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Tag: Asheville Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Asheville Ecological Services Field Office.”

Articles

  • A mechanical jackhammer works on removing the Dillsboro dam.
    Information icon Removing the Dillsboro Dam. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Tuckasegee River revives after dam removal

    March 28, 2012 | 5 minute read

    Two years after watching a hydraulic hammer begin removing the Dillsboro Dam from the Tuckasegee River, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) biologist Mark Cantrell is excited about what the removal is coming to mean for life beneath the river’s surface. “When the Nantahala area relicensing process offered the possibility of dam removal, we saw an opportunity to transform a portion of the river and restore part of our lost natural heritage,” said Cantrell, who specializes on the impacts of dams on rivers.  Learn more...

Podcasts

  • A small brown bat on the roof of a cave with a fuzzy white fungus on its nose.
    A tri-color bat in the Avery County with white-nose syndrome. Photo by Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC.

    White-nose syndrome spreads in Western North Carolina

    April 11, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian creature feature. White-nose syndrome, the disease responsible for killing millions of North American bats continues to spread in Western North Carolina. Earlier this spring the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission confirmed the disease in Haywood County, the fifth North Carolina county where the disease has been discovered. The Haywood confirmation comes from dead bats collected from an abandoned mine. The disease was previously discovered in a retired Avery County mine, a cave at Grandfather Mountain, a McDowell County cave, an abandoned mine in Yancey County, and near the Pisgah Center for Wildlife Education in Transylvania County.  Learn more...

  • A small brown bat on the roof of a cave with a fuzzy white fungus on its nose.
    A tri-color bat in the Avery County with white-nose syndrome. Photo by Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC.

    Grant to help fight white-nose syndrome

    April 4, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. As the bat disease white nose syndrome continues to spread in the Southern Appalachians, the U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service recently announced 1.4 million dollars to fund research into the disease and ways to control it. Funding for the grants was provided under the Endangered Species Act. White-nose syndrome has killed more than 5.5 million bats in eastern North America and has spread rapidly across the United States and into Canada since it was first detected in 2006.  Learn more...

  • A hand holding two orange/black mussels with gold plates with an identifying number.
    Appalachian elktoe from the Cane River. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Rearing Appalachian elktoes in captivity

    March 28, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. A standard tool for biologists working to recover endangered species is either breeding rare plants or animals in captivity or raising them in captivity to increase their likelihood of survival. This can be quite complicated, as it involves plants or animals that are extremely rare, and for which we know little about their life cycles. In the shadow of the Whittier, North Carolina post office, state and federal biologists searched the bottom of the Tuckasegee River for Appalachian elktoe mussels.  Learn more...

  • A brown eagle with a very sharp curved beak flying through the air.
    Golden eagle. Photo by Tom Koerner, USFWS.

    Golden eagles in the Southern Appalachians

    March 21, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. We came to a stop on the shoulder of the dirt road, got out of the car, crossed the road, and the driver pointed to a spot near the top of a rocky cliff. It was a golden eagle nest, and on it was the first golden eagle I had ever seen. But that was Montana. Golden eagles are well-known in the West, where populations number up to 35,000 birds, however, there’s a much smaller, and lesser known Eastern population estimated at between 1,000 and 2,500 individuals, which was essentially unknown to ornithologists until the 1930s.  Learn more...

  • A piece of heavy machinery deconstructs a small dam.
    A trackhoe begins the work of demolishing Dillsboro Dam. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Rebirth of the Tuckasegee River

    March 14, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This tiny olive dater is a fish is rare enough to get the attention of state and federal wildlife biologists, so any help it gets is welcome. The fish had never been found upstream of Dillsboro Dam in North Carolina’s Tuckasegee River. However, that dam was removed two years ago, and biologists have since discovered one of the darters upstream of the former dam site, hopefully expanding a range previously limited by a massive stone wall.  Learn more...

  • A brown bird with purple wing tips floats on semi-frozen water.
    Female wood duck at Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge. Photo © Quincey Banks.

    Birding at Ochlawaha bog

    March 7, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The dry, late-winter brush covering the field was several feet high as we walked across, side-by-side, looking for birds. Then, with startling suddenness, a bird shot out of the brush, flying for several yards before settling back down to earth. It was a woodcock, a gamebird, and for the knowing observer, her flush gave away the existence of her nest, hidden on the ground and holding a pair of eggs.  Learn more...

  • A young woman in waders fishing in a shallow river.
    Fishing the Green River. Photo by Katie Theule.

    Boating, fishing, and the Chattooga River

    February 29, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The Chattooga River is perhaps best known across the nation as the place where the movie Deliverance was filmed, beginning what seems like endless banjo and paddling jokes. Locally, the Chattooga enjoys a reputation as home to some of the wildest angling and paddling experiences in the Southern Appalachians. However, anglers and boaters haven’t recently been on the best of terms when it comes to sharing the Chattooga.  Learn more...

  • Tax from check-off for wildlife

    February 22, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Tax time. A burden, with a bit of a consolation for those receiving a refund. But for people in North Carolina, it’s also an opportunity. On line 28 of your North Carolina state income tax form you can check of to contribute money to the state’s Non-game and Endangered Wildlife Fund, where it matches federal and other grants, or is used to fund educational activities and watchable-wildlife projects like the North Carolina Birding Trail.  Learn more...

  • A bunch of serrated leaves with tufts of beige fibers that look like pipe cleaners.
    Flowering American chestnut. Photo by Bob McInnes, CC BY 2.0.

    Return of the American chestnut

    February 15, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. When you work with endangered species, you sometimes reflect on those that may disappear in your life, or the pristine places that have become spoiled. However, our generation is poised to bear witness to the near opposite – the revival and return of what was once one of our most important species here in the Eastern United States. American chestnuts were once the most dominant tree in eastern forests, their chestnuts a hugely important source of food for forest animals, their wood commercially prized, and can still occasionally be found in old mountain buildings.  Learn more...

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