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Tag: Asheville Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Asheville Ecological Services Field Office.”

Articles

  • Two woman in a dark cave wearing head-to-toe coverings.
    Information icon Sue Cameron, USFWS (left), Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC (right) checking a mine wall for bats. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Biologists work to solve bat mystery in Western North Carolina mountains

    February 12, 2013 | 4 minute read

    In North Carolina, endangered Virginia big-eared bats are known from only two caves at Grandfather Mountain, where they hibernate. What has puzzled biologists for years is where these bats go in the summer to give birth. This spring a massive effort aims to answer that question. About 12,000 Virginia big-eared bats are known to exist in four states and 400 of those hibernate in the Grandfather Mountain caves. This species typically hibernates in one place, and with warmer weather, the two sexes each migrate to different locations for the summer, with the females departing to give birth and rear their young in a maternity colony.  Learn more...

News

  • A brown bat attached to the roof of a cave with white fuzz around its nose
    Information icon In this 2016 photo, a tri-colored bat with evidence of White Nose Syndrome (WNS) hibernates on the wall of the Black Diamond Tunnel in the North Georgia mountains. Photo by Pete Pattavina, USFWS.

    White-nose syndrome decimates North Carolina’s bats

    April 29, 2013 | 4 minute read

    Biologists with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) have determined that white-nose syndrome (WNS) continues to decimate bat populations in western North Carolina, with some infected locations showing up to a 95 percent decline in hibernating bats over the past one to two years. The disease, which has been confirmed in seven counties in western North Carolina, does not affect people. Wildlife Commission biologists surveying bat populations have documented declining bat populations by site.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • A large black bear looks inquisitively through the tall grass.
    Black bear at Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by USFWS.

    Living with bears

    October 21, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature With a rash of media reports of bear sightings across North Carolina, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission reminds residents not to panic and to remain calm if you see a black bear. Bears are not inherently dangerous and seeing a bear can be a once-in-a-lifetime experience for residents to appreciate from a safe distance. Sometimes a young bear accidentally finds its way into a town when the natural corridor, river or drainage ditch it’s traveling leads into a town.  Learn more...

  • A low-growing green plant with a flower forming.
    Ginseng flower forming. Photo by Forest Farming, CC BY-ND 2.0.

    New rules for ginseng permits

    October 21, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Citing concerns over declines in wild ginseng, the supervisor of the Pisgah and Nantahala National Forests is limiting ginseng harvest in those areas. A permit is required to harvest wild ginseng on National Forests, and it must be collected during a designated harvest season. Some of this year’s changes include: The number of annual permits issued will be reduced to 136 permits, a 75 percent reduction from recent years.  Learn more...

  • A prehistoric looking fish with spines down its back and sides.
    Information icon Lake sturgeon. Photo by USFWS.

    Southern Appalachian aquatic diversity

    October 21, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The tiny fish in the water-filled plastic bag wouldn’t catch the eye of the casual observer, but to biologists they were part of a great hope. The fish were spotfin chub, a tiny, threatened fish, and these were carefully reared in a fish hatchery and bagged for transport and release into the Cheoah River where hopefully they would thrive.  Learn more...

  • Dozens of brown bats with long ears attached to the roof of a cave in a cluster.
    Cluster of Virginia big-eared bats (Corynorhinus townsendii virginianus). Photo by Dave Riggs, CC BY-SA 2.0.

    North Carolina’s endangered bats

    September 10, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. 2013 marks the 40th anniversary of the Endangered Species Act, an anniversary we’re marking by taking a closer look at some of the endangered species of the Southern Appalachians. In the eastern United States, it’s hard to talk about bat conservation without mentioning white nose syndrome – the bat disease that’s decimating many species as it spreads from the New York area where it was first discovered.  Learn more...

  • A large black bear looks inquisitively through the tall grass.
    Black bear at Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by USFWS.

    Leads sought in dumping of bear carcass

    March 6, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is asking for your help determining who and why someone dumped a bear carcass marked in white paint onto a Buncombe County, North Carolina road. Anyone with information should call 1-800-662-7137. Callers may remain anonymous. A combined reward of $3,000 is offered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Forest Service for information leading to an arrest and conviction in the case.  Learn more...

  • A colorful green/brown and red trout covered in small red spots.
    Information icon A wildlife biologist holds a small eastern brook trout. Photo by Steve Droter, Chesapeake Bay Program.

    North Carolina heritage trout waters

    February 27, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature Three Jackson County, North Carolina towns — Sylva, Webster and Dillsboro — recently joined the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission’s Mountain Heritage Trout Waters Program. The program was established in July 2008 and promotes trout fishing as a North Carolina Heritage Tourism activity. In addition to Dillsboro, Sylva and Webster, eight other cities are in the program — Spruce Pine, Maggie Valley, Waynesville, Bakersville, Burnsville, Newland, Hot Springs and Old Fort.  Learn more...

  • A small red wolf puppy held by a biologist.
    Captive red wolf puppy. Photo by Ryan Nordsven, USFWS.

    Taking care around young wildlife

    February 20, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript The young birds sat on the ground seeming quite helpless, as if waiting for someone to take them home and nurse them to health. However they weren’t helpless. They were merely taking their first trips out of the nest. Young wildlife may be cute — and it may be tempting to bring a fawn, cub, or chick home — but tiny animals are not pets. Human encounters with young animals often increase in the spring, when many wildlife species bear young, but touching or feeding them can hurt wildlife and jeopardize human health.  Learn more...

  • A hand holding two orange/black mussels with gold plates with an identifying number.
    Information icon Appalachian elktoe from the Cane River. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Appalachian elktoe conservation

    February 13, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This year marks the 40th anniversary of the Endangered Species Act, and to celebrate, we’re taking a closer look at some of the endangered species found in the Southern Appalachians. In a building at a state fish hatchery in Marion, North Carolina are a series of tubs with an elaborate piping network leading in and out. Within these tubs the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission is working to rear some of North Carolina’s most endangered freshwater mussels in captivity, including the Appalachian elktoe mussel.  Learn more...

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