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Tag: At Risk Species

The content below has been tagged with the term “At Risk Species.”

Articles

  • An aerial photograph of a river cutting through a marsh emptying into a the Gulf of Mexico.
    Information icon A View South over Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, Grand Bay, MS. Photo by USFWS.

    Gulf of Mexico Restoration Benefits Wetlands and Recreation

    June 24, 2020 | 5 minute read

    As we transition from American Wetlands Month through National Great Outdoors Month, it is the perfect time to showcase the restoration progress we continue to make in the Gulf of Mexico region. The Deepwater Horizon explosion occurred 10 years ago this spring and we’ve read many stories about the explosion and the sad impact the spill has had on wildlife and habitat. Oil fouled more than 1,300 miles of shoreline from Texas to Florida.  Learn more...

  • Partners improve habitat for rare Buck darter in Kentucky

    June 17, 2020 | 2 minute read

    The Buck darter is a little fish that can be found only in parts of the cold water springs of the Buck Creek watershed in south-central Kentucky. Surveys by the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources and Eastern Kentucky University have shown that there has been a massive decline in the species over the years. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is investigating if the Buck darter needs federal protection.  Learn more...

  • An aerial photograph of a meandering river cutting through a marsh
    Information icon Overhead view of Cabin Bluff and Ceylon properties. Photo © Mac Stone.

    History, both natural and human, lives in Georgia coastal preserve

    June 9, 2020 | 7 minute read

    Woodbine, Georgia — The state’s newest Wildlife Management Area sits a half mile off Interstate 95, yet a world removed from the hurly-burly of modern life. Pass the entrance on Ceylon Road, which runs through some of the Southeast’s most beautiful and pristine coastal lands, and step back in time. Stately stands of longleaf pine and live oak, some two centuries old, tower over savannah-like prairies and freshwater wetlands. More than 4,000 burrows, home to at-risk gopher tortoises, dot the landscape.  Learn more...

  • A low-growing shrub with leaves like sand dollars
    Information icon A rare hairy rattleweed plant. Photo by Daniel Chapman, USFWS.

    Learning to love a hairy rattleweed

    February 18, 2020 | 6 minute read

    Brunswick, Georgia — It sounds like the name of a punk rocker, or an illicit drug. It lurks under power lines, along roadsides and between rows of commercial pine trees. It’s covered in tiny, cobwebby hairs. It’s got a shape only a botanist could love. Pity the little-known, inelegantly named hairy rattleweed, or Baptisia arachnifera. It is one of the nation’s rarest plants, found in only two southeast Georgia counties and federally listed as an endangered species.  Learn more...

  • Boy scouts walk in a line through a young stand of pine trees.
    Information icon The Cape Fear Council of the Boy Scouts of America has been helping restore longleaf pine at a camp in North Carolina. Photo by Jacob Jay.

    Planting for the future

    January 8, 2020 | 5 minute read

    Reveille sounds. Long lines of uniformed Boy Scouts circle the flagpole. Pledges and singing follow. Out beyond this morning ritual, stately young longleaf pine trees proudly peek over swaying grasses. The Cape Fear Council of the Boy Scouts of America is restoring the longleaf pine ecosystem and awakening its rich history at Camp Bowers in eastern North Carolina. They are contributing to the goal of the America’s Longleaf Initiative to bring back an ecosystem that once spanned from Virginia to Texas, and in North Carolina supports unique wildlife such as the Venus flytrap, which is considered at risk in the wild.  Learn more...

  • Two biologists in wet suits and snorkle gear in a turbid stream looking for mussels
    Information icon Jay Mays and Brittany Barker-Jones discussing the mussel search on the French Broad River. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Mussel returns to French Broad River after 100-year absence

    August 20, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina — As a trio of kids on inner tubes quietly floated down the French Broad River outside Rosman, North Carolina, a nearby snorkeler broke the river’s surface, disturbing the quiet with a quick clearing of water from his snorkel. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist Jason Mays was searching the river bottom for 300 wavy-rayed lampmussels, freshwater mussels stocked by the Service and the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission (NCWRC) in early June.  Learn more...

  • Reclaiming a dump

    June 27, 2019 | 3 minute read

    Since Fiscal Year 2018, the West Georgia Field Office of the Partners for Fish and Wildlife (PFW) Program has participated in a regional cooperative agreement in partnership with American Forestry Foundation (AFF) to provide cost share for work on private lands in southern Alabama and west-central Georgia. The goal of this partnership is to improve habitat and provide technical assistance for at-risk species on private lands; this work can help track conservation actions, inform listing determinations and provide regulatory predictability to landowners.  Learn more...

Endangered-Species-Act

  • A brownish-yellow salamander sanding on a mossy rock with large round eyes.
    The Pigeon Mountain salamander is no longer at-risk of needing federal protection. Photo by John P. Clare, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    At-risk species conservation

    The Endangered Species Act provides a variety of ways for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and our partners to conserve and recover species while reducing regulatory burden.  Learn more...

  • A small gopher tortoise with tan shell standing on sandy grass covered soil.
    Information icon Gopher tortoise. Photo by Randy Browning, USFWS.

    Voluntary Conservation Tools

    If you or someone you know would like to manage property to conserve wildlife and natural resources we’re here to help!  Learn more...

  • Bilogists place mussels in a stream bed while a third person records information in a notebook.
    Releasing golden riffleshells mussels and recording their location. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Species Status Assessments (SSA)

    The Species Status Assessment framework is an analytical approach developed by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service to deliver foundational science for informing all Endangered Species Act (ESA) decisions. An SSA is a focused, repeatable, and rigorous scientific assessment. The result will be better assessments, improved and more transparent and defensible decision making, and clearer and more concise documents. The Service is already seeing benefits from this approach. Ideally, the SSA is conducted at or prior to the candidate assessment or 12-month finding stage, but can be initiated at any time.  Learn more...

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