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Tag: Asheville Ecological Services Field Office

The content below has been tagged with the term “Asheville Ecological Services Field Office.”

Podcasts

  • A mussel with fringe around its opening partially burried in the sand on the river bottom.
    Information icon Appalachian elktoe in the Little River Translyvania County NC. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Reviewing the status of endangered plants and animals

    March 3, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The Appalachian elktoe is a an endangered freshwater mussel found in a handful of Western North Carolina Rivers, and in a sliver of the Nolichucky River in East Tennessee. For years the plight of the elktoe looked to be improving. The Cheoah River population was expanding thanks to the return of water previously piped overland to a power generating station.  Learn more...

  • A firefighter with a shovel and drip torch walks through a smoky forest.
    USFS fireifghter, Sergio Olvera, patrols a fire perimeter line during the Tallulah Gorge prescribed fire on March 17, 2016. Photo by Holly Krake, USFS.

    Tallulah Gorge prescribed fire

    February 17, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. For the fifth time in ten years, North Georgia’s Tallulah Gorge will see a prescribed fire, as part of an effort to restore and maintain wildlife habitat in and along the two-mile-long canyon. Controlled burns have long been used to manage for habitat and timber, and help prevent destructive wildfires. Additionally, at Tallulah Gorge the burns are done to help rare plants and animals, and in fact, previous burns at Tallulah Gorge have already yielded results, improving habitat for several rare and declining native plant and animal species.  Learn more...

  • A NC biologist holding a sicklefin redhorse on a river bank in front of a hydroelectric dam.
    Information icon North Carolina biologist TR Russ holding an sicklefin redhorse. Photo by Mark Cantrell, USFWS.

    Rare fish recovery

    February 10, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Culminating a 20-year partnership with the state of Oregon, the Army Corps of Engineers, and private landowners, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently proposed removing the Oregon chub from the federal endangered species list. If it goes through, this would be the first fish delisted due to recovery. Fewer than 1,000 fish were known to exist when it was placed on the endangered species list.  Learn more...

  • A large black bear looks inquisitively through the tall grass.
    Black bear at Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by USFWS.

    Managing bear conflicts

    February 3, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The Appalachian Trail crosses North Georgia’s Blood Mountain Wilderness, home to a historic, stone trail shelter; and the site of considerable weekend visitation. The Wilderness was also the scene of increasing bear-human interactions – something land managers try to avoid for the benefit of all involved. To turn that trend around, in 2012 the USDA Forest Service, which manages the Wilderness, began requiring the use of bear-resistant food canisters to carry garbage, toiletries, and food.  Learn more...

  • A dirt path cuts through a lush green forest.
    Trail through the trees. Photo by BLM.

    New hiking trails

    February 3, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Western North Carolina hikers can now enjoy three new trails near the Blue Ridge Parkway, thanks to private citizens, The Conservation Fund, the Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy and the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission. The Rose Creek and Little Table Rock Mountain Trails are on Pisgah Game Land and the Saddle Mountain Trail on Mitchell River Game Land. The Rose Creek Trail is a 1.  Learn more...

  • Red wolves

    January 27, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Red wolves are the wolves of the south. They could once be found from Texas, across the south, and up the Atlantic coast. However, due to eradication efforts and habitat loss, they nearly became extinct. In a last-ditch effort to save the species, an attempt was made to capture all remaining wild red wolves. Of the 17 captured, 14 became the founders of a zoo-based breeding program.  Learn more...

  • A dirt path cuts through a lush green forest.
    Trail through the trees. Photo by BLM.

    Devil’s Britches

    January 20, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The story goes that fall foliage was such a vibrant red that someone likened it to the devil’s britches. The name stuck to the Devil’s Britches hiking trail and now Devil’s Britches IPA is the name of the latest beer in Highland Brewing Company’s seasonal line-up. Highland Brewing has established a strong tradition of naming their seasonal beers after area mountain features, which segued nicely into a partnership with the U.  Learn more...

  • The silhouette of a deer with large antlers in front of an orange sky.
    Deer silhouette. Photo by USFWS.

    Deer to the Qualla Boundary

    January 13, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Oftentimes in endangered species conservation, we’re faced with a situation where you have a small, and vulnerable population of imperiled plants or animals, but you have a large, healthy population elsewhere, or you can successfully propagate and raise them in captivity. In these situations, one of the most basic conservation tools is augmentation – assuming the habitat is okay, you augment the small, vulnerable population with individuals from the large, healthy population, or from those propagated in captivity.  Learn more...

  • Time lapse photo of the Atlanta Skylineshowing heavy traffic.
    Atlanta skyline. Photo by Brendan Lim, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Bird-building collisions

    January 6, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. I was recently passing through Atlanta with a friend, who happens to be a bird biologist, and an avid recreational birder. It was her first time in the city, and as we approached it along the interstate, she looked up at skyscraper after skyscraper, most covered with glass, and she exclaimed simply, “I’ll bet a lot of birds die here.  Learn more...

  • A yellow and black bee lands on a bright pink/purple flower.
    Bee at a Heller’s blazing star flower. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    High elevation plant conservation

    October 21, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Of the highest 41 peaks is in the Eastern United State, 40 are in the Southern Appalachians. These peaks are effectively mountaintop islands, rising above lower elevations to be outposts of cold, often moist, habitat where fir, spruce, and others trees associated with more northern climates, live. Growing on these mountaintops are a handful of endangered wildflowers found nowhere else in the world.  Learn more...

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