conservation partnerships help keep two birds, salamander and skink from requiring endangered species act protections

    December 18, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Following rigorous scientific reviews, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that, thanks in part to ongoing conservation partnerships, four southeastern animals do not face the threat of extinction now or in the foreseeable future. Accordingly, the MacGillivray’s seaside sparrow, Florida sandhill crane, striped newt and Cedar Key mole skink do not warrant Endangered Species Act (ESA) protection. “Our efforts working closely with diverse partners to proactively understand and address threats to wildlife is succeeding,” said Leo Miranda, the Service’s Southeast regional director.  Read the full story...

  • A small, blue and yellow fish floating above rocky substrate
    Information icon Tippecanoe darter. Photo © Robert Criswell, used with permission.

    Tiny freshwater fish does not warrant federal protection

    December 18, 2018 | 3 minute read

    After a thorough scientific review, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that populations of the Tippecanoe darter, a small freshwater fish, do not warrant federal protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). In some places, surveys suggest increasing populations, likely due to improvements in water quality. One of the smallest darters in the world, the Tippecanoe darter continues to be found across its historical range in larger streams and rivers of the Ohio River watershed in Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and West Virginia.  Read the full story...

  • New regional director to head southeastern conservation efforts Fish and Wildlife Service

    December 10, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Service officials announced late last month that Leopoldo “Leo” Miranda will head the Service’s Southeast Region. The tract encompasses 10 southeastern states as well as Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.  Read the full story...

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