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Tag: Asheville Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Asheville Ecological Services Field Office.”

News

  • Ten to twenty bright purple flowers emerge from thick vegetation.
    Information icon Georgia aster. Photo by Michele Elmore, The Nature Conservancy, Georgia.

    Conservation efforts help keep Georgia aster off Endangered Species List

    September 17, 2014 | 4 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina – The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced that Georgia aster does not require federal protection under the Endangered Species Act, a decision reflecting years of conservation work by myriad partners. Georgia aster is a wide-ranging, but rare, purple-flowering plant found in the upper Piedmont and lower mountain regions of Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina. The plant has been a candidate for the federal endangered species list since 1999.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • A stack of aged firewood
    Firewood. Photo by Chris Warren, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Great Smoky Mountains National Park and heat-treated firewood

    July 28, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Officials at Great Smoky Mountains National Park are proposing to help protect park forests by further limiting the type of firewood brought into the park. Non-native, tree-killing insects and diseases can be unknowingly introduced into the park through firewood transported from infested areas. The park proposes reducing this threat by changing park rules to allow only heat-treated wood to be brought into the park for campground fires.  Learn more...

  • Three furry bats hang from the wet ceiling of a cave.
    Trio of tri-colored bats. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Forest Service caves closed

    July 21, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. As the fatal bat disease white nose syndrome continues to spread, leaving millions of dead bats in its wake, land managers continue working to check its spread. In an effort to prevent the human spread of the disease by clothes or equipment, most federal and state caves have been closed to the public, and the Regional Forester for the Southern Region of the U.  Learn more...

  • Birds splashing water as they fly off of a lake.
    Information icon Mallards taking flight. Photo by Tom Koerner, USFWS.

    Duck populations

    July 14, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Seeing redhead ducks in the local pond on my drive home from work is a little treat. Overall redheads aren’t rare ducks, but the Southern Appalachians are not a hotbed of duck activity and it’s nice to see some migrant ducks amidst the resident mallards that seem to dominate the local waterfowl scene. Duck populations have increased in overall abundance over last year, and their habitat conditions have improved, according to the U.  Learn more...

  • The silhouette of a deer with large antlers in front of an orange sky.
    Deer silhouette. Photo by USFWS.

    Chronic wasting disease and North Carolina

    July 7, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. After looking at more than 3,800 free-ranging deer in 2013 and 2014, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission has not detected the fatal, untreatable wildlife affliction, chronic wasting disease, despite its presence in Virginia and other nearby states. Chronic Wasting Disease is a transmissible neurological disease of deer, elk, and related mammals, that causes a spongy deterioration of the animal’s brain.  Learn more...

  • A man with a head lamp looks for spiders below a rock outcrop.
    Fred Coyle searching for spruce-fir moss spiders. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Spruce fir moss spider

    June 23, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. It was quite balmy in Asheville on that particular late-May morning. While the weather may be warm and clear in town, it’s no indication of conditions above 6000 feet, on the shoulders of Mount Mitchell, the highest peak east of the Mississippi River. It’s there, on the mountain-top islands of cool, moist climate, where you’ll find the spruce-fir moss spider.  Learn more...

  • A purple flower with a green basin on its backside.
    Mountain purple pitcher plant flowers. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Purple mountain pitcher plant

    June 16, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which keeps our nation’s list of threatened and endangered animals, was recently asked to place the purple mountain pitcher plant on that list. I recently had a chance to visit the last place this pitcher plant grows in the wild in Georgia. After a long drive along a country road, then a few miles along a gravel road to a remote corner of National Forest, we were ready to hike to the site.  Learn more...

  • A refuge law enforcement officer in uniform shows a child how to cast a rod.
    Zone Officer Butler teaching Cub Scouts how to fish at a summer camp in Brunswick, GA. Photo by USFWS.

    Free fishing

    June 9, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. On July 4, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission invites anglers and would-be anglers of all ages to go fishing — for free. From 12:01 a.m. until 11:59 p.m., everyone in North Carolina — resident and non-residents alike — can fish in any public body of water, including coastal waters, without purchasing a fishing license or additional trout fishing privilege.  Learn more...

  • Mussels being cultivated in the lab
    Information icon Lampsilis mussels at the NCWRC’s Conservation Aquaculture Center. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    North Carolinas Conservation Aquaculture Center

    June 2, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. It’s a non-descript metal building in a compound tucked on the edge of Marion, North Carolina. From the outside, it looks like just another small warehouse. However, step inside and it’s clear you’re in no warehouse. This is the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission’s Conservation Aquaculture Center. Inside, the hum of water pumps fills the air, and you see shelves filled with water basins and a network of PVC pipes moving water through them.  Learn more...

  • A group of children runs through shallow water with a net in the foreground.
    Collecting fish in the North Toe River. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Economic impact of the Partners for Fish and Wildlife program

    May 26, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. We all stood on the bank of Mitchell County’s North Toe River, watching as the track hoe chipped away at the old, decrepit Spruce-Pine dam. Removing the crumbling dam allowed fish to move upstream and take advantage of that habitat, and removed a safety hazard for local paddlers. The dam’s removal was paid for in part by Partners for Fish and Wildlife, a program of the U.  Learn more...

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