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Tag: At Risk Species

The content below has been tagged with the term “At Risk Species.”

Articles

A shining example

June 4, 2018 | 7 minute readAtlanta, Georgia — Sam Shine, for years, quietly bought up North Florida property and set about conserving it. A successful Midwestern manufacturer, Shine made a number of under-the-radar land deals that received little notice outside the Panhandle conservation community. Until now. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service just received 6,200 acres of ecologically critical pine lands and headwaters adjoining the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Shine is donating the land to the Service — a gift — not merely selling of a chunk at a good price or establishing a conservation easement. Learn more...

A turtle with a dark shell and orang spots surrounded by fallen leaves

Here, spot!

April 20, 2018 | 8 minute readThe U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service considers spotted turtles at risk of being listed under the Endangered Species Act; they work with the Orianne Society, as well as other organizations, to learn more about the turtle. Learn more...

The spotted turtle's shell makes it a prize in the pet trade. It is illegal to trap the reptile, whose range extends from Maine to Florida. Photo by Mark Davis, USFWS.

A half dozen large silver fish jumping out of the water to a height of six feet.

A war in the water

March 19, 2018 | 8 minute readEastport, Mississippi — This stretch of the Tennessee River is considered the most aquatically biodiverse in the nation, teeming with sportfish and at-risk snails and mussels. Locals boast that Pickwick Lake, where Mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee come together, is “the smallmouth bass capital of the world.” Catfish and buffalo fill commercial angler’s nets. Marinas lining the reservoir’s roads attest to Pickwick’s huge economic impact. Yet the Tennessee River, and a way of life, is under siege. Learn more...

School of jumping silver carp. Photo by Ryan Hagerty, USFWS.

A hand holding eight endangered Cumberland bean mussels.

2017 mussel harvest in Kentucky is a success

January 30, 2018 | 1 minute readExpectations were high on Nov. 15, 2017, when personnel from the Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery and the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources Center for Mollusk Conservation anxiously harvested 15 cages that had been suspended in Lake Cumberland earlier in the spring. Each cage contained infested host fish and substrate suitable for juvenile mussels when transformation was complete. The hard work and the long wait were rewarded as the cages were lifted after almost six months in the lake and the counting began. Learn more...

Cumberlandian combshell mussels. Photo by USFWS.

Endangered-Species-Act

A brownish-yellow salamander sanding on a mossy rock with large round eyes.

At-Risk Species Conservation

The Endangered Species Act provides a variety of ways for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and our partners to conserve and recover species while reducing regulatory burden. Learn more...

The Pigeon Mountain salamander is no longer at-risk of needing federal protection. Photo by John P. Clare, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

Bilogists place mussels in a stream bed while a third person records information in a notebook.

Species Status Assessments (SSA)

The Species Status Assessment framework is an analytical approach developed by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service to deliver foundational science for informing all Endangered Species Act (ESA) decisions. An SSA is a focused, repeatable, and rigorous scientific assessment. The result will be better assessments, improved and more transparent and defensible decision making, and clearer and more concise documents. The Service is already seeing benefits from this approach. Ideally, the SSA is conducted at or prior to the candidate assessment or 12-month finding stage, but can be initiated at any time. Learn more...

Releasing golden riffleshells mussels and recording their location. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

A small gopher tortoise with tan shell standing on sandy grass covered soil.

Voluntary Conservation Tools

If you or someone you know would like to manage property to conserve wildlife and natural resources we’re here to help! Learn more...

Gopher tortoise. Photo by Randy Browning, USFWS.

News

Red-cockaded woodpecker flying from its nest.

Base recognized for conservation work

May 30, 2018 | 4 minute readCamp Blanding, flush with federally endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers, donates juvenile birds to other wildlife areas across the South. Nearly two-thirds of the National Guard base in Northeast Florida is prime habitat for at-risk gopher tortoises too. More than 10,000 acres of pine and scrub is carefully burned each year to benefit under-threat flora and fauna as well as conservation-friendly longleaf pines. And the joint military base is a critical piece in the creation of a wildlife corridor that connects central Florida to southeast Georgia. Read the full story...

Red-cockaded woodpecker. Photo by Martjan Lammertink, U.S. Forest Service.

Tiny South Georgia snail presumed extinct, will not receive federal protection

December 28, 2017 | 1 minute readThe beaverpond marstonia, a tiny snail the size of a pencil eraser, was discovered in 1977 in a creek in South Georgia. It’s been 17 years since it was last seen. Based on the best available information, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing today that the beaverpond marstonia is presumed to be extinct. As a result, the agency will not list the species as endangered or threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Read the full story...

A cluster of carnivorious plant heads with bright red/orange mouths.

Bat, snail, and popular plant may need endangered species protection

December 19, 2017 | 5 minute readMore research is needed on three species before U.S. Fish and Wildlife officials can determine whether to add them to the threatened and endangered species list. More scientific and commercial information will be compiled for the Venus flytrap, located in the Carolinas; oblong rocksnail, located in Alabama; and tricolored bat, located in 38 states, including Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. The Service and its partners will continue to research the species’ life history, biological requirements and habitats to develop a Species Status Assessment (SSA) and 12-month finding. Read the full story...

Venus flytrap. Photo by Jennifer Koches, USFWS.

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