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Tag: Asheville Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Asheville Ecological Services Field Office.”

Podcasts

  • A NC biologist holding a sicklefin redhorse on a river bank in front of a hydroelectric dam.
    Information icon North Carolina biologist TR Russ holding an sicklefin redhorse. Photo by Mark Cantrell, USFWS.

    Sicklefin redhorse conservation

    February 6, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature The Little Tennessee River runs wide and deep just below Emory Dam, outside Franklin North Carolina. In the late-morning sun on an April day, a jon boat plied the water back and forth. Protruding from the bow and dropping into the water was a pair of electrodes wired to an on-board generator. Perched in the bow was a biologist with a long-handled net waiting to scoop up fish stunned by the electric current flowing through the water.  Learn more...

  • A small furry bat in a crevice of a cave with patches of white fungus on its face and shoulder.
    A northern-long-eared bat with suspected White Nose Syndrome. Photo by Steve Taylor, University of Illinois.

    North Carolina bat decline

    January 30, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The biologists eyed the bat box on the banks of the Tuckasegee River. Counter in hand, they tallied how many bats were using the box. This is the fourth year they’ve done these counts at a string of bat roosting boxes along the river. And this spring they witnessed a precipitous decline in the number of bats using the sites from past years.  Learn more...

  • A pudgy squirrel climbs down the side of a tree.
    Carolina northern flying squirrel. Photo by NCWRC.

    Carolina northern flying squirrel

    January 23, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. 2013 marks the 40th anniversary of the Endangered Species Act, an anniversary we’re marking by taking a closer look at some of the endangered species of the Southern Appalachians. For wildlife biologists, winter is often the down time of the year – a time to compile data from the year’s field work and set about the laborious, and indoor, task of writing reports.  Learn more...

  • Curly white and yellow honeysuckle flowers growing off of a lush green plant.
    Japanese honeysuckle. Photo by Carol Foil, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Japanese honeysuckle

    January 16, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Japanese honeysuckle – for many, those yellow and white blooms are as indicative of summer as fireflies, watermelon, and baseball. All of us probably have memories of plucking the flowers and pulling the pistil through the flower’s base to capture that drop of nectar. However, this plant wasn’t always emblematic of summer in the South. As its name implies, it’s not from around here.  Learn more...

  • Curly white and yellow honeysuckle flowers growing off of a lush green plant.
    Japanese honeysuckle. Photo by Carol Foil, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    An app to track invasive plants

    January 9, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. There was a joke going around recently about how we have the collective knowledge of humanity accessible through a device that fits in our pocket, which we mainly use to look at pictures of cats. It’s kind of amazing the frivolity that lies at the heart of most of our smart phone use. However, there are opportunities to use these tools to make this world a better place.  Learn more...

  • Dozens of brown bats with long ears attached to the roof of a cave in a cluster.
    Information icon Cluster of Virginia big-eared bats (Corynorhinus townsendii virginianus). Photo by Dave Riggs, CC BY-SA 2.0.

    Searching for bat maternity colonies

    January 2, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. What happened to the Lost Colony at Roanoke? Where is the Lost Dutchman Mine? Did Lee Harvey Oswalt act alone? Where do Grandfather Mountain’s female bats go in the summer? Tremendous mysteries all. The caves of Grandfather Mountain serve as a hibernation site, or hibernaculum, for a group of endangered Virginia big-eared bats. What biologists are clueless about is where these bats go when it warms up.  Learn more...

  • Six people wearing life preservers on a boat.
    People enjoying a boat. Photo by Greg Workman, FWC.

    Latest survey of wildlife-based recreation

    December 10, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Every five years the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service conducts a national survey providing a look at the level of participation and spending on wildlife-based recreation, such as hunting, fishing, and wildlife watching. It’s done at the request of all the state fish and wildlife agencies, and the actual questioning is done by the U.S. Census bureau, who spoke with more than 48,000 households in 2011.  Learn more...

  • A quickly spreading grass.
    Exotic invasive Japanese stiltgrass. Photo by NY State IPM Program at Cornell University, CC BY 2.0.

    Invasive exotic species - Japaneses stilt-grass

    December 3, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings, and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Invasive species management is an on-going challenge for land managers as there always seem to be new or spreading outbreaks. On a recent afternoon, biologists working at a bog in Henderson County actually experimented with using a shop-vacuum to remove Japanese stilt-grass seeds, sadly to no avail. Also called Nepalese browntop or by its genus name, microstegium, in the United States, this Asian plant was first seen in the Knoxville area around 1919, and its suspected it was used as packing material for porcelain.  Learn more...

  • A biologist looks in a net with two schoolkids to explain what they found.
    John Fridell checks a D net. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Toes in the Toe Watershed Discovery

    November 26, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings, and welcome to the Southern Appalachian creature feature. Few children ever get the opportunity to wade into a stream, shoes on, while their teacher not only looks one, but encourages them. However, nearly every fifth grade student in Yancey and Mitchell counties recently had just that opportunity as they went out to the North and South Toe rivers for this year’s Toes in the Toe Discovery – an annual event that aims to get kids out of the classroom and to a river in their community for a day of learning.  Learn more...

  • A hand holding eight endangered Cumberland bean mussels.
    Information icon Cumberlandian combshell mussels. Photo by USFWS.

    Endangered mussels reintroduced to the Powell River

    November 20, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The Powell River flows southwest out of Virginia’s coal country and into east Tennessee, before its waters eventually flow into the Tennessee River, draining some of the most rural land in the Southern Appalachians. Biologists recently convened on the banks of the river, near Tazewell, Tennessee. The area was an idyllic setting of farms lining the long valleys of ridge and valley province of the western side of the Southern Appalachians.  Learn more...

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